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"The King of Guidebooks" 



The American University 





KJlUlllu 



Talon Publications 



i& R 4>. 



1893 - 1993 






3 :'- 









m 






K 



Christopher L. Kokinos 
Editor-in-Chief 



I would like to take this opportunity to welcome 
you to the Centennial edition of The Talon. 
This year marks the 67th edition of this book 
and we are proud to serve as the chronologist 
of the centennial celebration. This 
celebration lasted a full year, bringing such 
distinguished personalities as President 
Clinton. Antonia Novello. Dr. John Hope 
Franklin, and many more. We at Talon 
Publications decided to focus this edition as a 
"guide book" of sorts, as if one were travelling 
to The American University for the celebration. 
On the following pages you will find 
photographs and information chronicling the 
past year. In addition we have added time 
capsules throughout the book spotlighting 
events and happenings, facts and tidbits, that 
have occurred over the 100 years of A.U.. 
I hope that you enjoy this edition as much as 
we did making it. 

I would also like to thank DaVor photography 
for their excellent work with the senior portraits 
as well as to Jim Rainey for three years of 
excellent customer service beyond the call of 
duty. Thanks must also go out to John Bailey 
of Jostens Publishing for his continued support 
and guidance over my last four years at Talon 
Publications. Finally. I would like to thank my 
family and fiancee for their never ending love 
and support. 



Copyright© 1993 by Talon Publications, a 
division of The American University. 

The Talon Logo ,M is the Trademark of 
Talon Publications. Christopher L. 
Kokinos, Designer. Reproduction or 
alteration in any was is strictly forbidden. 

All rights reserved. 

No part of this book may be reproduced, 
stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in 
any other form, or by any means, electronic, 
mechanical, photocopying, recording or 
otherwise, without prior permission of The 
Talon. 

Copyrights of all photographs contained in 
this publication are those of the photographer 
and were printed with permission. Any 
request for reproduction, in any way. should 
!»• made to the photographer. 



While The Talon makes every effort possible 
to publish full and correct credits for each 
photograph, etc., sometimes errors of 
omission or commission may occur. For this 
we are most regretful, but hereby must 
disclaim any liability. 

Publisher: 

Jostens Publishing Company 
2505 Empire Drive 
Winston-Salem, NC 27103 

The 1993 Talon is a project of: 

Talon Publications 

(a division of The American University) 

228 Mary Graydon Center 

The American University 

Washington. DC 20016-8075 

ISSN 0736-9727 

Library of Congress Catalog C-ird Number 

83-643275 



Christopher L. Kokinos 

Edltor-ln-Chlef 

Talon Publications 

Antoinette Gonzales 
Business Manager 

Annie Jegathesan & Heidi Wunder 
Managing Editors 

Matthew Lovering 
Photography Editor 

Academic 
Brent Giebink 
Humana Khan 

Arts 

April Cantor 

Dottie Troehler 

Campus 

Sarah Bealmer 

Megan Brown 

Stephanie Gerard 

Tariq Rizk 

Metro 
Alona Elkayam 
Sharon Ezrin 
Anne Ridenour 

Sports 

Ju Me Chon 

Michelle Hall 

Christine Pockett 

Dario Nabavian 
Asst. Photography Editor 

Contributing Photographers 

Heather Bordin 

Jean-Christophe Brooke 

Jeremy Cohen 

Cara Gilhride 

James Housten 

Jean Meta 

Marci Roth 

Shannon Snow 

Matthew Warshaw 

Jonathan Zuaiter 

Business Associates 

Katrena Henderson 

Mi Young Hur 

Karen Lievano 
Danny Glaberman 

Special thanks to... 

Julie Fraize 

Lisa C. McGarry 

Charlotte Story 

Joi S. Buckner 

Karen Robinson 

The Eagle 

John Bailey 

Jim Rainey 

Michael Graham 
Advisor 










elcome to the American University Talon. 
This book is all you'll need to guide you 
through many sights, sounds, exotic cultures and unique 
distinctions American has to offer. Now, chronicling all 
the activity, all the diversity. This book represents the 

•i .• r .1 r .. .. . .1 • r 



university in our nations capital. And even at that 
capacity we simply couldn't capture it all. There is 
simply so much American has to offer. 
Life on this campus never stops. Every second of every 
day, year round, a group is planning an activity, an 
athlete is training, an actor is rehearsing, and a promi- 
nent personality is considering a speaking engage- 
ment. In fact the campus is more than just a place to eat 
and sleep, attend classes and talk. In itself it is a huge 
learning opportunity. There is so much outside of the 
conventional classroom that is available in the class- 
room of the campus. To get a low down of what 
happened here this year, check out the CAMPUS sec- 
tion. 

Of course, much of the activity at American is somewhat 
a by-product of the environment in which it exists. The 
Metropolis of Washington D.C. can do a lot for a 
college. And you can go nearly anywhere in this city 
and find some connection to American University. 
Students intern in both houses of congress and in 
cabinet offices like the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
and the Environmental Protection Agency., 
institutions also give students valuable hands- 
rience in think-tanks like the Brookings institute 





NATIONAL MUSEUM 



AMERICAN HISTORY. 




huge organizations like the National Rifle Association. 
And if foreign study is in a student's interests, nearly 
every single nation in the world has an embassy here. 
For more information, check out the METRO section. 
If athletics is your bag, there's plenty to see in the 
SPORTS section. Full season coverage of everything 
from swimming to soccer to rugby to field hockey is 
available. It will give you some information on the 
various personalities that make AU sports special like 
"Clawed" the school mascot, and also give some insight 
into who to look for in the years ahead. 
One of American's greatest sources of pride is our 
academic program. As an accredited university, main- 
taining the integrity and competitiveness of our aca- 
demics is of utmost importance. The ACADEMIA 
section will tell you how the dean of each school at 
American approaches the task of keeping pace with the 
ever-changing educational world. 
Of course, no college would be complete without 
healthy exposure to the arts. A full guide through 
American's various choirs, dancing troupes, orchestral 
ensembles and production companies is available in 
the ARTS section. Every performer can truly shine at the 
various year-round productions on and off-campus. 
Even with a population as diverse as American's, you 
can still be certain that common interests will come out 
and students will band together in various organiza- 
tions. For a tour of all the groups (greek, mi 
nationality, political, performing, service-oriehted, or 




various special interest) the ORGANIZAriONS ? sectibrl: 
will not fail you. 

This year is a special year for The American University 
1 993 marks it's centennial. In this edition of the guide 
you'll enjoy little hints and nostalgic tips to help make 
your visit colorful. You'll find information on the history 
of the University, America, and the world chronicled 
over the last 1 00 years. In fact, this guidebook makes 
a great keep-sake from your visit to Washington. 
We would like you to understand that this book is the 
ultimate labor of love. We have worked long and hard 
in to the evenings, in to the mornings, and well into the 
summer on this which you now hold in your hands. It 
is invaluable to us as a goal reached and hopefully to 
you as a resource. We like to think of it as a sort of a 
tour through the various views and visions of our fine 
school. On the whole, you will find that the 1 993 Talon 
is the Ultimate Guidebook for anyone interested in 
travelling through the American University. Thank you, 
and enjoy the celebration. 



<&*+>. 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 

1893 - 1993 



£.BFL4. 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 



£TA^ 
1893 - 1993 



Travelin, 
Through 
Campus 



w 



elcome to the Campus 
Section of the American 
University Talon. Because 
of the diversity of 
American's students and 
faculty, there are few loyal- 
ties we all share. Although 
we encourage, we do not all 
participate in the various 
sporting events on campus. 
We have burgeoning 
intercultural events, a 
significant performing arts 
program, and much more. 
We run this way and that, 
joining clubs and organiza- 
tions, speaking to members 
of various cultures, and 
there isn't much which we 
can all call ours. 
This is it. The campus: this 
piece of earth and these 
buildings of stone. All the 
life we maintain day to day 
pulses through this campus. 
Every organization is 
having a meeting at some 
time or another, every 
sports team is practicing, 
every one has at least a 
single common tie: this 
campus. 

This campus existed first in 
the mind of one man, 
Bishop John Fletcher Hurst 
(pictured at left). Hurst, 
who lives now only in 
history books and the 
building which bears his 
name, first envisioned this 
university on Christmas 



day, 1889. On horseback he 
road beyond the edge of 
Washington, D.C. and 
found the 90 acre hillside 
farm which immediately 
became in his mind The 
American University. The 
remainder of his life was 
dedicated to this school, 
which he called "a beacon 
light on some grand moun- 
tain cliff." 

We have made a special 
effort, in this the hundredth 
year of American's exist- 
ence to record as well the 
life at American University 
throughout the past 100 
years. We have included 
views of life front the 
development of American 
by the U.S. military and the 
turbulent times that en- 
gulfed us during the Viet- 
nam War. For this we have 
to thank Mr. George Arnold 
of the Bender Library 
Archives. Mr. Arnold 
supplied us with endless 
information about the 
hundred years of American 
which have passed. 
For the present and the 
future, however, we alone 
are responsible. This sec- 
tion was composed, pro- 
duced, written, and per- 
formed by Megan Brown, 
Stefanie Gerard, Sara 
Bealmear and Tarek Rizk. 





12 The Talon 



Campus 13 



Travelling in 

Style 



T 



"American 

University 

students have 

made careers 

out of 

recreating 

their style" 



he spirit of this sprawling 
metropolis we call A.U. is 
diversity. And despite 
every unique member of 
the faculty, the Office of 
Multicultural Affairs, and 
every worker in the Ter- 
race Dining Room, the true 
heart of A.U.'s diversity is 
the students. These stu- 
dents who comprise the 
blood that flows through 
the campus are wildly 
varied in background, in 
personality, and especially 
in a sense of style. 
Everyone had that particu- 
lar future scenario that 
included a certain state 
school. And though you 
had only seen the school 
once, it returned to haunt 
your nights with heinous 
examples of the goon you 
would become instantly 
upon application. In 
Pennsylvania, for reasons 
I'm not really sure of, we 
had dozens of state 
schools to fire our inten- 
tions in high school. Every 
one of us was driven by an 
amazing need not to go to 
Clarion, or Penn State, or 
IUP. The style of those 
places was so homog- 
enous, so boring that we 
couldn't fathom becoming 
one of them. Something 
about spending for years 
being like everyone else 
frightened us. 




Illllililii 



iiiiimiuii 



THE 
AMERICAN 
UNIVERSITY 



So we graduated and were 
all sprinkled around the 
United States. Some of us 
did stumble and end up at 
places like I've mentioned. 
However, those of us who 
had a distinct need to 
avoid becoming one of the 
masses, those whose pack 
instinct had somehow 
faded came to places like 
The American University. 
Here, there is no A.U. 



14 The Talon 



style. Within our fairly 
small student body, we 
represent, strictly speaking 
geographically, one hun- 
dred and some-odd coun- 
tries, and nearly every 
state in the Union. 
But that is not where the 
diversity ends. The most 
important thing that 
differentiates every single 
one of us is our style. 
American University 
students have made whole 



college careers out of 
maintaining, revising and 
recreating their own style. 

Style (stil) n. [Lat. 
stylus.] 1. The manner in 
which something is done, 
expressed or performed. 
2. The combination of 
distinctive literary and 
artistic features of expres- 
sion, execution, or perfor- 
mance characterizing a 
particular person, group 





So caught up in the rush of 
embarking on her college career, 
freshman Melissa Scott that she 
doesn't even appear to mind the 
fact that she must unload her 
entire life out of boxes, suitcases 
and milkcrates. (photo by Stefanie 
Gerard) 

On a warm September clay, 
President Joseph Duffey greets 
and welcomes the coming of 
1993, the hundredth year of 
American's existence from 
Opening Convocation in the 
Woods-Brown Amphitheater, 
(photo by Dario Nabavian) 



The true dwelling of 
diversity, of that uncanny 
distinctiveness that we all 
have is the residence halls. 
Each and every door is a 
piece of art representing 
the resident's identity. No 
two rooms are alike. They 
teem with little magical 
items which only the 
inhabitants can explain. 
Other rooms abandon the 
simple material represen- 
tation of their tenants, and 
instead the room takes on 
the personality. If a resi- 
dent can be described as 
dark, the room will reflect 
that. A lively and pert 
persona will live in a 
bright and happy room. It 
never fails. Students work 
harder on their rooms than 
on their school work or 
anything else for that 
matter. The room is you, 
and you are the room. 
And all of it is style. 

Tarek N. Rizk 



Campus 15 



I suppose we 

could just 

raffle off the 

trip" 

Chris Canavan 

President of Letts 

Hall 




Roamin, 
The Halls 



T 



he American University 
Residence Hall Associa- 
tion is an organization 
dedicated to a single 
concept: providing a 
comfortable, enjoyable, 
and varied life for students 
in the residence halls. 

This year, they have 
done just that. Through- 
out the year, the RHA has 
worked to provide pro- 
gramming and activities 
which appeal to every 
person it can reach. The 
agenda in each hall, as 



well as the schedule of 
campus-wide programs 
has reflected their mission 
with extreme creativity 
and thought. 

Of course, there must 
be a certain mind-set to 
accept these programs. 
Halls have identities, 
individual and varied. 
Each idea for program- 
ming is conceived in the 
mind of a member of that 
building's executive 
board. These people live 
there, and they know what 




kind of people live in the 
residence, and what they 
will enjoy. 

"We have mentioned 
hundreds of programs in 
meetings," explained Jen 
Seltenrich, Secretary of 
Leonard Hall, "but you get 
a feel for what the people 
you live with will go for. 



16 The Talon 





And some things they just 
won't." 

The E-boards had their 
work cut out for them this 
year, but they seemed to 
have coped well under the 
pressure. 

Some of the favorite 
programs run this year 
in residence halls have 



The Woods-Brown Amphitheatre 
serves many purposes. When not 
being used for formal ceremonies 
and concerts, the Amphithreatre is 
filled with residents tanning, 
relaxing or just socializing, (photo 
by Matt Lovering) 

For only the cost of one non- 
perishable good, Leonard Hall 
residents eat a deluxe 
Thanksgiving Dinner with turkey, 
corn, pumpkin pie, stuffing, and a 
million other turkey-day-type 
things, courtesy of The Hall 
Council and the R.A's of 
Leonard. (photo by Dario 
Nabavian) 



been distinctly the sort of 
thing that you only do in 
college. 

College life is often 
summarized by spontane- 
ous activitiy. A program 
run this year in Letts Hall 
symbolized everything 
spur of the moment about 
everyone's days in college. 
The program was entitled 
"Come Pack Your Bags," 
and never a more telling 
title there was. The execu- 
tive board raffled off an 
expenses paid trip to 
Daytona Beach, Florida. 
That was round trip air- 
fare and two nights in a 
hotel right on the beach. 
The raffle tickets were sold 
to anyone who had a 
dollar. However there 
was a catch, and that was 
where the title became so 
very true. The drawing 
was held two hours before 
the flight left National 
Airport. Upon notification 
of their victory, the win- 
ners had to sprint to their 
rooms, pack their bags and 
split in a cab for the sun 
and fun of Florida. What 
could be better? 

"I suppose we could 
just raffle off the trip," 

continued on pg. 26 



Time Capsule 






. 










Mary Graydon Center, the American University's 
combination of student union building and sprawling office 
complex is one of the many buildings with an illustrious and 
somewhat military past. It sprang from the dozens of temporary 
structures the US government erected on campus while using 
the McKinley building as a research center for Chemical 
weaponry during WWI. The government began to build the 
permanent building, accepting $600,000 in trustee money, but 
then ceased. The American University Courier, a campus 
newletter of the time printed these words on November 1 1 , 
1918: "When the tide was turning against the Central Powers, 
Government stopped work on the building, after expending 
5,000, and left the unfinished structure in its present 
unpresentable appearance." 

After the stalled construction was completed by the 
University with the help of a benefactor who preferred 
anonymity, the building was dedicated as the "Women's 
Residence." The benefactor was Mary Elizabeth Graydor 
Methodist whose grandfather, Patrick Clendennon, had I 
with a great deal of money. Respecting her wishes for 
anonymity only until 1946 (twenty years after her death) 
University rededicated the women's residence as Man 
Graydon Hall. As the University grew, Hughes lv>" 
a new women's residence hall, and Mary Givr 
converted into a facility closer to its current ii • 
center of general activity. This change •/. 
1960 renaming of the building as M.ai\ . . r»l I 




Campus 17 



"College life 

is often 

summarized 

by 

spontaneous 

activity." 



continued from pg. 25 

explained Letts Hall presi- 
dent Chris Canavan, "but 
I'm sure the winners will 
enjoy the thrill of being 
hurled to Florida on a 
moment's notice. Who 
wouldn't?" 

Another program 
which was something 
distinctly collegiate was 
the ominous and mysteri- 
ous T.A.G. (The Assassina- 
tion Game). This concept 
engulfed Leonard Hall for 
a week during the first 
semester. About sixty 
members of the hall par- 
ticipated, but at times it 
seemed like everyone was 
playing the game. Com- 
plete strangers were as- 
signed other complete 
strangers to assassinate 
(by branding with a sticker 
bearing their name), and 
with each kill, the victim 
turned the name of their 
prey over to the person 
who killed him. So the list 
gradually shrank, but not 
until the most frightening 





18 The Talon 




Visitors of all ages Attended 
parents weekend. Here a 
student and her little sister stand 
about on the Quad while their 
parents shop at the vendor fair 
which was part of the Heritage 
Festival. 

developments occurred. 
One such event is recorded 
in the Leonard Hall front 
desk logbook. 

"4:56pm.(October21) 
Linda Gualtieri screams, 
creating a disturbance in 
the lobby. She is chased 
by a man in a black mask 
to the rest room. I ask him 
for his access card. 
M(ary)S(hillue)" 

Sophomore Aaron S. 
Brickman went to great 
lengths to become victori- 
ous in the game. Accord- 
ing to what has become a 
hall fable Aaron went so 
far as to sleep first in a 
different room in Leonard, 
and then later in a friend's 
room in Anderson Hall to 
avoid being killed. Unfor- 
tunately, all the precaution 
was not enough and 
Aaron was the last victim 




to be killed. He was assas- 
sinated in the Terrace 
Dining Room. 

Another popular pro- 
gram in on-campus-hous- 
ing is the beauty pageant. 
Although not your tradi- 
tional Ms. America-type 
affair, these contests do 
capture some of the fun 
and uniqueness of the 
Resident's concerned. 

On Saturday March 
20th, Hughes Hall took the 
Tavern by storm, celebrat- 
ing the annual selection of 
Mr. Hughes Hall. This 
event, now a tradition at 
Hughes is a mockery of 
the conventional beauty 
pageant. Various contes- 
tants, all men, parade 
about like fools in front of 
a screaming horde of hall- 
mates in the formal wear, 
casual (swimsuit), and 
talent competitions. Then, 
of course, the screaming 
horde selects a contestant 
most representative of 
Hughes Hall to become 
Mr. Hughes. 

Similarly, Anderson 
Hall scheduled a beauty 
pageant also to be held in 
the Tavern. This event is 
presented in conjunction 
with the 1993 Homecom- 
ing/Centennial Celebra- 
tion. The winners, who 
were selected from and by 
the residents of Anderson, 
represented Anderson 
Hall in the Homecoming 
continued on pg. 28 



Another unique cultural 
aspect of the 1 992 American 
University Heritage Festival 
was the dancers. This year's 
festival featured Indian, 
Pakistani and Hawaiian 
dancers. (photos by Matt 
Lovering) 

Enjoying one last fall day 
before winter besets AU with 
wind and cold, these studer 
appeared completely 
comfortable. 



Campus 19 



"There is a 

great 

emphasis in 

living well 

while 

learning 

well." 




continued from pg. 27 
King and Queen Contest, 
as well as at various sport- 
ing events. Riotous good 
times were guaranteed for 
all. 

These programs were 
just a few of the many that 
were created and executed 
by students motivated 
enough to work at making 
the residence life better. 
They accepted the posi- 
tions they held knowing 
there was work to be done, 
and the numerous activi- 
ties which have occurred 
clearly show a job well 
done. 




20 The Talon 



The Guided 



Tour 

Orientation is some- 
thing that has 
recently "come 
into vogue" at colleges 
across America. There is a 
great emphasis in looking 
beyond the simple aca- 
demics of college life and a 
new concentration in 
living well while learning 
well. American Univer- 
sity, being a school of 
great diversity has a vast 
Orientation program, large 
enough to deal with any of 
the varied students who 
pass through our school. 
The program is spon- 
sored by the Division of 
Student Life. However, 
the program is designed 
and maintained by stu- 
dents. The program is 
headed by four student 
coordinators. These coor- 
dinators (two general 



coordinators, one for 
parents and sponsors and 
one for transfers) are hired 
by the University to serve 
as references for students 
and their parents during 
fall, spring, and summer 
orientation. 

The duties of an Orien- 
tation Coordinator are 
many. The Coordinators 
must fill the orientation 
weekend, plus the four 
SOAR (Summer Orienta- 
tion and Advisement 
Registration) sessions with 
speakers, entertainment, 
and other programs in- 
volving themselves and 
the 90 Orientation Assis- 
tants (OA). 

The OA's were also 
student volunteers, who 
counselled the new stu- 
dents and participated in 
the programming de- 




signed and run by the 
Orientation Coordinators. 

The Orientation con- 
cept is one constantly in a 
state of revision and 
progress. The division of 
Student Life spends each 
passing school year rede- 
signing and improving the 
Orientation sessions. One 
of this year's advances is 
the program entitled 
Community Living . The 
Community Living session 
was made up of Orienta- 
tion Assistants and Coor- 
dinators acting out sce- 
narios involving racism, 
sexism, harrassment, and 
other problems which 
could occur in college life. 
Then the actors and the 
new students talk about 
ways to deal with these 
problems, and experiences 
or concerns they have had 
with them. 

Another important part 
of the orientation process 
is the assignment of each 



Halloween is sometimes thought 
to be a holiday reserved for little 
children, but American 
University doesn't let any 
holiday go unobvserved. Here a 
seemingly grown college student 
exalts in the mountain of treats 
she obtained. ( photo by Matt 
Lovering) 

Sporting a demonic grin, this 
trick-or-treated prepares for an 
evening of mischief.(photo by 
Matt Lovering) 



student to one of the 
orientation assistants. 
Each OA has about a 
dozen students which he 
or she meets with in a 
group. These students talk 
and listen to the OA give 
minor orientation-related 
tips. The OA's are also on 
hand when the students 
need a person to address 
any of their concern. They 
assure new students that if 
they ever have any ques- 
tions to ask, or and prob- 
lems they might need help 
with, the students can call 
on their Orientation Assis- 
tant. 

Overall, the Orienta- 
tion program, which 
began years ago as noth- 
ing more than a glorified 
campus tour, has pro- 
gressed to become an 
important resource for 
every student who is new 
to the American Univer- 
sity. 



Anxiously awaiting a full course 
Thanksgiving dinner courtesy of 
RHA are Leonard Hall residents 
who are holding their plates with 
anticipation, (photo by Dario 
Nabavian) 



Campus 21 




CD 





Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Conneticut 

Delaware 



14 

5 

16 

3 

134 

176 

24 



LO 



Dist. of Columbia 134 

Florida 218 

Georgia 61 

Hawaii 7 

Idaho 2 

Illinois 90 

Indiana 13 

Iowa 11 

Kansas 31 

Kentucky 22 

Louisana 20 

Maine 31 

Maryland 440 

Massachusetts 270 

Michigan 23 

Minnesota 40 

Mississippi 2 

Missouri 44 

Montana 3 

Nebraska 10 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 34 

New Jersey 433 

New Mexico 18 

New York 541 

North Carolina 34 

North Dakota 3 

Ohio 144 

Oklahoma 16 

Oregon 23 

Pennsylvania 476 

Rhode Island 57 

South Carolina 1 2 

South Dakota 1 

Tennesse 28 

Texas 74 

Utah 3 

Vermont 21 

Virginia 230 



Washington 17 

West Virginia 1 6 

Wisconsin 26 

Wyoming 2 
American Samoa 1 

Guam 2 

Puerto Rico 46 

Virgin Islands 13 

Afghanistan 1 

Algeria 2 

Argentina 7 
Aruba Neth Antillesl 

Austria 4 

Bahamas 1 

Bahrain 5 

Bangladesh 2 

Barbados 1 

Belgium 2 

Belize 1 

Benin 1 

Bolivia 3 

Brazil 4 
British Virgin Isl. 1 

Bulgaria 3 

Cambodia 3 

Cameroon 2 

Canada 9 

Chile 3 

China 3 

Colombia 5 

Costa Rica 1 

Cuba 1 

Cyprus 10 
Czechoslovakia 1 

Demark 1 

Ecuador 11 

Egypt 3 

El Salvado 5 

Ethiopia 2 

Finland 2 

France 12 

Gabon 2 

Germany 13 

Great Britain 15 

Greece 9 

Guatemala 1 



Guinea 


1 


Guyana 


1 


Haiti 


3 


Honduras 


4 


Hong Kong 


3 


Hungary 


2 


India 


18 


Indonesia 


9 


Iran 


8 


Ireland 


2 


Israel 


7 


Italy 


9 


Ivory Coast 


2 


Jamaica 


8 


Japan 


28 


Jordan 


8 


Kenya 


5 


Korea 


12 


Kuwait 


7 


Lebanon 


12 


Liberia 


2 


Luxembourg 


1 


Malaysia 


4 


Mexico 


3 


Monaco 


1 


Morocco 


6 


Netherlands 


2 


New Zealand 


1 


Nicaragua 


3 


Nigeria 


3 


Norway 


3 


Oman 


16 


Pakistan 




Panama 




Paraguay 


3 


Peru 


11 


Philippines 




Poland 




Romania 




Saint Kitts 




Saint Vincent 




Saudia Arabia 


16 


Sierra Leone 


2 


Singapore 


2 


Somalia 


2 


South Africa 


2 



22 The Talon 



Spain 


16 


Sri Lanka 


2 


Sudan 


1 


Sweden 


14 


Switzerland 


1 


Syria 


2 


Tanzania 


4 


Taiwan 


12 


Thailand 


2 


Trinidad & Tobago 7 


Turkey 


11 


Uganda 


1 


U Arab Emirates 


6 


U.S.S.R. 


3 


Uruguay 


3 


Venezuela 


12 


Vietnam 


4 


Yemen 


3 


Yugoslavia 


1 


Zaire 


1 


Zambia 


1 



A Lon, 
Strange Trip 



B 



From a 

comedy club 

to a political 

forum, to a 

center of 

cutting edge 

environmental 

policy, 

Bender Arena 

serves many 

purposes. 



ender Arena is much more 
than simply a sports 
complex. Bender Arena 
has been transformed at 
different times this year 
into many different incar- 
nations. From a comedy 
club to a political forum to 
a center of cutting edge 
environmental policy, 
Bender Arena served 
many purposes. This year 
only expanded the estab- 
lished alternative uses for 
Bender, adding the afore- 
mentioned to the tradi- 
tional Spring Concert 
format. The greatest 
opportunity for making 
creative use of Bender 
came with American's 
Centennial Celebration. 
Bender was charged with 
some real spirit when it 



was packed for the Cen- 
tennial Convocation. 
Overall, Bender Arena 
while still being the center 
for sports and physical 
fitness, also became some- 
what of a center for all 
forms of expression. 

At the opening of the 
semester, Bender Arena 
became American's only 
comedy club, hosting a 
particularly caustic Dennis 
Miller, with guest and 
fellow Saturday Night 
Live alum David Spade. 
Having left Saturday 
Night Live to host an 
entertaining but ill-fated 
talk-show, and also having 
grown a beard, Miller may 
have looked unfamiliar to 
some students. However, 
his biting commentary on 





24 The Talon 




the world today, especially 
our political world of 
Washington D.C., was still 
right on target. Miller's 
traditional sarcasm was in 
true fighting form as he 
took typical jabs at the 
presidential race engulfing 
our nation at the time. 
Miller also took some time 
to spread some interesting 
insights on life in general. 
Overall, the Student Union 
Board-produced show was 
a grand success. Opening 
act David Spade also was a 
welcome addition, provid- 
ing a fascinating if not a 
little warped view on the 
world in which we live. 
Bender again under- 
went a massive metamor- 
phosis during the thrill-a- 
minute Centennial /Home- 
coming celebration in 
February. The highlight of 
the week came on Febru- 
ary 26. On this date, 
history was made at 
American University. For 
the first time since John 
Kennedy's historical 
commencement speech 
thirty year's prior, the 
President of the United 
States addressed an audi- 
ence at American Univer- 
sity. This crown of the 
Centennial / Homecoming 
was coordinated by the 
various student and fac- 
ulty committees and was 
also helped by A.U. Presi- 
dent Joe Duffy's close 
friendship with President 
Clinton. Although the 
formal announcement was 
only made less than two 
weeks prior to the actual 
Convocation, American 
buzzed with rumors of the 

continued on pg. 26 



The Bender Arena was 
transformed into a comedy club 
as Saturday Night Live alum 
Dennis Miller brought his wry 
brand of political satire to 
American. The SUB sponsored 
show packed the Arena, (photo 
by Matt Lovering) 

Also on leave from Saturday 
Night Live, opening act David 
Spade pondered the meaning of 
life, entertaining American 
students with commentary about 
everday happenings. (photo by 
Matt Lovering) 

Bringing out the soul and spirit of 
the new Bay-area sound, Spring 
Concert headliner Blues Traveler 
filled Bender Arena with their 
mellow tunes and rocking jams, 
(photo by Cara Gilbride) 



Campus 25 




continued from pg. 25 

President's address for 
months. Lines that rivaled 
crowds for concert tickets 
formed outside of the 
Bender Box Office during 
the days when tickets were 
made available. When all 
the seats were taken, over 
10,000 students, faculty, 
administration, and 
alumni were inside and 
Secret Service protected 
Bender Arena. Security 
was excruciatingly tight, 
as journalists and students 
alike had to pass through 
numerous I.D. and metal 
detector checks. Finally, 
the moment arrived; Bill 
Clinton was on the stage. 
Flanking President Clinton 



was his first congressional 
employer, Senator 
Fulbright, who inspired 
Clinton to seek a political 
future. 

When he finally took 
the stage, following vari- 
ous comments from the 
likes of President Duffy, 
Bill Clinton took the op- 
portunity to tell a story. 
He told of his helping Joe 
Duffy in his bid for a seat 
in the House of Represen- 
tatives. However, the bid 
was unsuccessful. Follow- 
ing Duffy's defeat, Clinton 
said that he returned home 
to Arkansas and ran for 
Senate. Clinton, too, was 
unsuccessful. "It's inter- 
esting how both our fail- 



ures in congress led us to 
be presidents," laughed 
Clinton. As he continued, 
it became evident that 
President Clinton wasn't 
simply addressing a group 
of college students, he was 
establishing American 
guidelines for foreign 
trade and investment in 
the future. The talk was 
reported on major net- 
works as a trade talk of 
significant caliber. On that 
day, American University 
shined brightly. 

Although definitely 
one of the highlights, The 
Convocation was not the 
only thing happening 
during the gala Centen- 
nial/Homecoming week. 



26 The Talon 



Jf 




Laying all doubts to rest, 
President Of the United States Bill 
Clinton arrives onstage and greets 
President of the American 
University and old friend Joe 
Duffey. (photo by Matt Lovering) 

A panel of speakers, adressing 
such topics as biodiversity and its 
importance in our ever-changing 
world, discuss these subjects at 
the Environmental Conference 
sponsored by the College of Arts 
and Sciences as it launced it 
launched its new Environmental 
Studies Major.(photo by Matt 
Lovering) 



Campus 27 



v/A^nn\j 



"It's 

interesting 

how both our 

failures in 

congress led 

us to be 

presidents" 

President Bill 
Clinton 



continued from pg. 27 

In the rebirth of a tradi- 
tion, the Homecoming 
committee organized a 
parade and reception on 
the Quad following Presi- 
dent Clinton's remarks. 
The massive snowfall 
which blanketed Washing- 
ton the night before 
couldn't put a damper on 
the activities. Tents 
pitched on the Quad 
handed out free pizza, 
chicken and cake. As the 
snow fell the night before, 
various organizations on 
campus were working 
feverishly on floats to 
recreate the Homecoming 
experience of American's 
past. 

This was only one part 
of the Centennial /Home- 
coming Gala week. Other 
highlights were a Fashion 
Show sponsored by the 
International Student 
Association. And of 
course, no homecoming 
would be complete with- 
out a homecoming dance. 
American University 
threw a Homecoming Ball 



in the Tavern and the 
University Club which 
couldn't be beat, complete 
with American's own 
infamous Whirled Peas. A 
special highlight of the ball 
was Homecoming Coordi- 
nator and SC Vice Presi- 
dent Mike Carroll's fight 
with trustees over the 
presence of liquor at the 
Homecoming Ball. 

If a Homecoming 
dance wasn't your scene, 
there was always the 
option to go to the Home- 
coming Concert. This 
year, The Homecoming 
Committee had quite a 
coup by booking respect- 
able alt-rockers Soul Asy- 
lum hot on the heels of 
their most successful 
album ever. Where else in 
Washington were you 
going to be able to see a 
sensation like Soul Asy- 
lum for free? 

Oh, don't let it be said 
that there wasn't a Home- 
coming game. There was, 
I'm sure. However, Presi- 
dent Clinton's speech was 
continued on pg. 30 





28 The Talon 







Following the Convocation, 
American University went on 
display with the reviving of the 
traditional Homecoming Parade. 
This event was held on Friday, 
February 26, 1993, in a raging 
snowstorm. Many organizations 
were represented in the parade. 
Alpha Kappa Psi, the business 
fraternity came out in full force to 
represent its members, (photo by 
Matt Lovering) 

Flanked by American University 
and national dignitaries such as 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees 
Edward Carr, AU President )oseph 
Duffey and former Senator 
Fulbright, President Clinton delivers 
the keynote address at the 
Convocation of our Centennial 
Celebration, (photo by Matt 
Lovering) 

The Creek organizations at the 
American University figured very 
prominently in the Homecoming 
Parade. Some had floats, while 
others simply walked along the 
parade route greeting students 
along the way. (photo by Matt 
Lovering) 




It has been said that American University has been 
devoid of spirit in the past. Many people fault the 
absence of a football team as the cause of our 
distinct lack of something mythical called "Home- 
coming spirit." This year's Homecoming extrava- 
ganza, football team not needed, made amends. 
One aspect of past Homecomings was the tradi- 
tional Homecoming Parade. This display of 
American's finest was often the highlight of past 
Homecomings, bringing nearly the entire Univer- 
sity out to the Quad to view. 
This year, the Homecoming committee, while still 
emphasizing the important differences that make 
today's American unique and diverse, resurrected 
the Homecoming Parade, complete with floats and 
free food. The new AU Homecoming Parade was a 
smashing success, bringing marchers and floats in 
the spirit of the old, with that touch of diversit 
and style still letting people know that Am 
a University of today. 



Campus 29 



Overall the 

night was a 

mesmerizing 

evening of 

rock and roll, 

San Fran style 



continued from pg. 29 

not the end of the critical 
thought being held in the 
once simple Bender Sports 
Complex. The weekend of 
March 26 brought together 
a meeting of the great 
minds in the field of our 
earth's environment, 
beginning with national 
biologist Peter Raven. 
Raven delivered a keynote 
speech on biodiversity, 



they seriously made 
amends with the Spring 
Concert(s). First was the 
traditional free concert 
featuring Blues Traveler. 
This Bay Area modern 
rock combo, touring late 
behind their combination 
live/studio album "travel- 
ers and theives" rocked 
the Bender Arena with 
their unique brand of 
alternative music. The 



rate with an I.D.) Natalie 
Merchant and the Maniacs 
have been touring exten- 
sively behind their "Our 
Time in Eden" album, 
which is their biggest 
seller to date. The concert 
brought a lot of "Hope 
Chest" era fans back out to 
see the Maniacs and made 
a lot of new fans on the 
way. 




and its greater necessity in 
the future. The conference 
was coordinated by the 
College of Arts and Sci- 
ences to introduce their 
newest major program, the 
Environmental Studies 
major. 

The final function of 
the Bender Arena was a 
slightly more traditional 
one. Although American's 
Student Union Board may 
have stumbled a bit during 
the fall semester, bobbling 
plans for a fall concert, 



first set was a pretty pat 
performance, leaving 
room for a second act of 
extended jams and wild 
improvisation. Overall the 
night was a mesmerizing 
evening of rock and roll, 
San Fran style. 

Finally, the SUB, work- 
ing with local promoters 
I.M.P. brought the amaz- 
ing 10,000 Maniacs. This 
time, tickets weren't free, 
but the show was worth 
every penny. (AU stu- 
dents did get a reduced 



30 The Talon 





Environmental expert Thomas 
Lovejoy introduces a panel of 
colleagues maintaining a 
discussion of critical topics which 
he also moderated. (Talon file 
photo) 

In the height of a torrid second-set 
jam during the Spring Concert at 
Bender Arena, Blues Traveler lead 
guitarist seems to lose himself in 
the music, (photo by Cara 
Cilbride) 

Non-student groups were also 
represented in the parade. The 
staff of the library threw together a 
banner and took to the quad, 
(photo by Matt Lovering) 



Campus 31 



From The 
Four 

Corners 



T 



This Tavern 

was 

guaranteed to 

give us a 

great year, 

and indeed it 

did. 



he Tavern didn't stop at 
simply renovating itself 
and then lying there. 
Nosiree, that would not be 
like our new and im- 
proved Tavern. This 
Tavern was guaranteed to 
give us a great year, and 
indeed it did. 

The Tavern's official 
grand opening was an 
incredible celebration. 
Alternative rock rising star 
Matthew Sweet was the 
guest of honor, giving a 
free show and christening 
the Tavern stage as the 
newest place to see rock 
and roll at AU. The show 
began with Uncle Green, 
who delivered a loud, if 
not strong, set of old- 
fashioned alternative rock. 
Their sound was not as 
crazy as the Ramones, but 
not as trendy as Nirvana. 
Then Sweet took the stage 
with his hand-picked band 
of regulars. Becoming 
somewhat of a sensation 
over a song which was 
nearly not released, "Girl- 
friend," Sweet treated 
American to some great 
music in the Tavern. The 
Concert was sponsored by 
the Tavern and the Stu- 
dent Union Board. 



32 The Talon 





r\y 




Another concert SUB 
brought to the Tavern in 
this, its first year in a new 
and improved form, was a 
Mighty Mighty Boss-Tones 
show. The Boss-Tones, 
hailing from (where else) 
Boston, brought their plaid 
revolution to the Tavern 



loudly and clearly. The 
Boss-Tones sound is a 
unique blend of jazz and 
thrash and whatever else 
is lying around, combined 
to form ska. The Mighty 
Mighty Boss-Tones show 
was a riotous good time, 
continued on pg. 34 




American University's Tavern 
was converted into a Reggae 
festival as the Student Union 
Board, the Caribbean Student 
Association, and UNICEF 
brought Yellowman, replete 
with the aging percussionist for 
a night of mellow island music, 
(photo by Matt Lovering) 



Delivering a decidedly 
alternative aspect of the 
Caribbean sound, a mambo 
band sets the pace with plenty 
of percussion, maracas, bongos 
and various other drum kits. 
(photo by Matt Lovering) 

Bringing a spiritual groove to 
the evening of reggae, a 
Rastafarian awes the Tavern 
crowd with one of many 
moments of power in his 
performance, (photo by Matt 
Lovering) 



Campus 33 



Hating a 

club 

atmosphere, 

the Tavern 

was stocked 

with flashing 

lights and an 

assortment of 

hip-hop DJ's. 




continued from pg. 33 

and if nothing else, it will 
be remembered as the 
birthplace of the first 
moshpit in the new Tav- 
ern. 

Obviously, SUB was 
instrumental in providing 
entertainment to go with 
our shiny new Tavern 
throughout the year. In an 
effort to diversify the 
selection of live music 
available on campus, SUB 
used the Tavern as a 
testing ground for all sorts 



of different acts. SUB 
Concert Chair Chris 
McBride coodinated vari- 
ous different acts in di- 
verse musical genres to 
reach a maximum of AU's 
student body. 

One of these efforts to 
reach more of the student 
body were a series of hip- 
hop shows in the Tavern. 
Emulating a club atmo- 
sphere, the Tavern was 
stocked with flashing 
lights and an assortment 

continued on pg. 36 




34 The Talon 




Laying the groundwork as the 
opening act for Reggae legend 
Yellowman, See-I, delivers 
delightful Jamaican rhythms to a 
mellow Tavern crowd, (photo by 
Matt Lovering) 

The International Student 
Association brought a fashion show 
with all the fixings, including a full 
runway, to the Tavern for the 
Homecoming Fashion Show, held 
in connection with Homecoming 
and Centennial, (photo by Dario 
Nadavian) 



Time Capsule 




IcKinley Building is 
one of mystery and wonder at 
American University. It is 
also a building with a very 
colorful history. The building 
was conceived in the mind of 
John Fletcher Hurst, the father 
of American University. 
When attempting to construct 
this college under the 
oppressive monetary 
guidelines of the Methodist 
Church, he approached then- 
president William McKinley 
in 1 898. He offered the 
president a position on the 
board of trustees and 
pleadged to build a building 
in the name of the president's 
home state, Ohio, if 
McKinley would break the 
ground. McKinley agreed, 
but before the ground could 
be broken, McKinley was 
assassinated. The conerstone 
was laid by McKinley's vice- 
president and successor, 
Theodore Roosevelt, on May 
14, 1902. 

However, Hurst had 
suffered a stoke upon hearing 
the news of Mckinley's death 




and had never recovered. 
The driving force behind the 
fund-raising for American 
was gone, and construction 
on the McKinley building was 
stopped in 1905. Twelve 
years later, in the wake of the 
First World War, The War 
Department continued 
construction, intending to use 
the building as a 
headquarters for chemical 
weaponry research. The 
facility was called Camp 
Leach. Camp Leach changed 
hands within the government, 
first being used as a fixed 
nitrogen research lab, then an 
office of the Department of 
Agriculture, then the Bureau 
of Agricultural Chemistry and 
Engineering. By 1941, the 
government had expended its 
usage of the McKinley 
building and it was leased to 
the C&P telephone com 

In 1954, the '■ 
Building was r< 
American Univi 
renovated al 
$200,000 



Campus 35 



The Tavern 

Renovations 

take a turn for 

the better 




continued from pg. 34 

of hip-hop DJ's. Another 
diverse music style pre- 
sented at the Tavern was 
an amazing couple of jazz 
shows. Billed as simply 
"jazz in the tavern" the 
shows, although poorly 
attended, were great 
indeed. Although Jazz is 
one of the more acquired 
tastes of the music world, 
SUB vowed to continue 
bringing it and other 
different types of music to 
the Tavern. 

Another unique experi- 
ence in the Tavern cour- 
tesy of the Student Union 
Board was a phenomenal 
reggae performance by the 
legendary Yellowman. An 
icon of the reggae commu- 
nity. Yellowman brought 
his distinctive style to a 
very intimate show and no 
one was left disappointed. 

Then came the AU 
mind-boggling Homecom- 



ing Centennial extrava- 
ganza. Events in the 
Tavern included the 
Homecoming Ball and the 
Centennial Concert featur- 
ing Buzz-Clip fodder Soul 
Asylum. 

The Tavern, however, 
was not used only for 
music and shows. Two 
residence halls took to the 
Tavern to hold various 
events. Hughes Hall held 
the now somewhat annual 
Mr. Hughes Hall pageant. 
Anderson came right back 
and celebrated, in the 
height of Centennial 
Week, their selections for 
Mr and Mrs Anderson 
Hall. (See Residential Life) 

Another non-musical 
presentation of the re- 
vamped Tavern stage was 
the International Student 
Association's Fashion 
Show. In honor of the 
Centennial and Homecom- 
ing, the ISA coordinated 




an extravaganza featuring ; 
models from American 
University and some of the 
most incredible outfits 
you've ever seen. 

The Tavern is new and ; 
better than ever. An 
interesting thing to try and 
visualize is any of these 
events being held in the 
old Tavern, having seen 
them in our new and 
improved one. At times, I ] 
can't even remember what 
the old one looked like. 
Thank goodness. 



36 The Talon 




Alcohol Awareness Week 
brought with it morbid images of 
twisted metal and mangled 
bodies in Delta Tau Delta's 
shock therapy method of 
discouraging students from 
drinking and driving, (photo by 
Matt Lovering) 

At a condom information table 
sponsored by the Health Center's 
Peer Health program, a student 
tries his hand at applying a 
condom to a handy model, 
(photo by Matt Lovering) 

Condom Awareness Week swept 
through American University on 
a well-lubricated wave 
surrounding Valentine's Day. 
(photo by Matt Lovering) 



Campus 37 



Colin Powell 
broke more 

ground than 
many of his 

predecessors 
combined. 




A 



The Featured 

Speaker 



merican University has 
once again outdone itself 
in this shining aspect: The 
Kennedy Political Union. 
The KPU is identified as a 
student-funded and oper- 
ated organization, and 
under director Christopher 
Johns, the Kennedy Politi- 
cal Union has advanced its 
mission of bringing politi- 
cal speakers to the Univer- 
sity Community. Mr. 



Johns' personal goal has 
been to expand the scope 
to include all sorts of 
political speakers, not just 
politicians. On this basis, 
members of the media, 
local representatives, 
interest group figures, 
authors, and military 
figures were all presented. 

In light of this school 
year also being an election 
year, many of the speakers 



who addressed the com- 
munity before November 
3 focussed heavily on the 
presidential race. The 
season began with the 
Capital Steps. This sing- 
ing and dancing troupe of 
comedians had no mercy 
in poking fun at every part 
of the government, includ- 
ing the heated race be- 
tween the candidates. 
Their parody of American 



38 The Talon 



■Politics is as fundamental 
as the political system 
itself. Imitation (and 
satire) is the sincerest form 
of flattery. 

The Kennedy Political 
Union also impressed the 
:ommunity with speakers 
of tremendous caliber. 
Former Secretary of State 
Caspar Weinberger, under 
fire before his presidential 
pardon, addressed the 
University on his history 
'in American Government 
and his life in the eye of 
the storm. Another 
speaker who captured the 
fascination of American 
University was Chairman 
af the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 



General Colin Powell. 
Due to the size of the 
crowd drawn by Powell, 
the presentation was held 
in the Metropolitan Me- 
morial United Methodist 
Church across Nebraska 
Avenue from the Univer- 
sity. 

As the youngest Chair- 
man of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff ever, Colin Powell 
broke more ground than 
many of his predecessors 
combined. He is the first 
non-white person to hold 
the position, which is the 
principal military adviser 
to the president and the 
secretary of defense. He 
was born in Harlem and 




raised in the South Bronx, 
a child of Jamaican immi- 
grants. He attended the 
City College of New York, 
serving in a ROTC pro- 
gram. He furthered his 
education at George 
Washington University, 
and passed through the 
military, advancing to his 
current position, the high- 
est attainable. The pri- 
mary emphasis of his talk 
was the amazing advances 
in history that had oc- 
curred in the years since 
he was a student to today, 
as he addressed this new 
generation of students. An 
interesting parallel he 
drew was the fact that the 
president at the time of his 
undergrad education was 
Eisenhower, who deliv- 
ered the first televised 
presidential press confer- 
ence. Colin Powell's 
speech was broadcast on 
C-Span, a network dedi- 
cated exclusively to the 
coverage of political 
events. 

Powell was a signifi- 
cant entry into the 
University's forum be- 
cause of the many issues 
on the American conscious 

continued on pg. 40 




Fielding a question from an 
American University student on 
the uproar concerning the ban 
on homosexuals in the military, 
is Colin Powell explains his 
views on the sensitive issue, 
(photoby Matt Lovering) 

Addressing American University 
Students on the critical balance 
of power still extent in today's 
world, and the new challenges 
facing the United States, former 
National Security Adviser Robert 
McFarlane fields questions from 
the packed Abraham S. Kay 
Spiritual Life Center, (photo by 
Matt Lovering) 

The Kennedy Political Union 
sponsored various forums for 
intellectual thought, ranging from 
world-reknowned speakers to 
this panel discussion of experts 
in the environmental field, 
(photo by Talon Staff) 

(Next Page) Author Joseph Nye, 
whose books are featured 
prominently in the 
International lum, 

inti v ful view of 

..-e of the world political 
photo by Talon Staff) 



Campus 39 



"Hats off to 

the student 

volunteers 

who fill in 

the gaps, iron 

out the 

glitches and 

make KPU 

really work." 

Chris Johns 



continued from pg. 39 

at the time; the election 
raised questions regarding 
homosexuals in the mili- 
tary, harrassment, the 
downsizing of a post-cold- 
war defense, and various 
other important topics. 
Following on these same 
lines, speakers such as 
Alexander Haig, Jr, and 
Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neal. 
Three more speakers who 
had much to say during 
this election year were 
Chairman Richard Bond of 
the Republican National 
Committee, Congressman 
John Anderson, indepen- 
dent presidential candi- 
date in the 1980 election, 
and Paul Tsongas, who 
finished just behind Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton in the 
primary season for the 
Democrats. 

The media was 
strongly represented at 
this year's session at the 
Kennedy Political Union. 
One of the most impres- 
sive speakers was Nina 
Totenberg, National Public 
Radio's Law correspon- 
dent. Her relevence was 
particular in light of the 
return of the Anita Hill 
and sexual harrassment 
issue. (Oregon Senator Bob 
Packwood was accused of 
sexual harrassment in the 
days following the elec- 
tion.) Other media figures 
who addressed the Ameri- 
can University Commu- 
nity were Joseph Nye, Jr, 
whose book on global 
politics figured promi- 
nently in the World Poli- 
tics course, and NPR 
correspondent Daniel 
Schorr. 



One of the most ex- 
panded sections of the 
KPU speaking agenda was 
special interest groups. As 
our society is commanded 
more and more by these 
collectives of ordinary 
citizens, the attention they 
are paid grows. February 
brought Dr. Benjamin 
Hooks, the Executive 
Director of the country's 
largest organization of its 
kind, the NAACP. Two 
speakers whose interest 
group's views are ever in 
collision addressed Ameri- 
can in the month of April. 
They were Phyllis 
Schlafley of the Eagle 
Forum, a family values 
organization, and Patricia 
Ireland, President of the 
National Organization for 
Women. Their topics were 
of great import in this the 
twentieth year of 
America's reliance on Roe 
v. Wade for protection of 
privacy. 

The ever-widening 
scope of the KPU's concen- 
tration also included some 
speakers who could not be 
categorized, but offered 
much to the impact of the 
program. General Ben- 
jamin Davis (Ret.), the first 
African-American general 
in the United States and 
the Commander of the 
WWII Tuskeegee Airmen, 
addressed American on 
overcoming racism. Vir- 
ginia Governor Douglas 
Wilder, the first black man 
to fill the position spoke 
on his experiences as 
governor. One more 
unique speaker was Dr. 
James Watson, of the 
Nobel Prize winning team 




of Watson and Crick who 
developed the first DNA 
model, and former direc- 
tor of the National Human 
Genome project at the 
NIH. Diplomatic corps 
members such as former 
Ambassador to Russia 
Robert Strauss, Ambassa- 
dor in charge of Central 
African Affairs Robert 
Pringle, Disarmament 
Ambassador Kenneth 
Adelman, and Former US 
Ambassador to the United 



40 The Talon 




Nations Jeanne 
Kirkpatrick were all guests 
of the KPU, and political 
luminaries such as Robert 
McFarlane (Reagan's 
National Security Ad- 
viser), Serguei Martynov 
(Charge d' Affaires to the 
US from Belarus), and The 
Honorable Admiral Crowe 
(Former Chair Joint Chiefs 
of Staff). 

One thing that has held 
the KPU together has been 
its staff. They have been 



flexible in times of need 
and have supported the 
Kennedy Political Union 
throughout the year. KPU 
Director Christopher Johns 
said it best, "Hats off to 
the student volunteers 
who fill in the gaps, iron 
out the glitches and make 
KPU really work." 

Tarek N. Rizk 



Time Capsule 



American University has 
always been a cultural 
stronghold in Washington, 
D.C. As well it has been, 
since it was chartered by 
Congress one hundred yeas 
ago, a place associated with 
the politics that live in D.C. 
and the presidents who run it. 
Over the years, twelve 
presidents have spoken or 
otherwise been associated 
with us. 

The first President of the 
United States spoke fondly of 
an idea he had of establishing 
a great "national university" 
here in the nation's capitol. 
John Fletcher Hurst, the 
founder, took advantage of 
this idea when raising funds 
for the initial construction of 
American. The Act of 
Congress which brought us 
into existence was signed by 
the 23rd president, Benjamin 
Harrison. A trustee of 
American University, William 
McKinley, the 25th president 
was assassinated before he 
could break ground on the 
building he conceived, which 
eventually became the 
McKinley-Ohio College of 
Government. His successor, 
Theodore Roosevelt, spoke at 
the dedication and of the 
building, and he filled 
McKinley's space on the 
Board of Trustees, remaining 
there the longest of any U.S. 




president, 20 years. 

In 1914, slightly a ye, 
before the U.S. became 
embroiled in World War One, 
the University formally 
opened with a speech 
delivered by President 
Woodrow Wilson, a teacher 
himself. The next great war- 
time president, Franklin 
Delano Roosevelt, also 
delivered a speech, this time 
at the inauguration of AU's 
6th chancellor. The 
ceremony also included the 
announcement of the 
organization of American's 
School of Public Affairs. 

Dwight D. Eisenhower 
addressed the graduating class 
of 1957, and in the same 
ceremony broke ground for 
American's School of 
International Service. The last 
president to address a 
commencement service was 
President John F. Kennedy 
who spoke to the class of 
1963. Kennedy's speech wsa 
one made in a time of great 
turmoil for the United States 
and contained uplifting words 
of inspiration which have 
been barkened to in the 
twenty years since they were 
spoken. 

These are just some of the 
presidents who have made 
American a willing part of 
their terms and impressions o 
history. 







Campus 41 



No Place To 

Go 



F 



"One event 

which truly 

captures the 

spirit of 

American is 

the Heritage 

Festival" 



or many students here, the 
University is best charac- 
terized by the Quad. The 
Eric A. Friedheim Quad- 
rangle is a center of activ- 
ity every day of the year. 
When students first arrive, 
the Quad is the place of 
every happening; the 
Quad drips with Orienta- 
tion and freshmen don't 
see much beyond it. Fre- 
quently, the Quad is 
flooded with people at 
various times of the day, 
shuffling loudly amongst 
friends and strangers on 
their way to classes. As 
the weather breaks during 
the spring semester, the 
Quad is commonly teem- 
ing with people playing 
various sports, lying 
about, sleeping, and social- 
izing The Quad is the life 
of the University, the 
heart, so to speak, and 
noone can deny that. 

Personal stories about 
the Quad are endless. At 
night the Quad takes on a 
mystical air. Roving 
bands of drunkards wan- 
der across returning from 
forays into the land of 
inebriation, little groups of 
deep-thinkers speak in 




hushed tones, soul-search- 
ers walk alone, all on the 
Quad. At times when one 
is hurrying, late for class, 
thinking of the quad isn't 
important. But just once 
think about all that the 
quad has witnessed. 

One event which truly 
captures the spirit of 
American, and more 
recently captures the Quad 
is the Heritage Festival. 

The American Univer- 
sity can't seem to get over 
the massive quantity of 
multiculturalism which 
runs rampant on its 




42 The Talon 




grounds. There is such an 
array of backgrounds and 
styles that it seems every 
once in a while our phe- 
nomenal variety of cul- 
tures simply bursts open, 
spewing unique perspec- 
tives and unusual back- 
grounds all over the Quad. 
This, of course, is the 
annual American Univer- 
sity Heritage festival. 

The Heritage Festival, 
presented this year as in 
the past in conjunction 
with the Parent's Weekend 
and general-show-off-our- 
university's great extrava- 
ganza was as glorious as 
ever. The official title this 
year was The 1992 Ameri- 
can University Heritage 
Festival: A Cultural Jubi- 
lee!! (exclamation points 
NOT added) And boy, 
was it that. 

The Heritage Festival 
covered the Eric Friedheim 
Quadrangle with a thou- 
sand delights to thrill, 
amuse and slightly reduce 
the weight of your wallet. 
I mean, of course, the 
vendors. They were 
selling trillions of little 
things that you wanted, 
you needed, supported 
some cause, or would 
simply look great on any 
dashboard, rear-view 
mirror, or bookbag. There 
were arts, crafts, various 
ethnic items, food from the 
four corners of American 
University, jewelry and so 
much more. Much of the 
vendor "scene" resembled 
the common view at the 
Grateful Dead Concerts of 
continued on pg. 54 



The 1992 American Univer- 
sity Heritage Festival was 
truly a cultural jubilee. 
Various musical acts were on 
hand to entertain, including a 
jazz ensemble, a latin band, 
and this Reggae band. (photo 
by Matt Lovering) 

The most common use of the 
AU Quad is simply a place to 
rest. The Quad can never be 
found without a smattering of 
students resting, studying or 
even all-out sleeping. (photo 
by Matt Lovering) 



Campus 43 



One event 

which truly 

captures the 

spirit of 

American, is 

the Heritage 

Festival 



continued from pg. 43 
my wild and much less 
poor past. 

Carrying on through 
our cultural jubilee, we 
found performers to 
boggle the mind and 
perplex the body. Perplex- 
ing the body was the 
impressive fire-eater. This 
whole fire-eating thing 
made me nervous, as I 
pictured the worst-case 
scenario, and then imme- 
diately thought about the 
food I had just eaten. I 
moved on. 

Another performing 
act was a series of ethnic 
dancers. There were the 
Hawaiian dancers, who 
did a true and honest 
representation of the 
fabled hula dance. They 
wore authentic Hawaiian 
costume, and they danced 
to very impressive (and 
loud) Hawaiian music. 
Travelling a little further 
from home, there were 
dancers from both India 
and Pakistan. Again, my 
imagination was wildering 
as I realized that for the 
past thirty or so years, 
these two countries have 
been expanding huge 
nuclear arsenals and 
pointing them threaten- 
ingly at each other. So, of 
course, I pictured the 
dancers cutting their 
performances short to 
rumble behind Bender. 
Didn't happen. 

More entertainment 
came in the form of Kung 
Fu artists. There before 
my very eyes, the combi- 
nation of the art of self- 
control and self-defense 



reenacted in the same 
ancient form it had existed 
in for thousands of years. 
Very impressive. Good 
tricks. 

One of the most 
multicultural of the 
multicultural things 
presented was the vast 
array of musical perform- 
ers. The first was a prod- 
uct of American's Per- 
forming Arts department, 
the American University 
Gospel Choir. The Choir 
takes the tradition of 
Gospel Music — real voice 
harmonies, complex vocal 
gymnastics, and phenom- 
enal vocal power — and 
lends to it a modern feel. 
Next, there was the AU 
Jazz Ensemble. Again, 
American University 
presents a classic genre in 
a modern context, produc- 
ing jazz music to groove 
to while eating felafel, 
burritos and egg rolls. 

Two acts were im- 
ported to the Quad for the 
heritage festival. An 
anonymous Reggae Act 
who simply tore up the 
Quad with Jamaican 
rhythms and a true 

continued on pg. 48 



' '■* 





44 The Talon 



Time Capsule 




Shaded from the sun by a 
tall tree, a vendor's table 
attracts the interest of 
anyone sauntering across 
the Quad. (photo by Matt 
Lovering) 

The drama department, led 
by Dr. Caleen Jennings, had 
a space on the agenda for 
AU's Heritage festival when 
it presented a production 
by the Multicultural Theatre 
Ensemble. (photo by Matt 
Lovering) 



In May,1970, America was a nation in tur- 
moil. As The United States become more and more 
embroiled in the Vietnam war, increasingly large 
groups of America's population engaged in various 
forms of dissent regarding the government's stance. 
The most visible and vocal of the groups opposing 
America's presence was the college student popula- 
tion. In the last days of April, student protests at Kent 
State University were halted by violent and unneces- 
sary means. The Ohio National Guard opened fire, 
killing four student protestors. 
The uproar created by the Kent State Massacre was 
felt across the country. American University was no 
exception. In one of a series of demonstrations, 
American University students, who were conducting 
a student strike in an effort to close the University, 
poured onto Ward Circle at the intersection of Ne- 
braska and Massachusetts Avenues. Over 1 ,000 
students, fired by a previous weeks address by a 
congressman favoring U.S. withdrawal and civil 
disobedience Allan Lowenstein (D-NY), took to 
Ward Circle on May 7, 1970 soon after Kent State, 
and meyhem ensued. 280 Metropolitan Police Civil 
Disturbance Unit officers were dispatched to the 
scene. Although only 1 7 students were arrested, 3 
police officers were hurt and countless AU students 
were cared for in emergency medical facilities set up 
in Mary Craydon Center and Kay Chapel. On that 
particular day, the Metro Police fired tear gas at 
fleeing protestors, landing gas bombs on the Quad as 
far as the front steps of Mary Graydon Center. 

Although the student strike did not actually 
close classes, the fervor of American University's 
opposition to the Vietnam war situation was evident 
throughout that critical and violent era. 







IAY0ON CENTER 



Campus 45 



The 
Welcome 

Wason 



A 



merican University has 
always been fond of cer- 
emony, but never simply 
for ceremony's sake. The 
University traditionally 
greets each new year and 
new class of freshmen 
with a service celebrating 
the spirit of American 
University. This celebra- 
tion, known as Opening 
Convocation, is less formal 
than most, and this infor- 
mality begins with the 
setting: Woods-Brown 
Amphitheatre. The open 
air forum is ideal for the 
late-summer staging of the 
Opening Convocation. 
This year, the ceremony 
was held on the second of 
September, 1992. 

The Convocation began 
with bagpiper Bobby 
Mitchell. Mitchell led a 
parade of students carry- 
ing the flags of all the 
nations and banners com- 
memorating the spirits of 
American: diversity, 
involvement, service and 
inquiry. The flags and 
banners were assembled in 
a brilliant array behind the 
podium. Then the official 
welcome commenced. 




Master of Ceremonies 
Maurice J. O'Connell 
greeted and welcomed the 
audience. Then, in a 
tradition begun in convo- 
cations past, O'Connell 
had new members of 
American's community: 
freshmen, new faculty and 
new administration stand 
up and be greeted. Then 
O'Connell introduced the 
various personalities 
assembled behind him. 
After the introductions, 
O'Connell yielded the 
podium to various persons 



who represented different 
aspects of the University. 
The first speaker was the 
president of the Alumni 
Association, Gail Abbot. 
The list of speakers pro- 
gressed: President of the 
School of Public Affairs, 
Carrie Doyle, President of 
the Graduate Student 
Council, Sarah Haden, 
President of the Student 
Confederation, Frank 
Rose, Administrative 
Adviser for Student Ac- 
tivities, Todd Shaver, 
Chairperson of the Univer- 



46 The Talon 




sity Senate, Mary Gray, 
and since-departed Vice- 
Provost Milton Greenberg. 
The final speaker was 
University President 
Joseph Duffey. 

Although long, the list 
of speakers was designed 
to bring out a special 
theme in this official 
opening of our hundredth 
year. The theme in addi- 
tion to a message of wel- 
come was a reiteration of 
the spirits of American 
University. Each of the 
addressees aimed their 
words at explaining one of 
the spirits, or citing their 
own commitment to them. 
With many, the commit- 
ment was self-evident: 
volunteers, students dedi- 
cating their time to better- 
ing other student's lives 
and exemplary faculty 
members. These people as 
much their acts as their 
words express true com- 
mitment to the Spirits of 
American. 



The Eric A. Frieclhiem 
Wuadrangle wears many 
different hats through the year, 
from meeting place to market 
place. Vendors can often be 
found peddling their wares on 
warm days., (photo by Dario 
Nabavian) 

Truly communing with 
Nature, sophomore Matt 
Prudente finds that this finals 
week blanket of the white stuff 
brings out the snowbunny in 
him. (photo by Matt Lovering) 



Campus 47 



Diversity and 

life on the 

Quad go 

hand in 

hand. 



continued from pg. 44 

Rastafarian message, 
which was completely 
illegal on campus. An- 
other off-campus act was a 
Latin Band, who carelessly 
tossed out vibes that could 
very well have compelled 
someone to lambada. Not 
me, of course. 

One of the most im- 
pressive features of the 
heritage festival also came 
from the Performing Arts 
Department. Calleen 
Jenning's Multicultural 
Theatre Ensemble demon- 
strated that drama tran- 
scends all cultural bound- 
aries. 

A major difference 
between this year's heri- 
tage festival and festival's 
past is the fact that this 
year's heritage festival 
exploded onto the Quad, 
as opposed to the Woods- 
Brown Amphitheatre. 
This move facilitated 
another change: a helluva 
lot more stuff. The Heri- 
tage festivals of the 
Woods-Brown 
Amphitheatre era in- 
volved a lot of cramped 
tables and tricky maneu- 
vering around the step- 
like formation, however, 
this year, you were free to 
flail about on the amaz- 
ingly vast Eric Friedheim 
Quadrangle. Nothing like 
it. 

Finally, a great deal of 
credit needs to be given to 
those organizations who 
lent their time and support 
to this amazingly cultural 
jubilee. The list is huge, I 
won't write it. 

Tarek N. Rizk 




&ILEPSY FOUHOF>< 



FOR THF 




ITAL AB 



'"* ""S."' 




\' ~*> 



U 




48 The Talon 




Greek life on campus takes a 
turn for the worse as American 
University's chapter of Zeta 
Beta Tau stages a Jail-and Bail 
fundraiser for The National 
Capital Area Epilepsy 
foundationm.( photo by Matt 
Lovering.) 

As the temperature increases, 
so does the need for students 
to enjoy the bright, sunny 
days. Aside from the Quad, 
there are many different places 
to bask in nature's beauty, 
such as the grassy area behind 
the SIS Annex and the 
Wooks- Brown 
Amphitheatre. (photos by 
Talon staff) 

Although usually used for a 
break from classroom discus- 
sions, the quad can also serve 
as a forum for serious intellec- 
tual discourse, (photo by Matt 
Lovering) 





^AW** -:3 




CMS -•£:.. ft* 



Campus 49 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 



1893 - 1993 




Dancing Till They 
Are Home 

1992 Fall Dance Concert Moves 
in Modern and Personal Ways 



*-^ nder the artistic direction of Suzanne 
Carbonneau, and depsite the dancing cows on 
the playbill, the performeres in AU's Fall Dance 
Concert proved to be anything but large and 
heavy-footed. Much of the show took a modern 
dance style, as opposed to the variety of dance 
styles in past concerts. But the pieces ,which 
were mostly choreographed by students, carried 
a lot of depth and showcased the creative talents 
that endow this university. 

The show opened with Jeff Rebudal in 
"Gemini"- a jazzy, up-beat piece choreographed 
by Rebudal himself. Wynton Marsalis' "Some- 



times It Goes Like That" weaved through the 
background as Rebudal slinked his way around 
the stage. With his sharp, jazzy arms and fluid 
body movements, Rebudal created a street seen 
for the audience. There was a "West Side Story' 
feel to his jumps and slithery steps. Rebudal's 
movements were sensual and brassy, much like 
a saxophone. "Gemini" was so on the cutting 
edge of jazz and blues, Rebudal could have 
easily broken out of his slinking and into a tap 
jam. 

From jazz to the graceful and poetic flighl 
of the "Seagull",performed by Maryse Jacobs 



52 The Talon 



(who was also the show's costume designer) and Jacques 
Burgering. The "Seagull" added a romantic, blue hue to the 
I dance. Subtle contractions and long, twisting arms accentu- 
iated the image of a seagull. Jacobs and Burgering worked 
, well together, and considering that they were both the tallest 
(jdancers in the show, both were well matched and compli- 
nmentary. "Losing Touch", performed by Yael Levy and 
'Timothy Wilmott, touched on a failing relationship and 
expressed the confused feelings of each counterpart through 
innovative modern dance movements. Both dancers were 
very strong in technique and were absolutely dynamic on 
stage. Silence, with a smattering of random whispers like 

Why are doing this to me?" and "Where are you going?", 
was the sound to which the dancers flung out and con- 
tracted their confusion and mental torment. Death-defying 
spins and solidly held images were highlights in the piece. 

Losing Touch" was dance at its dramatic best without be- 
ing melodramatic. Levy and Wilmot played their bodies 
honestly, and maintained a warm and intimate presence on 
stage. 

Lori Clark (aka. The Lovely Yasmina [as stated in the 
playbill]) found a creative way to use her answering ma- 
chine messages. "Slice of My Life" was exactly that: a slice 
of Lori Clark's life according to her messages. Clark 
pantomined a variety of characters, bringing life to the 
voices on her machine. The piece was light-hearted and, 
many times, comical. Clark wore a very ethnic attitude 
about her. Her presence is both captivating and mystical. 
Rumor has it that Clark belly dances on the side: Well, it 
shows, her hips and arms are most fluid. 

Maryse Jacobs returned onstage with an earthy piece 

continued on page 54 



IN TOUCH* (opposite page) 
Maryse Jacobs gets in touch with her 
memories in"Herinneringen (Memo- 
ries)." (thispage) Yael Levy and Tim 
Wilmot express the trials of a failing 
relationship in "Losing Touch." 
(PhototsbyKenCobb) 



" When emotion is too 
much for simple 

movement 

that's when Dance 

begins." 

— Anonymous 





Arts 53 




TWO TYPES OF 

C H A R M • ( top ) The Lovely 
Yasmina (aka Lori Clark) does 
the ethnic pose, (bottom) Mark 
Simpson and Tim Wilmot find 
the light. (Photos bv Ken Cobb) 



titled "Herinneringen (Memories)." She mentions to the audience: 
remember my father as a singer." Jacobs movements expressed 
anguish and mourning. Her silent screams and facial expressions 
gave the piece a very sentimental tone. The scrim behind her was a- 
lit with a shadow of a blooming tree. "Herinneringen" was a 
simple, somber and haunting performance by Jacobs. 

In "Light Music," two of AU's lighting design specialists- 
Tim Wilmot and Mark Simpson- got a chance to strut their stuff. 
This was Simpson's debut on-stage at AU, he usually goes un-seen, 
As he is "Mr. Technical" for the DPA, overseeing many of the 
lighting and set design for most of the shows at AU. Wilmot and 
Simpson focused less on dance plot and concentrated more on the 
various ways one can play with stage light. The piece itself was 
broken up into "Allegro," "Moderato," "Vivace," and "Poco Ada- 
gio" displaying different paces and levels of light-use. Limbs, head 
and torso peeked in and out, weaving in between the rays of stage 
lights. It was communicated through the piece that knowing the 
dynamics of light and how to use light is almost as important as 
knowing the dance itself. Light has a language all its own, as 
Simpson and Wilmot so eloquently explained through their move- 
ments. 

The most energy busted onto the stage for the finale piece, 
which was choreographed by guest artist Doug Elkins. Elkins hails 
from New York City where he is artistic director and founder of his 
own company. He has been the recipient of many significant grants 
among them are grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, 
the National Performance Network, Dance Magazine Foundation 
and NYSCA. His company received its first company grant from 
the NEA in 1991. Elkins is a popular and well-respected choreogra- 
pher. Vibrant, young, and hip Elkins' works reflects his own wack] 
personality and imaginative fun with movement. "Sarah Nod... 
(Nocturnal Intermissions)" aroused the audience's light side when 
it, literally, jumped out on stage with the comment: "If it's not 
Scottish, it's crap!" The dancers: Galeet BenZion, Maryse Jacobs, 
Lori Clark, Monica Chelsak, Amy Malkin Filderman, Gillian Finley 
Tim Wilmot, Jeff Rebudal, and Jacques Burgering skipped and 
jigged to the whining of Scottish pipes. The movement was very 
aerobic, jumping from a tradtional-looking routoine to a hip and 
funky version of the same movement. Elkins' chemistry between 
fun and art was well proportioned. Much of the movement was 
clear and comical, and certainly done with a special flair of absudit 
that is clearly Elkins'. Mind you, the dancers had only two weeks o 
intense rehersals with Elkins to learn the piece, and it turned out to 
be a great a success. 

At the end, the audience had as much fun as the dancers 
seemed to be having on stage. The Fall Dance Concert '92 was a 
pleasant showcase of the talent and variety of personality that AU' . 
Deparment of Performing Arts has to offer. And after the concert, 
you realize that the DPA and all its talented performers will be 
"dancing 'til the cows come home." # 



-written by A.G. Cantor 



54 The Talon 




AU Players are... 

ON A 

ROLE 



U Players is the American 
University Student Thespian Orga- 
nization, through which students 
can be at there "thespian-est" by 
directing original scripts, producing 
.their own show, almost everything 
is student-run. 

This year the organization 
was managed by the collaborative 
and creative minds of Sarah 
'Ekstrom, Tony SanFilippo, and 
Dave Umlas. The year kicked off 
with a running start with 
"Shakespeare in the Ampitheater". 
Students were treated to the young 
'talents who brought to life scenes 
,from Taming of The Shrew, Hamlet, 
Much Ado About Nothing and 
other works by the great English 
playwright, who we'll just call 
"Bill". 

The annual Originals Festival 
was a great success this spring, with 
a weekend of packed houses when 
in the past years attendance had 
been low. Originals Festival is put 
forth every year to showcase origi- 
nal works and plays directed by 
students. "Mind Over Matter" 
written by Sarah Ekstrom/directed 
by Tony San Fillipo entered the 
world of a grown up child and his 
imaginary friend. The brilliant 
acting by Dave Ortman, Abigail 
Karp, Greg Hardigan, Karen Graci, 
Katie Bannar, and Jessica Ripper 
made such scenes as "3-Ring Cir- 
cus" flow smoothly. Dave Umlas 
directed a play by Douglas Schultz 
named "Endings", which journeyed 
into the psyche of a woman under- 
going psychiatric help. Wendy Berry 
played the woman in the one-char- 



acter show. The Festival was com- 
pleted with "Dinner for Two?" with 
Liz Skillman, Keith Bonar, and 
Brian Lebensberger. The play was 
written by Jessica Sandler and co- 
directed by Dave Umlas. 

An a cappella group thrown 
together by Chris Dilley, Anita 
Willis, Adam Reynolds, and Katie 
Bannar even sang a few bars in- 
between shows during the Festival. 
The made such an impression that 
they were asked to sing for the 
Senior Thesis night with "Size 
Matters" and "The Private Eye" and 
were also requested by Gail 
Humphries-Breeskin (director of 
theater at the DP A) to perform for a 
memorial service in the D.C. area. 

Members of Players and the 
casts of "Size Matters" and "The 
Private Eye" got together and had a 
painting party in the Cassell Acting 
Studio. The goal was to paint the 
entire room black to give a "black 
box" theater effect in time for the 
performance, which was the first 
weekend in April. With pizza and 
determination as their fuel, the 
student-actors reached their goal 
that night: they successfully 
brushed and rolled and splattered 
black paint all over the acting 
studio. ..as well as themselves. 

Anything can happen. The 
AU Players are known for their get 
'em and go style;self-initiative is 
widely abundant here. It's AU 
Players secret to success in the 
creative world- and hopefully that 
attitude will take them to high 
heights in the REAL world. # 

written bii A. G. Cantor 



(right) Tony 
SanFilippo and 
Dan Schacner in 
Tamingofthe 
Shrew , gangster- 
style, (below) 
Actors create the 
perfect picture 
of the 
Shakespearean 
family, as 
audiences (top) 
gather in the 
ampitheater to 
watch, 
(photos by Matt 
Lovering) 





TIME CAPSULE: 

On February 1, 1963, AU Players 
performed Edward Albee's The 
Zoo Story in the Theater Annex. 
The play is now forbidden , by 
Albee, to be performed by college 
students. 



Arts 55 







\ 




STAR-CROSSED LOVERS'SeniorDave 

Warren explodes as "Jake." (inset)Greg Hardigan as 
"Mike" comforts his shaken sister "Beth", played by 
Johanna Gerry. (Photos by Matt Lovering) 



OF THE 

MIND 



DPA 

Takes 

ON 

Shepard 

A Critique 

by 

April G. Cantor 



1 he Experimental Theatre was hum- 
ming with anticipation and a full house for 
the Saturday night performance of A Lie of 
the Mind, which was written by Sam 
Shepard and directed by Gail Humphries- 
Breeskin. Having made it to the show's 
call-backs and seeing the show in it's 
developing stage, I was torn between 
being excited and nervous as I tried to sit 
calmly under the twang of the western 
ballads played overhead. But when the 
lights finally faded into blackness, my 
heart only thumped faster... and my heart 
stayed that way -at that pace- throughoi. 
the entire three-hour show and ever 
the house lights came up at the < 
the kind of theatrical experience A Lie of 
the Mind turned out to be. 

Arts 57 



A Lie of the Mind is typically 
Shepard: the tragic, pessimistic, con- 
temporary picture of dysfunctional 
and abusive relationships, which are 
recurring messages in all of 
Shepard's plays. The play revolves 
around two lovers, Beth and Jake, 
and their families which are them- 
selves as incapable of coping with 
certain realities and are as abusive 
and dysfunctional as the young 
couple. It's my view that there 
are no main characters, because 
each character is just as pivotal 
and essential as the other, but 
Jake and Beth are the two cen- 
tral characters. They both rep- 
resent the disturbed youth who 
inherit the hidden secrets and 
insanity of their families. 
There's almost an equal 
amount of time and quality that 
each character presents on 
stage, which is Shepard's bril- 
liance in showing that destruc- 
tion of the human mind hits 
everyone, it is not targeted to 
one couple or group. Lie is 
supposedly a chronicle of 
Shepard's own personal life: 
he addresses feeling isolation 
from his family, his need for 
escape, and his suppressed 
anger. Shepard warns the au- 
dience that buried secrets and lies (hence the title) will 
always be a abominable presence in one's life, and will 
eventually "surface to demand confrontation and partial 
reconciliation."* 

Basically, the plot goes like this: Jake has beaten 
up Beth in one of his jealous fits. Jake thinks he has 
killed her, but actually Beth, who suffers from injuries 
to her brain, is recovering in a hospital with the help of 
her brother, Mike. Frankie (Jake's brother) in the mean 
time, goes to Beth's parents' house to find out if Beth is 
alive, and gets shot by Baylor (Beth's father, who mis- 
takes him for a deer). While Jake is finding out ways to 
escape his room and the annoyance of his mother, 
Lorraine, Frankie is trapped in Baylor's home with a 
bloody leg and is seduced by Beth who thinks he's Jake. 
With Sally's help Jake escapes, and Sally and Lorraine 
dig up some old memories about Jake's father's death; 

58 The Talon 



"... I gradually be- 
came emotionally 
drained as if the ac- 
tors had dragged me 
along with them..." 



the two have it all out and then 
they reconcile. Jake makes it to 
Baylor's place, and is then 
"captured" by Mike who forces 
him to apologize to Beth, who 
in the meantime has proposed 
to marry Frankie. A defeated 
Jake tells Beth he loves her, and 
then leaves her to be with 
Frankie (who wants out and 
badly needs medical help). 
Lorraine and Sally set their 
house on fire and watch it 
go up in flames as they 
prepare a new life for 
themselves. Meanwhile, 
back at Beth's house, Mike 
leaves, and Beth and her 
family go on as if nothing 
unusual has happened. 

It was really interest- 
ing to see how the charac- 
ters were developed since 
call backs. Johanna Gerry 
already had a pretty good 
grasp on Beth during the 
scene-readings at call backs, 
and the final result simply 
showed a greater depth of 
emotion and solid work on 
a complex character. Her 
eyes were very expressive 
and she flowed smoothly 
from heart-wrenching 
screeches to child-like giggles and innocence. Johanna 
dove into total emotional commitment and crafted a 
beautiful portrayal of Beth. Dave Warren played a 
convincingly violent-tempered Jake, who was emotion- 
ally a little boy in a big man's body. His tantrums were 
explosive at best. Warren was fun to watch with his 
funny antics (high heels walk and his rubber face- eyes 
were constantly alert), and he made some nice choices 
in line delivery; the raspiness of his voice actually 
added texture to the character. Lorraine was solidly 
portrayed by Mary Beth Levrio as the hard-assed, jaded 
mother. The constant image I saw with Lorraine was of 
a military general. Levrio was rigid in her movement 
and had a tone of indifference and coldness when she 
spoke. Along with her demanding voice and presence, 
these choices were quite appropriate for Lorraine. 

Frankie, played by Barry Blumenfeld, carried a 




nice presence on stage. He became the character the audience felt most sorry for: 
beaten with shoe, pushed and shoved, and then shot in the leg, Frankie took a lot of 
lickin' . Barry did a fine job of making specific choices, like biting his nails and re- 
sponding with long-lipped pouts, showing that Frankie is high-strung but restrains 
any violent tendencies. Frankie is soft-hearted and "just wants to do the right 
thing."** Greg Hardigan played the other soft-hearted brother, Mike. Greg played 
the complex levels of Mike: the caring brother, the unappreciated son, protector 
against the enemy. The couple of Meg and Baylor (played by Ann Mezger and 
KevinRobertson) supplied the comic relief from the intensity of the play, and the 
chemistry between the two seemed to work well. Sally , along with Frankie, were the 
only "normal" people in the play, and I felt that Sarah Schnadig came across as a 
consistent and very focused actress. She never dropped the end of lines and her 
actions were deliberate and strong. On the whole the entire cast did a fantastic job of 
playing the realism of the play. 

The arrangement of the theater (as in Black Box Theater fashion with the 
audience curved around the edges of the stage) kept the atmosphere intimate and up- 
close. A ramp extended from the stage and into the middle aisle of the audience. 
Many entrances came in through the audience or down the ramp, thereby involving 
the audience in the space of the play. The stage was divided into two sets- left stage 
was reserved for scenes involving Jake and his family; right stage involved mostly 
Beth and her family (the hospital and house scenes). Frankie is the only character, 
except for Jake in the end, who crosses the border and enters both spaces. Keeping the 
spaces separate let the audience see the two different worlds of Jake and Beth, yet 
both reflected each other throughout the show and the audience could easily compare 
the two. Action of the play alternates from one side to the next- like a ping-pong 
match. Lights would fade on and off each transition into the next scene keeping the 
flow of the play smooth. Brilliant mood colors of red (the beaten up Beth), and purple 
and blue haze (as Lorraine talks about the hot, dry winds) painted a complete and 
pleasing picture for the audience, thanks to the lighting mastery of Mark Simpson. 
Simpson also gave nice images in the beginning when vague spotlights barely lit the 
faces of Frankie and Jake, setting a mood of obscurity and a sense of limbo as Jake 
tries to tell Frankie over the phone about beating up Beth. A large, red, jagged line 

continued on page 60 





UNLIKELY 
COUPLES«(top right) 
Baylor (Kevin Robertson) and 
Meg (Ann Metzger) have a 
loving spat, (bottom right) 
Frankie takes verbal abuse by 
his mother Lorraine (Mary Beth 
Levrio). (left) Jake shows how 
much he loves his sister Sally 
(Sarah Schnadig) Shepard-style. 
(Photo by Matt Lovering) 



Arts 59 



was lit on the back scrim as a border between the two 
sides of the stage. I felt that it symbolized the destruc- 
tion of the relationships and the "falling apart at the 
seams." As the play continued the "crack" got larger, 
and by the end of the show it was not only vertical but 
now the crack made a "T" shape, as if the ceiling was 
now crumbling. For me,the crack further separated the 
families and gave a vivid image of demise and destruc- 
tion, in both emotional and physical terms. 

Costumes were realistic and complimented the 
characters. Baylor and Mike were always in flannel or 
hunting gear. Lorraine was dated by her late 60' s /early 
70's style of clothing. The costumes were not in-fashion, 
or expensive, showing the lower middle-class character- 
istics of each family. The sets were simple and easily 
interchangeable. And then thinly, almost transparent, 
walls were brought in for the last two acts. The invisible 
and transparent walls helped set the picture of unreal- 
ity and the lack of stability in both worlds. The stage 
furniture gave simple pictures of home life and a hotel 
couch easily folded out into Jake's bed. The hanging 
airplane models were a cute touch, and I found it fasci- 
nating to be gently dropped into the fantasy world of 
Jake's childhood. The action of the play was nicely 
spiced with the original compositions of Mark Anduss. 
Anduss' synthesized rhythms and pulsing beats were 
exciting and definitely heightened the action and mood 
of the show. Chime-like, lighter melodies accented the 
lines of the show and helped the scenes flow into each 
other. My own feelings during the show were definitely 
affected by the music- front excitement to being lullaby- 
ed into a disturbing clamness. I also liked how the 
action from one scene continued while the lights came 
up on the next scene. This signified the continuity of 
lives: that these two worlds /lives existed simulta- 
neously ,but separately. Even during intermission, 
action would subtly continue onstage, never really 
allowing the audience to break from the intensity of 
these characters' lives. 

On a scale from 1 to 5 (five being the 
highest="excellent"), I generously give this production 
a 5 for keeping me on the edge of my seat for three 
hours. Okay, so maybe my rear started to hurt by the 
third hour, but I was too drawn into the action on stage 
that I really didn't notice. Even though I felt Shepard 
had written some scenes too long, the actors kept me 
involved and wanting to see more. After each scene, I 
gradually became emotionally drained as if the actors 
had dragged me along with them. To me, everything 
was beautiful, and I was quite impressed with how far 

60 The Talon 



GLIMPSES FROM THE 
SHOW* (top) Mike warns Beth 
to stop talking about Jake, (bottom) 
Jake vents his fury to Frankie. 
(Photo by Matt Lovering) 





VJN 



the production had progressed from call backs. One 
could definitely see the results of eight weeks of re- 
hearsals, each actor seemed to have a good grasp on the 
psychological aspects of their character. A Lie of the Mind 
is a tough play for any college theater to produce, but I 
think this cast hurdled all the obstacles, and more. My 
heart is still throbbing. # 

a quote from the program, The Dramaturge's Note written by 
Rebecca Watt. 

* a quote from the program, Program Note written by Professor 
Tim Kelly of the Psychology Department. 



Passages : 



'This corner of our Arts Section is dedi- 
cated to the great artists who have passed 
away this year, 1992-1993. for their 
dedication to their craft and their major 
contributions to the arts world, zue extend 
our appreciation. 

I9i t R£M<E<M r B%WHC'E Of: 

• 'The "first fady" of American theater, 
HELEN HAYES (1901-1993) 

• 'Batfet superstar, RUDOLF 
NUREYEV ( 1 938- 1 993) 

•'The master trumpet and horn player of 
jazz, Dizzy Gillespie (1917- 
1993) 

• u< My fair Lady, "AUDREY 
HEPBURN, who is also known for her 
humanitarian workjwith 'WNJCE'J. 




DID YOU KNOW... 

Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy, 
Broadway's most likable couple, came to 
The American University on Sunday, 
May 3, 1964. They discussed the problems 
of acting in Shakespeare in the Clendenen 
Theater 

(which is now the Ilene Zatkin-Butler 
Garden) at 3:30 in the afternoon. 






ON THE 



Levrio Journeys into new 
semester 



V^ n The Verge or The Geography 
of Yearning by Eric Overmyer wel- 
comed the new faces that had just 
arrived for the fall semester. It was 
one of the events planned for Fresh- 
man Orientation weekend. This was 
one project graduate fellow Mary 
Beth Levrio probably had no idea 
she would find so abominable. 
Directing this fascinating script 
about a journey of three women 
through time and evolution was a 
great ambition of Levrio's, but in the 
process of the production she even- 
tually became not only the director, 
but the producer, public relations 
representative AND set builder. 
With the help of fellow graduate 
Mark Simpson (who undertook the 
roles of set and light designer as 
well as public relations and set 
builder) the two made a quite pow- 
erful team. Their heap of hard work 
really paid off, along with the dedi- 
cated talents of Ann Mezger, Susan 
Snyder, Johanna Gerry and Chris 
Dilley who remained in DC for the 
summer-long rehearsals. The show's 
set was a sight- it was one of the 



largest sets ever built in the Experi- 
mental Theater. Mark Simpson had 
designed a semi-circle cove of rock. 
The cast and crew (all eight of them, 
including Levrio's husband) spent 
late hours sculpting the mountain of 
wire and then plastering paper 
mache sheets over it to give it a rocky 
texture. The set along with the transi- 
tions of the lights (created out of the 
genius of Mark Simpson) moved the 
actresses through time and space, 
into new worlds and decades with 
ease and believablity. The direction 
of Levrio was quite exceptionable; 
she had a certain gift of insight that 
allowed her to understand the 
subtext of the script and she was then 
able to convey her ideas to her actors 
in specific, concrete directions. Every 
scene was as equally intriguing as the 
next and the actors and actresses held 
their audiences' attention and their 
emotions in the palm of their hands. 



written by April G. Cantor 



I 



Journal En- 
tries of A 
Stage Man- 
ager- on THE 
Verge... 
Suzanne M. 
Cam bode 



'July 27, 1992 9:00pm 
'Production meeting #3. 
Today was insane, this is 
my first major stage 
management position. The 
shoiu is going to be 
e\tremely complicated — 
we 'vejust Begun discuss- 
ing light and sound 
plots — I 'm looking at over 
a hundred cues and many 
of them simultaneous. I'm 
scared to death — / don 't 
want to mess this up!!! 

.'August 6, 1992 11:00pm 
We 're less than two xoeeks 
from opening and I still 
have no rehearsal cas- 
settes, no running crew, 
and very little money to 
buy props. I hope that I 
can call in favors on my 
friends to get some 
assistance. "Xpt only am I 
stage manager, but I'm 
props mistress. I m not the 
only one filing myself, 
'Marybeth is director and 
in charge of 'P% and fund 
raising. 'Marf^Simpson is 
designing the set and the 
lights, and is also a one 
man crew, and what a 
set!!!!! 

August 13, 1992 12:00am 
'The set is finally done — it 
looks amazing. 'The cast is 
wonderful — we re 
together every day for 
countless hours — and we 
still always get along. 



62 The Talon 



They ve. made this incredibly stress fd job 
so much easier — / wouldn 't have survived 
this far without them!! 

August 20, 1992 3:00am 
1'1'c open in less than tivo days and I stdf 
do not have amy cassettes — / 've never 
called a shozt ' and I ve had no practice 
with timing sound cues — I'm going crazy 
and am out for blood — but Marybeth is 
confident in me — so 1 guess I '[[stop 
ripping my hair out. We just left the 
theater, -we finished making the [ast prop!! 
fflpthing iiicc [ast minute preparations. 

August 26, 1992 10:00 am 
Tonight is opening night. I haven 't been to 
bed yet — / can get two hours of sleep 
before I have to go to work. — and then 
it 's straight to the theater! I think.it 's 
yoing to be zvonderful, the set is ready, the 
actors are brilliant, and 1 fOl&JjD A 
C^EW.'H So I don 't have to go crazy 
with moving props and scene and costume 
changes. So all I have to worry about is 
the 69 [ight cues, and tlie set changes — 
/ m so scared!!! 

August 31, 1992 4:30 am 'lost 'Mortem 
This has been the 'BTST theater experience 
I've ever had — even with all' the difficul- 
ties. 'The people made the show — the odds 
xuere against us in. time, money, and man 
power — but every one did so much beyond 
their job descriptions. We've just finished 
strike — / can honestly say that On The 
Verge is one the best shows that All has 
ever done. The audiences [ovedit — and so 
many freshmen came and said that they 
are interested in doing theater here. 'Weil, 
it's four o'clock.in the morning and 
tomorrow the fall semester starts. Audi- 
tions for the fall season are being held- — 
and the cycle is starting. I thinly I want to 
make Stage 'Management my theater 
career. Which scares me even more! I don 't 
know if I will be able to handle the 
constant stress of S'M-ing for the rest of 
my life, but I'm going to try! On The 
Verge of my future — 



L_ arge dining halls and ball- 
rooms, streamers and lights 
stretched across the ceiling, candlelit 
tables sprinkled with confetti; digni- 
taries, celebrities and ambassadors 
as your applauding audience- 
Sound like a night of glamour and 
excitement in all the ritz of D.C.? It 
is in atmospheres like these that 
AU's premiere performance com- 
pany, Pizzazz, was most comfort- 
able, and was at their glittery best. 
This singing and dancing troupe of 
performers originated in the spring 
of 1988, under the direction of Gail 
Humphries-Breeskin. After an 
experience at the American College 
Musical Festival, Gail was inspired 
to form a musical theatre troupe. She 
held auditions and selected 12 of the 
most competent AU singers and 
dancers. One day Caleen Jennings 
came up with the name "Pizzazz" 
and the rest is history. The troupe's 
biggest influences were Rodgers and 
Hammerstein tunes; they perform a 
variety of medleys ranging from The 
Best of Broadway, International, and 
Americana. 

We are.. 



This year Pizzazz had the chance to 
perform with Miss America at the 
Benefit for Grandma's House held in 
the Four Seasons Hotel,Georgetown. 
Local Fox news anchor Lark 
McCarthy was the mistress of cer- 
emonies for the evening. Members 
of Pizzazz sang together with Miss 
America and the Bethesda Academy 
of the Performing Arts Children's 
Choir for a televised performance. 
The benefit was a great success. 

Pizzazz premiered at the 20th 
anniversary celebration for the 
David L. Kreeger Building, one of 
AU's two theatre stages. But the 
company's professional track began 
with a debut in the Eastman Kodak 
July 4th celebration. Since then the 
group has had the honor to perform 
at such noteworthy events as the 
Young President's Organization 
Holiday Celebration, the 
Ambassador's Ball, at a reception for 
Vice President Quayle, and a Help 
for the Homeless benefit with 
Dionne Warwick. Choreographed 
by senior Brett Smock, Pizzazz has 
grown to 20 members and continues 
to sprinkle their golden perfor- 
mances over D.C. audiences. # 





Q3^ 2^ 



l ^3^, 



( 





Arts 63 



R 



AT THE 




"A pearl cannot be 
created without some 
kind of irritant." 
- Dr. Pearl E. Primus 



American and Howard Students Come Together 



n rom September 13th through 
December 12th a handful of stu- 
dents from Howard University and 
American University came together 
to work with the renowned 
pioneeress of dance, Dr. Pearl E. 
Primus. With the efforts of AU 
dance professor Naima Prevots and 
Howard University, a grant from the 
Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Arts 
Partners Program (administered by 
the Association of Performing Arts 
Presenters) was put forth to produce 
a show commensurating the life's 
work of Dr. Pearl E. Primus. Alto- 
gether 17 students, hand selected by 
Dr. Primus herself, dedicated three 
months of their lives to perform an 
experience of a lifetime. From the 



anxiety of the auditions, through the 
grueling hours of rehersal, these 
students made their journey to- 
gether and found their way to the 
excitement of performing in front of 
a full house at The Kennedy Center. 
Here's the story (from a dancer's 
perspective) of the making of "50 
Years of Dance- The Works of Pearl 
E. Primus"... 

SEPTEMBER 13, SUNDAY 1992 
I'm just getting over my flu, and I 
was crazy enough to try out for this 
thing and even crazier to have 
actually made it! I'm not even sure 
what this thing's all about- 1 just 
tried out for fun, and bam! I'm in. 
All I know is that we start tomor- 



row — Tomorrow ! ! 

SEPTEMBER 14, MONDAY 1992 
Our rehearsal was quite an experi- 
ence today- Yael, Galeet, Susan, Jeff, 
Julia and I walked into a very hu- 
mid room filled with mostly 
Howard student-dancers and a 
couple of dancers from the DC 
community. They had already 
started warm-ups and we got some 
deathly-cool looks when we 
stepped in the room. I hope this 
racial tension that I'm feeling is 
simply a case of "first day" syn- 
drome. 5:15 to 8:30pm. Three hours 
of intensive technique training. My 
thighs and calves are so sore! 

con t anted on page 66 



64 The Talon 



"It was incredible working 
with the Howard students..." 

AU graduate Susan Stine 

and Howard sophomore 

Reginald Hanna take a moment 

to ponder. 



r ^V 




"... My ankles 
are so sore, 
and my knees 

KILL!" 

The forced arch 
position was a 
technique that 
Primus demanded 
her dancers master. 



"Because 

Sheron has 

faith in me, i 

CAN 

HAVE FAITH 

IN MYSELF..." 

Dance coach 

Sheron Trotman 

gives advices to 

her 

dancers. 




*~v. 




""IT'S FASCINATING 
TO HEAR HER STORIES 
AND TO WATCH HER 
HANDS. .AS IF THEY 
WERE SPEAKING FOR 
HER." Dr. Primus 
discusses the 
choreography as 
Sheron, dancers, 
and Howard 
professor Sherrill 
Miller listen. 



Arts 65 



SEPTMEBER 20, SATURDAY 1992 
So far Jeff and Galeet decided to 
drop, because for them it's just too 
much work- with Jeff's thesis and 
Galeet's ankles- actually all of us are 
hurtin'! My ankles and knees are 
killing. Thank God it's Saturday- 1 
can rest , finally. I'm not sure if I can 
make it through this- 1 mean it is just 
so rigorous, and I'm NOT a trained 
dancer like all the others. I feel like I 
can't do anything as well as they 
can. AUUGGGGH! If Yael quits, I 
don't think I can stay with this 
either. 

SEPTEMBER 30, TUESDAY 1992 
Okay, Yael didn't quit and so, I 
think I can do it ,too. Plus, Susan 
and Julia and all of us are sort of 
bonding now- we're getting closer. I 
guess we can all sit around and bitch 
about how difficult everything is. 



today. She only drops in on occasion 
to teach us new dance sequences; 
Sheron's the one who conducts the 
classes every day. She choreographs 
by explaining the story behind the 
movement. For Cacoa, she told us 
about the workers in the fields of the 
Caribbean plantation owners, and 
how they sang and danced around 
the cacoa beans in order to make 
their work fun. It's fascinating to 
hear her stories and to watch her 
hands move as she speaks as if they 
were speaking for her. The dance 
makes so much more sense with the 
story! Pearl even showed us a pic- 
ture of her and Louis Armstrong 
together! 

NOVEMBER 10, MONDAY 1992 
We've been working on alot of the 
choreography. I can't believe 
showtime is just a month away!- 





Sheron (our dance coach) is great- 
she's really understanding and she 
has helped me so much with my 
turn out and positions. I told her 
about my fears (about not being as 
well-trained as everyone else), and 
she believes that I can do it. Because 
she has faith in me, I can have faith 
in myself. Besides, Yael has been 
supporting me a lot, too. She's tough 
on me, but that just makes me work 
harder. She so great and she knows 
what she's talking about. 

OCTOBER 21, TUESDAY 1992 
Pearl Primus came to rehearsals 



And I don't think were close to 
being ready. I still can't get those 
barrel turns. I get cramps in my 
stomach every time Sheron tells us 
to line up to do them. My ankles are 
a little better, but my knees kill and 
I'm too tired to do my homework 
and to even eat sometimes. I don't 
think I've had a full meal in two 
weeks. We are all getting stressed 
out, not just us but the Howard 
students, too. They're soooo cool- 
I've gotten to know them well these 
past couple of months and I am 
beginning to make a special kind of 
kinship with them- especially Kara, 



Hope and Maji. Hope is like the 
strongest dancer I've ever seen- she I 
and Yael are almost twins. And Kara 
is so beautiful; and she's wonderful 
to watch. They're all so talented. I'm 
glad I decided to stick with this. 

NOVEMBER 22, SUNDAY 1992 
I just got back from Thanksgiving 
break with my family, and we've 
started to have weekend rehearsals 
now since we perform in two weeks! 1 
Some rifts are really cracking here 
with all the problems with the 
organization of this whole project- 
some of the people in charge are 
having problems finding funds and 
rehearsal time for everyone. Plus 
Pearl had been taken ill and hasn't 
been able to work with us as much, 
at least for a couple of weeks. We 
dancers are worried that we don't 
even know all the choreography yet- 
there are two whole dances that we 
haven't even learned yet. Pearl 
works with the children, and sepa- 
rate dance sequences, one at a time 
while the others work on the chore- 
ography together while they wait. 
It's beginning to feel really hectic 
around here- and a lot of us are 
getting tired of dealing with the shit. 



66 The Talon 




\nd Juila had to leave us because 
ler schedule at work wasn't allow- 
ng her the time Pearl wanted from 
a ier. It's crazy! And I'm tired. 

DECEMBER 4, FRIDAY 1992 
'Veil, we made it through tech week 
md we had our first performance in 
he Cramton Auditorium last night 
tt Howard. Considering that this 
vas the first time we ran through 
he whole show all the way through 
tnd we learned the choreography 
or the closing number," Dance To 
>aves Lives," an hour before the 
ihow started (huh, we were really 
lancing for our lives that night), I 
hink we pulled through quite 
emarkably. Everyone's frustrated 
hat everything was so unorganized 
: or our first performance. The critic 
Alan Kriegsman) from the Post was 
/ery kind. The one thing I won't 
orget is when we the featured 
lancers, Kim Bears and Linda 
spriggs, came up to us separately to 
*ive us a little pep talk after Pearl 
:hrew her arms up in frustration and 
walked out of tech rehearsal. They 
:old us to "believe in what we were 
iancing" and most importantly "to 
relieve in ourselves." Well, we got 
:hrough the first performance, 



because we all looked out for each 
other. Let's hope Kennedy Center 
goes better. 

DECEMBER 13, SUNDAY 1992 
It's all over. It's hard to believe we 
actually did it! It was tough but we 
wowed the audience at the Kennedy 
Center last night. Most things went 
relatively smooth. It was quite an 
experience being a performer in the 
Terrace Theater at the The Kennedy 
Center. It's like a dream come true: 
being able to take the stage entrance 
and ride the back elevator to the 
dressing rooms- our own well-lit 
dressing rooms! Some of us even 
did our own roaming around and 
somehow found our way under- 
neath the Opera House, and we saw 
the crates that carried the shoes for 
the Joffrey Ballet dancers. It was 
definitely an adventure. But we did 
it! And I am really gonna miss every 
one. This was definitely an experi- 
ence of a lifetime. Sure there were 
many obstacles and a lot of times I 
even regretted doing it- but I can 
never regret it now. The friends I've 
made and the things I've learned are 
invaluable. It was incredible work- 
ing with the Howard students, and 
we would have never had an oppor- 
continued on yage 68 



(left corner) Conga master, 
Kalib, plays for dancers as 
they warm-up for the 
performance. 



(below) One of the rare occasions 
where there is free time to catch a 
wink of rest during the rigorous 
rehearsal schedule. 



y 




Arts 67 



tunity to work with one another 
without this project. It's a shame 
that with all the colleges in D.C., we 
hardly ever get a chance to interact 
with one another. I remember ex- 
claiming to Pearl after Curtain Call: 
"Pearl, you're a true survivor!" and 
she said to me back, "We are ALL 
survivors;-" then she paused and 
said with a smile, "but you're right, I 
am the best survivor of them all." 
And at 73, she was right, as usual. • 



ft 



...WE are 



ALL survivors... 



if 



"It was quite an experience being a 
performer in the Terrace Theater at 
The Kennedy Center- it was like a 
dream come true I " 



^ 



*S& 




(left) The marquee that 
hung in the Hall of 
States. (Bottom)The 
dancers get ready in the 
well-lit dressing rooms. 






(top) The dancers had to use the 

stage entrance to the Terrace 

Theate. 

(right) A view of the Terrace 

stage from 

the wings. 

(photos by A.G. Cantor) 




68 The Talon 



a Passage : 



For the 
Taste of 

"HON!" 

Charles "Honi" Coles 
(1911-1992) 

Before there was Hines; before there 
was Savion; and even before there 
was Sammy, there was Charles 
Coles: most just called him "Honi." 
One of the greatest hoofers that ever 
lived, Coles was known for being a 
jack of all trades. He could not only 
hoof, but he did softshoe and flash 
styles of tap dance as well. Coles 
was also a singer, songwriter, musi- 
cian and choreographer. Described 
by TAP Project of DC Director Carol 
Vaughn, Coles was "one smooth 
dude." "He was tall, handsome and 
should have been more famous than 
he was," says Vaughn. In his early 
years, Coles partnered up with 
Cholley Atkins, and created the 
most well-known tap duo of their 
time. They were known as the 
"Class Act" because they dressed up 
in top hat and tails, in contrast to 
the rough-cut image of the other 
hoofers. Coles and Atkins elegant 
and debonaire style gave tap dance 
a new image. Many believed that if 
Coles had not been black, he would 
have beat Fred Astaire to his fame. 
In 1983, Coles won a Tony Award 
for his showstopping act in the 
'Broadway show "My One and 
Only." He has performed in several 
i other Broadway shows, like "Hello, 
Dolly" and "Gentlemen Prefer 
Blondes," and danced with the 
national touring company of Bub- 
bling Brown Sugar . Coles also graced 
the screen as well as the stage. He 
tapped away with his fellow hoofers 
in the movie, "Tap" and also in the 
hit film, "The Cotton Club." Coles 




" ...He was one 
smooth dude..." 

-Carol Vaughn 



was also seen in the television ver- 
sion of the Broadway show "Tap 
Dance Kid." In 1991, President Bush 
awarded Coles with the prestigious 
National Medal of Arts in recogni- 
tion of his lifetime dedication to his 
craft. 

In late 1992, Charles "Honi" 
Coles died of cancer. Carol Vaughn 
made her way up to St. Peter's 
Lutheran Church in New York 
(which is known as the "jazz 
church") for Coles' funeral. Vaughn 
reports that there was not enough 
room for everyone that came. The 
guest list was like a Who's Who in 
tap, Gregory Hines, Savion Glover, 
and many others. It was a joyous, 
and not a solemn occasion as one 
would expect. Everyone had come 
to pay their respects to a man who 
had given so much of himself to the 
world and to the art of tap. The tap 
group, "Copasetics" (which is a 
tapper's term meaning "better than 
alright") tapped around Coles' 
casket. And many of Coles' peers 



were asked to speak. Among them 
was the young sensation, Savion 
Glover who- when he reached the 
podium- started to sob and claimed, 
"I can't speak- 1 have to dance..." so 
he tapped out his emotions so hard 
that it shook the casket. Milton 
Jackson, who toured with Coles as 
his bass player, conducted a project 
to make a new documentary illus- 
trating his relationship with Coles. 
The documentary is due out in late 
1993. Vaughn could not find enough 
words to describe how great a talent 
Coles was, but she did end our 
interview reminding all that "Honi" 
Coles was "a great spirit that ex- 
tended far beyond his feet." • 




I 



TIME CAPSULE: 

Before there was The Experi- 
mental Theater in New 
Lecture Hall, The Depart- 
ment of the Performing Arts' 
official studio space was 
located in the Clendenen 
Gymnasium(named after 
Mary Graydon's grandfa- 
ther, Patrick Clendenen). 
Clendenen was located in 
what is now the Ilene Zatkin- 
Butler Garden. Plans for a 
800-1000 seat theater have 
been proposed as far back as 



1963. 



prop 



I 



Arts 69 



nior Theses 



N 
C 
E 



"A Concert Of work" by 
Timothy Willmot 
December 1 1 , 1992 

His speciafty is dance in its modern 
form. His targe and strong frame gives 
fiim a quite intimidating presence on 
stage, ne7(t to alt the other petite and 
graceful dancers ,that is. Tim 'Wilmot is 
somewhat a "Stanislavsky s " type of 
dancer- every movement he executes 
must have meaning and a reason for 
being there. The abstract and sometimes 
compelling pieces he choreographs 
always posses a certain type of depth. 
In this special one-man concert, Tim 
shared with his audience an interpreta- 
tion of his fears and philosophy on life, 
and also a personal tribute to someone 
he truly respected, choreographer (Dan 
Albert who died too young. Tim is a 
graduate fellow in Arts Management, 
and aside from dance, his talents also 
lie backstage within the realm of light 
design. In his pieces, Tim can be ex- 
pected to do the 119{e?(pected: whether 




it be hanging from the ceiling bij an iron 
line, slamming himself over and over 
again onto the floor, or dancing- with 
all his manliness- in a skirt. Tor the 
night of 'December 11th Tim toof^center 
stage and welcomed 'viewers into the 
realm of Timothy 'Wilmot. 



70 The Talon 







ON THEIR WAY 






ITar - ^H 






L ^H 


1 flp 




.aiH 


^^r , ■ ^ ^^m 




MF 


^r 1 

[ ( 


*1 


H| 











"illuminescence" by 

johanna townsend 

Gerry 

December 12, 1992 

This night, the moon shone 
bright [if on one of !AU 's most 
talented students. Johanna 
Qerru shared zuith the audience, 
her memoirs and special thoughts 
,iuhich zvere neatly packaged in 
her one - hour show. She opened 
the show zvith the Tinnochio 
song, "I Qot 9{g Strings " and set 
the scene packing up affof "her 
memories" and sweeping the 
dust away as she prepared to 
leave to conquer the world. 
azvaiting her. Johanna is a 
woman who can do it all: she 
sings , she dances, and she acts 
(her last theatrical masterpiece 
was A Lie Of 'The 'Mind as 
'Beth). She enlightened the 
audience zvith her philosophy 
about dance and about her 



dream to dance in the 
moonlight, and urges us to 
find the time to dance by 
candlelight at least once. 
Rs the title hints- 
Illumines cence: spiritual 
and personal enlighten- 
ment- Johanna brought 
that special light into 
everyone 's lives that night, 
and she zvill continue to 
burn bright that special 
"star" light she radiates. 



Arts 71 



more ...THESIS 



T 
H 
E 

A 
T 

R 





"...They 
packed the 
house to 
overflow- 
ing..." 



ALL TOGETHER NOW... (above) "Size 
Matters" was an ensemble effort, with cast 
and director, (below) The a capella group 
consisting of (L to R) Adam Reynolds, anita 
Willis, Katie Bannar and Chris Dilly pro- 
vides overture music. 



" Size Matters" Susan L. 
Snyder 

Can you imagine being inspired by a 
bathroom stall wall? Well, that 's 
exactly how Susan Snyder began 
writing her original script, "Size Mat- 
ters. "Susan was intrigued with the 
messages scribbfed desparatetif on the 
bathroom ivaffs, and was even more 
fascinated zvith the conversations that 
seemed to hum from these scribbfes. 
Some mail imagine these "scribbfes " to 
be obscene phrases orfrivifous chatter, 
but on the contrary, terribfy serious 
subjects such as eating disorders, rape, 
and insecurity were being communi- 
cated on these waffs. These important 
and human pleas for help sent out 
messages that Susan wanted to commu- 
nicate to others. "Size Matters " is 
Susan s own creation and is her directo- 
rial debut. She auditioned, and selected 
a cast of very talented iAU students. 
There are no "stars " in Susan 's one-act; 
she believes in the ensemble and team- 
zvortc^of the theater and instilled the 
same motivation to her cast through 
special zuorkshop rehersals, which she 
created herself . The hard-worf^and 
team-zvork^shozved , as the cast was 
tight and very real, and mesmerized the 
audience with a venj poiuerful perfor- 
mance. 

"The Private Eye" 
directed by Teresa 
mahan 

Senior Tess Mahan chose an unknozon 
one-act written By Peter Shaffer to try 
her hand at directing for her capstone 
project. Together u'ith Susan Snyder, 
they produced a night of one-acts in the 



72 The Talon 



Cassetl Acting Studio and the proceeds 
went to the 'DC 'Rape Crisis Center and 
the 'Whitman -'Walker Center. Their 
second night of performance packed the 
house to overf Uniting, and in that night 
afone they raised over $300. 'The 
'Private 'Eye " came in the second half of 
the evening, and the audience sat 
intrigued as the story unfolded, fresh- 
man Ale^'Honzen p fayed a very mag- 
nificent and solid 'British accountant 
who must deal utith the shoestring, 
"rough-around the edges "private eye 
(played By junior 'Dave Buckman- utith 
great comedic timing) zohich he has 
hired to spy on his ivife (played By 
junior Danielle Schultz). The audience, 
consisting of parents and students 
alike, recieved the play with cheers. 
J(udos to Tess Mahanfor a successful 
night. 

"Signatures"- A Concert 
of Choreographic Works 
featuring jeff m. 
Rebudal and Amy Malkin 

FlLDERMAN 

The dance department of American 
University often goes unnoticed by 
students on -campus, audit 's a shame 
Because they are a treasure of talent 
dancing their hearts out and their 
dedication to their craft is truly evident 
in their worf^ "Signatures" is a "fare- 
well" show, if you will, featuring tiuo 
of All 's graduate students: leff 
%eBudal and Amy 'Malkin 'Jilderman- 
who will Be leaving the graduate 
program this spring. 'Jor these first two 
nights in early April, leff and Amy 
played host and hostess to a night of 
dance, expressing a variety of forms: 
modern, jazz, filipino, and even a 
twisted form of Scottish. Most of the 
pieces were choroegraphed By the 
genius of "geminis "-'leff and Amy. Only 
two pieces: "Antigamente " and "Sarah 
1Njpd...(9(gcturnal Intermission) ", zvere 



choreographed By guest artists Ian grandmother whose 79th Birthday 

'Erkert and Doug Elkins [respectively). zvould have Been on the concert date. 
'With 'leff 's jazzy and humorous, light 'Keep an eye out for leff LReBudal and 
style and Amy 's flouting and graceful, Amy Malkin 'Jilderman in the future, 
classical movements the concert was a as they move on to express themselves 
very zvell-Balanced and exciting produc- to the rest of the world. 9 
Hon. Since the show was an accumula- 
tion of most of the pieces the 
two have performed in their 
two years at All, it was a 
nice, sentimental way of 
leaving their impressions and 
mark^on the All stage. The 
show was dedicated to the 
loving memory of Amy 's 



We've got 

an "EYE" 
ON... 

The cast and 

director, Tess 

Mahan(center of 

top photo), of 

"The Private 

Eye." (right) 

Poster ,designed 

by Jeff Rebudal- 

who is also the 

featured dancer, 

along with Amy 

Filderman, in 

"Signatures." 




SIGN/^ 







Arts 73 






HE 




BY 

John Gay 



directed by Christian 
Mendenhall 



October 7-10 
October 14-18 

Experimental Theater 



All in a days 

WORK: MacHeath at his 
most playful with " the 
Women." (Photo by Ken 
Cobb) 




74 The Talon 




Arts 75 



his DPA production had it all, nothing 
short of laughs, nothing short of slapstick, and not 
shy of women busting out of their costumes. John 
Gay's Tlie Beggar's Opera is a commentary piece 
on the 16th century Britania society. Gay plays on 
the vices of both lower and upper classes, and the 
people caught in between. Director Christain 
Mendenhall commented in his note to the audience 
that the "essence of Comedy is to show that 'all is 
human','' as mentioned in the prologue of the play 
Complete with a Player and the Beggar as the "di- 
rector" and "playwright," the show began with all 
the actors preparing to present the story of the play, 
then they tranform into the characters they are 
supposed to play So the audience is immediately 
sucked into the life of the play and is transported 
back in time. And despite the authentic period 
costumes and haughty accents, the main message 
of the play is universal even in today's terms, espe- 
cially the virtues of men and women in love, but 
not in love; it showed that men and women alike 
can be just as devious as the other- all take part in 
the foolish game. There were really no villians in 
the play because everyone had their own darkside, 
making the personalities equal in virtue. Deceit 
seemed to be a rule of thumb and widely accepted. 
All in all: "To err is human" and we are all human, 
nothing should be taken seriously. But this explana- 
tion is too dry and anal, and it doesn't do this AU 
production justice- so forget what the real message 
is and take the play as it was supposed to be taken: 
lots of fun, lots of laughs, lots of big-breasted 
women and beer-guzzlin' rogues. 
As an audience member, I was impressed with 
undertaking of such a difficult play, but nothing's 
impossible for the DPA, especially Mr. Mendenhall- 
notorious for his shrewdness in the art. The cos- 
tumes which were rented were gorgeous under 
Broadway's Howard Kurtz' expertise costuming. 
Rehersals included intense studies of the 16th cen- 
tury period, the language and the social ettiqutte of 
the time. A special guest performer and expert on 
Catillion dance and movement assisted in the ac- 
tors' tranformation into gentile and subtly 




The bawdiest of the 

BARD:The "well-endowed" and trite 
Lucy Lockit (Colleen Rvan) contem- 
plates whether to keep MacHeath 
behind bars or to set him free (top). The 
scheming duo of Mr. and Mrs. 
Peachum, played by Chris Dillev 
(bottom) and MicheleCerto scorn their 
naive daughter Polly (Anita Willis). 
(Photos by Ken Cobb) 



76 The Talon 




The Guys and the Girl: 

The Captain's Crew at their usual 
watering hole (left). (top)The 
devious Jenny Divers (Suzanne 
Abbott) one of MacHeath's many 
women. 




permiscuous citizens of the 16th century. The 
hard work definitely showed through, a good 
review from the Washington Post even took 
note. Harpsicord strings underscored the show 
and the many short arias and heart-felt ballads. 
The actors kept up the energy with impressive 
vigor for an over two hour show. The virtually 
young cast, boldly mixed of veteran AU actors 
and new faces alike- gave a fresh and exciting 
air to the stage. Whilethe exaggerrated expres- 



sions of The Peachums (played by Chris Dilley 
and Michelle Certo) and Lucy Lockit (played by 
freshman Colleen Ryan) stole scenes, audience 
members were wooed by the charms of the 
swarthy highwayman MacHeath (played by 
senior Sean Grady) and welcomed the slapstick 
action of the gang members and the bawdyness 
of the giggling "ladies" of the town. John Gay's 
The Beggar's Opera was quite an opener for the 
DPA's 92-93 season. • .„ . . ., _ _ , 

written by April G. Cantor 

Arts 77 



Ones 
to — 



Qraduates andUndtrgrads you won 't 



want to truss... 



Watch 




Barry H. Blumenfeld 

dancer/actor and -psychology major 

'This 'Miami native enteral college as a drummer. 'Hh freshman year he 
signed up for a tap class zvith Carol 'I hughn, and from then on the rest 
has Been history. 'He has worked with such greats as Qregon]'Hines, 
Lai 'aughn 'Rgbinson, ami die tapping team of Hot 'Toot. 'Amy aspires 
to get his M3L in 'Dance 'Movement .Therapy, and maybe, even ashow 
m'Brvadzuay. 

"That s ail I want to do- tap and make people laugh. I 
mean, not at the same time; well, yeah, at the same time- 
but they shouldn 't be laughin ' at my tappin ', unless I m 
saying something funny with my feet. That 's all I want to 
do with my life: tap and comedy- on 'Broadu'ay, in films, 
on the streets... everywhere!" 



\ 




Susan L. Snyder 

playu'right 



She appeived asJlnna in :1'U s 
praiuctumof'Ihc'DianftrfAme 

Riv- y V.' 1 HL 'Jrailchersophoinoreiiear,iietthis 

*fe;'-, '■; BRi'Uwl'i.^^ Literature major lias found anotlier 

^^^mimm »J|MJ *2i&\ h/pe of spotlight inula tliervleas 
^^^ ^^^^wC Vt ~&H plcywright. 'Manymight liazvcaughl 
^^Hjfc J ^^^^^B Susan in the bathroom stalls searching 

fornMerialtouseiriheroiie-act,Size 

'Matters, which was zued receizvd by professors and students alike. TreUysoon actors -will be jumping 
at the opportunity to do a "Smuierplay. " 

"'Play-writing is: starting with an idea and putting it in motion. 'Playu'rights 
usually write by listening to what they need to say to themselves I think\up of so 
many things all at once- seriously! 'Everything just pops into my head at the same 
time. I really want to be a part of an ensemble theater group. I want to work-in 
the arts for social causes- it s one sure way to reach people. I want to be able to 
convince all those people out there who think^they OV^C'Tdo it, that they O^d 
'Everyone can DO IT. " _ 

J Mark Simpson 

lighting designer 

'He has his sights set on 
'Yale for lighting design. 
'Eventhough one may never 
see his face on stage, many 
audiences definitely see his 
work\. In fact, without 
Mark, audiences zvouldn 't 
even be able to see the 
performers. Mark\is The 
lighting master at AU, and 
soon he ll be lighting stages 
alt over the theater world. 




Jeff M. Rebudal 

(no picture available) dana ' r 

'This bundle of energy from 'Jyalihi, '.Hawaii, graced the 

stage of M'U with his jazzy, light-hearted moves. 'This 

talented 'Tilipino nozvgets ready to move on to bigger 

stages and brighter lights in 'Jieiv c york\ 

"It was a fluke! Dance for me started out as a hobby. 1 

was supposed to be a newscaster. I was groomed since 

high school to do just that. Whoops! Wrong move. I 

guess I had something else in me. "'Boto says bye-bye; 

We '((see him in C\£) r . 



Dave Warren 

actor (no picture ai'aitable) 

fresh from the Sarah Lawrence program in 
London, Dave burned upthe stage with his 
portrayal of "lake" in A Lie Of A Mind. 
Dave's fanthom-decp insight into his charac- 
ters, is what sets him above the rest. 'His 
original script, 'The Clown, was presented this 
spring. Watch out De'liiro, here comes an 
artist with a true soul for his art. 



78 The Talon 




Stringing 

Them 

Along 

AU Orchestra 
hums like a 
winner 



I he Orchestra of American University presented 
their best this year, under the direction of conductor 
Piotr Gajewski. In the fall, the orchestra gave a concert 
in November and featured the works of the Franck 
Symphony in D minor. And for the holiday festivities, 
they assisted the AU Singers/Chorale in the Messiah 
Sing-Along celebration at the Kay Spiritual Life Center. 
Some members of the orchestra took a break from the 
lassies and found their seats in the theater and accom- 
panied the actors in such musicals like the Beggar's 
Opera (in the fall) and the Mikado (in the spring). The 
live sounds of the brass and stringed instruments really 
added a special magic to the productions. Gajewski lead 
his musicians in their rendition of Gershwin's "Rhap- 
sody in Blue" and Dvorak's "New World Symphony" 
for the orchestral concert in the spring, for a very appre- 
ciative audience in Kay Center. The approximately 40- 
piece orchestra is mostly made up of students, with an 
Dccasional community musician. They spend every 



Tuesday, from eight to ten in the evening, rehearsing in 
the halls of the Kreeger building, homebase for the 
Performing Arts Department. Sophomore Jennifer 
Seltenrich has been playing the flute for ten years and 
has been a member of the orchestra since her freshman 
year. Her love for music motivates the dedication that is 
needed to be a part of the orchestra. "It is a lot of work, 
but there is a lot of enjoyment, too," Jennifer says. Being 
under the direction of Gajewski, she says, is "fun and 
interesting." Gajewski is a professional conductor who 
does a sufficient amount of work in the city, so working 
under his experience is beneficial to many of the student 
musicians. Live music is a treat these days, since tapes 
and CD's have taken over the music world. And having 
an orchestra located on campus, with very talented 
musicians, is definitely a treat. # 

written by April G. Cantor 




TIME CAPSULE: 

In 1970, The American University and DumbartonUnited 
Methodist Church, Georgetown collaborated to produce the 
"Open Stage" Theater. This project allowed students to indulge 
in theatrical experimentation, and direct original scripts that 
expressed new theatrical forms. Nicholas Howey, from the 
AU drama department, acted as co-executive director. The 
performances were held at the church, and audiences could 
discuss the play with its director and meet the actors in a 
make-shift coffee-house named "Aftermath" which was located 
in the basement of the church. 



V 



Dance a 

Mile in 

Their Shoes 

AU DANCERS ARE STILL 
DANCING !! 



E venthough the poster fea- 
tured a quartet of gay-looking cows, 
The Spring Dance Concert 1993 
definitely had no cows in their show 
this time around (gee, I hope the 
audiences weren't dissappointed). 
The Spring Concert brought on a 
showcase of dance forms and exhib- 
ited the true talent that lies within 
AU's dance department. This was an 
especially exciting performance, 
because dance professor Suzanne 
Carbonneau made her debut on the 
Experimental Stage and graced the 
student audiences with her perfor- 
mance as a featured dancer in Yael 
Levy's "Dyslexic Heart". 

The night "tapped" off with 
the sultry moves of "Crossroads" 
choreographed by senior Barry 
Blumenfeld. Together with Galeet 
BenZion and April Cantor, 
Blumenfeld created a tapping trio 
with an edge of modern movement 
to the blue sounds of Eric Clapton's 
Rush track. The integration of mod- 
ern and tap was a concept 
Blumenfeld had tried with his 
Spring '92 piece, "Moon", which 
was well-received. An audience 
member remarked about the mixing 
:)f tap and modern forms, "What I 

80 The Talon 




saw was different from anything 
else I have ever seen; and I liked 
what I saw." Maryse Jacobs' 
"Sakuura" followed next, with now 
a familiar face- Galeet BenZion, Tina 
Matsuoka, and Ana Restropo. The 
choreographer's note told us that 
"this piece expresses the conflict 
between vulnerability and a goal 
oriented society." The piece began in 
silence and with the inflation of a 
rock being thrown upon a circle 
shield the intervals of music began. 
The piece had a very earthy feel to it, 
with a set consisting of a pile of 
stones and a circle shield propped 
up by a tripod of wooden branches. 
The movements were striking and 
took on many interesting forms. 
Each interval of the modern move- 
ments built up and up to higher 
levels, it reached a climax and then 
fell down in exhaustion. Godfrey 
Silas leap onto stage after with his 
statonary balletic piece, "La Linea 
Lirica". Silas' flowing and fluttering 
arms extended and unfolded and 
swept the air in time to Beethoven. 
He suceeded in showing the many 
classic lines dancers must have in 
their performance. 

Next up was Amy Malkin 



"...0-(oiv can we Build a 
better future if ive 
deny the past?" 

AU dancers are 
certainly not deny- 
ing their past, 
backed with classic 
training and a soul 
for dance- in fact 
they explode into the 
present and full- 
steam ahead for the 
future with a full 
range of talents. 

by April G. Cantor 



Filderman's undulating and flowing 
piece, "Cleave and Cleave". The 
dancers (Kristin Barber, Galeet 
BenZion, Michelle Cohen, 
Veronique Dan Tran, and Alesha 
Pulsinelle) dressed in the silky 
autumn tones of burgundy, red and 
brown gave the impression of blow- 
ing leaves, gracefully weaving into 
and out from each other, especially 
under the tree pattern of the lights. 
From the autumn leaves to the 
bamboo of the Philippines, we're 
taken into "Kapuluan." Choreogra- 
pher Jeff Rebudal took images and 
movements from traditional Filipino 
folk dances and pieced them to- 
gether into modern form. The fast, 
acrobatic forms were exciting to 
watch, and they were cleverly juxta- 
posed to the Muslim undulations 
and revolving wrists in the back- 
ground. Dancers Lori Clark, Amy 
Nguyen and Yael Levy along with 
Jeff Rebudal were just as exotic to 
watch as the piece itself. 

After intermission, the stage 
exploded with Yael Levy's "Dyslexic 
Heart" whose music was composed 
especially for the piece by Eric 
Harnden. Audiences chuckled at the 
parody of the man and his pursuit of 
four women simultaneously. Tim 
Wilmot danced the token male's 
role, while Suzanne Carbonneau, 
Melanie Warmer, Galeet BenZion 
and April Cantor played the women 
who in the end get him back for his 
infidelity. The choreography of Levy 
(who comes straight from Tel Aviv 
as a graduate) consists of simple, 
concrete movements that naturally 
gain momentum as you execute 
them. Her movements take every- 
day gestures and transforms them 
into interesting modern form. The 
next piece was preluded by a note 
asking: "How can we build a better 
future if we deny the past?" Jacques 
Burgering choreographed this com- 
pelling solo piece to the Pogues' 
"Rainbow Man" in expression of the 
questions he asks himself about his 
own life. The leaps and rolls were 
highlighted by recitations of little 
phrases which his father used to say 



MOVING 
ALONG: 

(right) Galeet BenZion 
and Tina Matsuoka 
in"Sakura." (below) 
Barry Blumenfeld and 
April Cantor meet at 
the "Crossroads." 
(opposite page) Amy 
Nguyen throws in a 
pinch of Muslim- 
influence into 
"Kapuluan." (photos 
by Matt Lovering) 



to him when he was young. The 
piece exuded the confrontation of 
decisions and having to make them. 

The show was capped off 
with guest artist Randy Warshaw's 
piece, "Company" which was 
preceeded with a three and a half 
minute monologue by Beckett. The 
piece moved from complete silence 
with a single, lonely woman lying 
on her back in darkness, into a duet , 
then came the industrial clinking 
and beating sounds which 
backdropped the rest of the piece. 
The tempo of the piece was very 
sharp and staccato, with lots of 
angular, exploding movements. 
There were some very interesting 
formations and images within the 
piece. The race of the beat lead into 
jumpy sharp moves and then sultry, 
dark gestures and as the music 
climaxed, the movements increased 
in speed as well. The piece closed 
with the lonely woman (from the 
beginning) looking back to a falling, 
sprawled out body suspended in the 
air by the hands of the group. The 
dancers: Susan Stine, Tim Wilmot, 
Jeff Rebudal, Monica Chelsak,Yael 
Levy, Amy Malkin, and Jacques 
Burgering, worked with Randy 
Warshaw for three weeks of inten- 
sive rehearsals as a vehicle for 
Warshaw to workshop his new piece 
for his company. The piece "Com- 
pany" made its debut in New York a 
couple of weeks after it premiered 
on the AU stage with AU dancers. • 





TIME CAPSULE: 

AHHH! The joy of 

inflation. 

Ticket prices for AU 

productions over the 

years: 

1950 $1.00 

1963 $1.50-$2.00 

1970 $3.00 

1993 $5.00 



Arts 81 



.*•** 






■ 



"1 



- 



I 



Come and Get It!... 

All actors take you Home to The Dining Room 






H 
E 

A 
T 
E 



Director, Caleen 
Jennings brings 
the family to- 
gether with a 
show that made 
everyone feel 
good. 




w 



hen you've got your props 
manager away for a funeral and one 
of the actresses in the show missing 
for the same reason, and it's one 
weekend before showtime, you 
wouldn't think that anything else 
could go wrong. But alas, before 
dress rehearsal the stage manager 
tells the cast that their director is 
stranded at home with an abomi- 
nable migrane headache and prob- 
able would not make it for the run. 
Yet, despite all these unfortunate 
obstacles, the cast of The Dining 
Room stuck together and went on 
with the show just like a family 
would do. Which is what the cast 
and crew of Dining Room grew to 
be; and it's a special bonding that 
one just can't avoid with a play like 
this and a director like Caleen 
Jennings. 

Jennings, miraculously recov- 



ered from her migrane, and actually 
made it in time for the run that 
night. After the show for notes, 
Jennings told her cast that their luck 
had definitely taken a 180-degree 
turn for the better, because of some- 
thing special that happened before 
she got to the theater that night. Her 
son had shown her a gold necklace 
with a heart pendant, and she in- 
quired as to where he had gotten it. 
He explained to her that this was the 
same necklace that she scolded him 
at for not taking it to a lost and 
found seven months ago. Jennings 
all of a sudden discovered that the 
pendant was a locket and could be 
opened, and when she pried the 
heart open (and as she told her 
story, she revealed to her cast that 
she was wearing it around her neck 
and had begun to open it for them) 
inside was a tiny musicbox that 
played the tune "Aura Lee",which 



82 The Talon 



"It was the Best show I thinfc^&U s ever done so 
far... It really made me laugh.' ' -chrisSivope, junior 




A PORTRAIT FAMILY LIFE: 

opposite, Chuck Dills greets good morning 

to Lizzie-Boo (Abby Karp). top, Winkie 

(April Cantor) turns five, as Mommy (Karen 

Graci) and friends- Javier Riviera and Dan 

Schacner (below) help celebrate, far right , 

Architect, Tony SanFilippo, looks back on 

"those terrible family dinners." 



iounds a lot like "Love Me Tender"- 
vhich is the song that is sung in the 
:>lay! It was an appropriate coinci- 
dence since after seven months in 
tiding this special pendant had 
hown up just in time for the show, 
ind the show's last night was on 
/alentine's Day. From that moment 
)n, the cast knew that everything 
vas going to go well, and Jennings 
pledged to wear the pendant every- 
day of the run. 

Everything did go well- each 
performance was welcomed with 
/ery appreciative audiences, who 



found that they could relate to many 
of the situations in the play. This is 
the wonderful quality of A.R. 
Gurney's play, which this Buffalo- 
native wrote in perspective of the 
experiences he had with his own 
family in their dining room. On the 
whole , this play is a serio-comedy- 
many scenes are obviously funny 
but in most of the more serious 
scenes the humor lies within the 
depths of the subtext. Many people 
came out of the show feeling cozy 
and warm inside. One viewer even 
went to the card store and bought 



his father a card the day after watch- 
ing the show. The play touched 
many people in a way that made 
them laugh and to look at life in a 
more positive way. Many of the cast 
members would agree. 
There were no divas, no stars; many 
of the faces were new and fresh and 
shed a different light on the Experi- 
mental Theater stage. Jennings 
believes in the ensemble of theater, 
and through special workshops wit! 
mime specialist Dodi De Santo, and 
with improvisations in rehearsals 
she instilled the actors with the same 

continued on page S4 

Arts 83 




ANYTHING'S POSSIBLE AT THE 

DINNER TABLE: 

Watch out Grandpa! (played by Chuck 

Dills) Here comesanother one asking for 

money (Tony SanFilippo and Leisl 

Frischmann). Left ,"I don't want to do 

domestic service no more!" (Rebecca 

Hernandez and Dave Umlas). 

All photos by Matt Lovering. 




"There were 

no divas, no 

stars; many 

of the faces 

were new and 

fresh and 

shed a 

differrent 

light..." 



beliefs in working as an ensemble. 
It was a great experience for 
both director, cast, crew, and audi- 
ence. It was hard to break up the 
ensemble after the show ended, for 
the cast threw parties well after the 
run. The best news was that the 
adjudicator who attended closing 
night nominated freshman Rebecca 
Hernandez for the Irene Ryan schol- 
arship ,for her character work in the 
show. In addition, two scenes were 
also chosen to go the ACTF as final- 
ists for the region. The two scenes 
were the "Typewriter" scenes that 
ran back-to-back. The are the same 
scene but the first time the audience 
sees it its in English, and the second 
time it is seen the scene is done 
entirely in Spanish (translated by 



freshman Javier Rivera). This was a 
specific choice by Jennings to illus- 
trate the universality of the message 
in the play, and how the same situa- 
tions can happen in different cul- 
tures and be perceived and handled 
in different ways. Universality is 
definitely a theme that Jennings is 
well-known for her in her produc- 
tions. Just one look at her cast- an 
Indian, a Filipino, three Hispanics, 
an African- American and a variety 
of white Americans, it just breathes 
universality. # 

written by April G. Cantor 



The Talon 



CURTAIN CALL 




As the curtain falls on our performances: 

All the lines said, all actions made, the play comes to an end and it is time for 
Curtain Call. The lights are up on full and flood the stage on faces that are now 
familiar to the audience. For the players it is time to come together, wish each 
other a job well done, and soak in the applause of recognition. For many of the 
graduating seniors, the end of the semester- walking across that stage in a cos- 
tume robe- is their Curtain Call. Yet, the play of life does not end there. In fact, a 
new stage is set; new costumes to wear; more lines to learn- the lights shine on 
a new adventure. For all those whose talents must leave our stage at AU and 
move on to bigger audiences, WE WISH YOU THE BEST OF LUCK... 

remember to take your Bozos 

at 

curtain caff 

and 
<D<%EJWt 

of 
breaking tigs' I' 

-April G. Cantor 



Arts 85 



ICAN UNIVERSITY 



"""^■■Hi ■■■■ 



1893 - 1993 




*M 




F[p* 



fir 





d 



Mr. Clinton 

Goes to 

Washington 



1992 was a long and 
painful year for Bill 
Clinton. At the onset, there 
was a man who lived a 
busy, yet peaceful life as 
governor for his home 
state of Arkansas. For the 
most part, he was un- 
known to the rest of the 
country and could travel 
virtually unrecognized. 
That all changed in Janu- 
ary, when Clinton's name 
made it to the list of 
Democratic nominees. 
Soon after, his life began to 
unfold before the Ameri- 
can public as the media 
pressed hard to find the 
bad in him. They scruti- 
nized every bit of informa- 
tion they could scrape up 
about him and exploited 
his personal life. We heard 
endless counts of adultery, 
accusations for not serving 
in Vietnam and even 
stories of his childhood 
with an alcoholic and 
abusive stepfather. Clinton 
never gave up, though, 
because now he was 
fighting for his country. 

continued on p. 93 











President Clinton's open house after 
the inauguration was not a new idea. 
In 1902, President Theodore 
Roosevelt held a similar reception on 
New Year's Day. Hundreds of people 
gathered at the white house with the 
hope of getting inside to the recep- 
TION. 



Metro 91 




'This is our time. Let us jf 

embrace it. There is nothing 

wrong with America that 

cannot be cured by what is 

right with America/' 

-President Clinton, \ 

January 20, 1993 



94 f-."T. 




92 The Talon 





1993 came and Clinton 
defeated incumbent Presi- 
dent Bush and the tales of 
the media in one fell 
swoop. On January 20th, he 
became the 42nd President 
of the United States. Some 
argue his charm won over 
the nation. Others say there 
really was no choice be- 
cause a change was a great 
necessity. Both are prob- 
ably true, but what's more 
is Clinton simply under- 
stands Americans' needs 
and wants. He is a man of 
compassion and wants to 
take action to remedy their 
problems, rather than 
simply propose action. He 
is young, vibrant and as a 
baby boomer, is part of the 
largest generation of all 
time. He's the guy next 
door and he can get results. 



Metro 93 




Landmarks 

of HISTORY 

A look at some of the spots that make 
Washington memorable 






J 1_ /" 



Throughout the city of 
Washington there are 
many statues and sculp- 
tures dedicated to our 
countries founding fathers, 
heros and great patriots. 
From massive structures 
such as the Washington 
Monument and the Lin- 
coln Memorial to the 
smaller and lesser known 
statesmen who ride eter- 
nally upon horseback on 
the cities roadsides and in 
traffic circles. Each monu- 
ment represents a part of 
our great American heri- 
tage. A heritage, which for 
the last 200 years, Wash- 
ington has been the center 



of for this whole great 
nation. Most people go 
about there daily routines 
in Washington without 
ever noticing these sculp- 
tures. This is unfortunate 
because each of these 
memorials has an interest- 
ing story to tell about an 
American who contributed 
something to the United 
States to make it the great 
nation that it is. 



I- V » 



?1 ■ 

.' Aft 



:m**± 



F 



^^^^^: ^x*m< 



- : v 




94 The Talon 





Opposite Top: One of 
many equestrian 
monuments that popu- 
LATE Washington 
(photo by James Hous- 
ton) 

Opposite Bottom: a 
view of the jefferson 
Memorial while under 
construction (photo 
by James Houston). 

left: as one of the 
most powerful monu- 
MENTS in Washington 
the Korean War Me- 
morial STANDS ADJA- 
CENT to the Viet Nam 
War Memorial (photo 
by James Houston). 

above: an elegant 
view of the captiol 
building from the 
Lincoln Memorial 
(Talon file photo). 






Metro 95 




The A.I.D.S. Quilt 

A somber tribute to those who have suffered 
at the clutches of this terrible disease 




In America hundreds of 
thousands of people 
have died of the Acquired 
Immune Deficiency Syn- 
drome. In memory of the 
men and women who 
have died at the hands of 
this cruel disease, the 
families and friends of 
each victim have sewn a 
patch which in some way 
commemorates their lost 
love one. Each of these 
wonderful patches are a 
part of a greater tapestry 
which is known as the 
AIDS Quilt. This Quilt 
tours the country in an 
attempt to raise conscious- 
ness about AIDS, how it 



effects people and their 
families, and most impor- 
tantly, it is a disease that 
effects us all, not just a few 
select groups. Each year 
the Quilt makes a stop on 
the National Mall in D.C. , 
where it is assembled and 
displayed in hopes that the 
our nations leaders will 
give AIDS more attention 
and funding, and hope 
one day soon a cure will 
be found. Hopefully this 
cure will be found a little 
bit sooner due to the Quilt 
and the efforts of the 
people behind the Quilt. 

-by Ann Ridenour 



Above: Hundreds of 

visitors await the 

opening of the quilt 

(photo by Megan 

Brown) 

Opposite Top: A mo- 
ment OF REFLECTION 

(photo by Matthew 
lovering) 

Opposite Left: A 

look at many letters 

posted for President 

Clinton (photo by 

Matthew Lovering) 

Opposite Right: Just 

one panel of many 

expressing all of the 

pain and sorrow of 

loss (photo by megan 

BROWN). 





r# *" Z? ' "** -^ «w«- «^ «^, "** - ■ 

**^ ^ «■» ** ^* , ' i u^- 



ax: 



N 



Oh 






LxJ 



/^»> ' "A « ) ^ ^.N « \ 1 



on the mali 

In 1901 the Senate's McMillan Commis- 
sion DEVISED A PLAN TO REVISE THE MALL 

TO L'Enfants plan we now see. In 
1851 , L'Enfants plans were trashed in 
favor of making the mall a huge gar- 
DEN. This plan never got further 

THAN THE SMITHSONIAN 'PLEASURE GAR- 
DEN' WHICH IS PRESENT TODAY. 



Metro 97 




The Smithsonian 

Institution 

A look at our national museum 



The Smithsonian 
Institution Building, 
more commonly known as 
the Castle, was designed 
by architect James 
Renwick and constructed 
between 1847 and 1855. 
When is opened, it had a 
public exhibition area, 
offices, laboratories and 
sleeping quarters for the 
scientists. Today, the 
Castle houses the 
Smithsonian Information 
Center, administrative 
offices and the Woodrow 
Wilson International 
Center for Scholars as well 
as the James Smithson 
crypt. 



98 The Talon 





Opposite Top: The 
Smithsonian Institu- 
tion IS SITUATED 
ALONG THE MALL. THE 
LARGEST TOURIST AT- 
TRACTION of Washing- 
ton (PHOTO BY JEAN- 

Christophe Brooke). 

Opposite Bottom: 
The West Wing of the 
National Gallery of 
Art houses some of 
the nations' most 
famous paintings 
including the only 
leonardo da vlnci in 
the u.s. (photo by 
jean-christophe 
Brooke). 

LEFT: The 

Smithsonian Castle 
houses the adminis- 
trative offices of 
the institution 
(photo by jean- 
christophe brooke). 



Metro 99 




Let it not be forgotten 

The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum unveils 
remembering those who suffered inhuman torture 



i 



n the words of 
Harvey M. 
Meverhoff, who became 
Chairman in 1987, "This 
Museum was built for 
Americans who are de- 
cent, and thoughtful, and 
caring, hut who may not 
have confronted their 
knowledge if history's 
most tragic event in a way 
that impacts their every- 
day experience. It is our 
intent that every visitor to 
the Museum will leave not 
just with knowledge, but 
with the determination to 
speak out and act against 
injustice and racism and 
the denial of basic human 
rights, and to make that 
commitment a part of 
their lives." 



100 The Talon 





Photo by jeff Goldberg/Esto. All Rights Reserved 



The newest American federal museum, the United 
States Holocaust Memorial Museum, was publicly 
dedicated on April 22, 1993 at 11:00 A.M. adjacent to the 
lational Mall in Washington, D.C.. Nobel Peace Prize 
Winner Elie Wiesel and Museum Chairman Harvev M. 
Vleyerhoff spoke to the dedication audience, which 
ncluded national and international dignitaries. 

Created as America's only national museum and 
nemorial to the Holocaust, and built with private dona- 
ions, the Museum commemorates all victims of Nazi 
anaticism — the Jews and Gypsies targeted for complete 
innihilation, and the millions of Poles, handicapped, 
ays, Soviet POWs and religious and political disidents 
vho were persecuted and murdered. The Museum 
ncompasses a permanent exhibition providing a com- 
prehensive and chronological historv of the Holocaust; a 
zomputerized Learning Center offering visitors infor- 
mation through a touchscreen database; an educational 



center; a Research Institute; a special children's exhibit; 
two auditoriums and the Hall of Remebrance — the 
national memorial to the victims of the holocaust. 

Under the leadership of founding Chairman Elie 
Wiesel, the Museum was envisioned as a "fluid medium 
in which to apply historical complexities; its presenta- 
tions would not be static but designed to elicit an evolv- 
ing understanding." After many years of planning , the 
Museum has fulfilled that vision. Its evocative, power- 
ful building, designed by James I. Freed of Pei Cobb 
Freed & Partners, challenges the Washington skyline 
with its towers reminiscent of the watchtowers of the 
concentration camps. The three-floor permanent exhibi- 
tion uses artifacts, historical photographs, video, audio 
and text to communicate both the history and lessons of 
the Holocaust in contexts particularly appropriate for an 
American audience. 



Metro 101 



EXPANSIONS OF THE MIND 

The Phillips Collection 



«i©£9Hh 




The Phillips Collection... a 
memorial, a benpficient force in 
the community where I li/e, a 




joy-gjving, life-enhancing 
nfluence assisting people to s6e 
beautifully as true artists see. 




C€f*VPhrilifDS 
' ill 





1 he Phillips Collection, occupies a unique 
position in the United States and the nation's 
capital as the oldest museum of modern art in the 
country, and one of the most beloved museums in 
this city. Noted worldwide for its great paintings 
and comfortable, homesetting, its Sunday After- 
noon Chamber Concerts have been a favorite with 
Washingtonians since 1941 and have provided 
important early concerts for such stellar musical 
talents as Jesseye Norman, Emanuel Ax, and the 
late Glenn Gould. 

In 1921, Duncan Phillips (1886-1966) an heir to 
Jones and Laughlin steel fortune, opened two 
rooms of his family home to the city and the world 
as a memorial to his brother and father. He con- 
ceived of the museum as "a joy giving, life-enhanc- 
ing influence, assisting people to see beautifully as 
true artist's see." The Phillips Collection has re- 
mained throughout it's history an intimate setting 
in which to experience some of world's finest 
paintings. 

Duncan Phillips opened the collection as a 
museum of modern art and its sources, believing 
strongly in the continuum of art. Thus, he col- 
lected such past masters as El Greco because he 
was the "the first impassioned expressionist", 
Chardin because he was "in a sense that all paint- 
ers understand, the first modern painter" and 
Manet. The Phillips Collection is noted for its 
Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings. 
Pierre Auguste Renoir's dazzling icon of Impres- 
sionism, The Luncheon of the Boating Party hangs 
here. 



■ 



The roomful opalescent canvases by turn-of-the 
century French painter Pierre Bonnard, and the 
intimate interiors of Edouard Vuillard, are particu- 
larly well matched to this intimate museum. Cub- 
ist pioneer Georges Braque is represented by thir- 
teen works including the magnificent canvas The 
Round Table , and the Paul Klee room with such 
whimsical canvases as Arab Song and Picture 
Album brings delight to visitors of all ages . 

American artists are equally celebrated in The 
Phillips Collection-such 19th century artists as 
Homer, Eakins, Prendergast, Whistler, and 
Ryderare displayed together and the museum is 
especially strong in the works of modernists, 
O'Keefe, Marin, Dove, and Hartley. Mid century 
artists such as Jacob Lawrence, Mark Rothko, and 
Richard Diebenkorn are also popular with visitors 
to the museum. The abstract color studies of 
Augustus Vincent Tack are said to have inspired 
the artists of the famous Washington Color School. 




The Watkins Gallery at the American 
university is named after claw 
warkins.an artist, former yale class- 
mate and friend of duncan phillips. 
Watkins became Associate Director in 
Charge of Education at the Phillips. 
He gave free painting lessons at the 
Gallery, and the classes held at the 
Phillips grew from a handful of stu- 
dents IN 1929 TO AN ENROLLMENT OF 

about 200 students in 1931. 

Fall 1942. The Phillips Memorial 
Gallery and The American 
Universityjoin forces by establishing 
undergraduate and graduate pro- 
grams in the arts entitled "creative 
courses in creative painting." during 
the summer the phillips memorial gal- 
lery had lent 22 works for display at 
the university. thus the gallery is 
entitled watkins gallery, after the 
late claw Watkins. 




Peacock cafe offer- 
ing THE FRIENDLIEST 
SERVICE AND THE 
FRESHEST OF GOURMET 
DELECTABLES. 



kramerbooks & 

Afterwords, offering 

a literary society 

ambience with its' 

adjacent bookstore. 

Sometimes all it 
takes is a foamy 
cappucino, with a 
touch of brown 
sugar. or maybe a 
Cafe au Lait. perhaps 
an Irish Coffee. The 
dim lighted atmo- 
sphere and the re- 
clining chair 
attittude of most 
cafes. you just want 
to have a heart to 
heart, you have to 
tell your best friend 
that you "lost it", 
you just want to 
chill because all of 
your friends just 
dont get it, but you 
need to figure things 

OUT. 



Dean &Deluca on M 

STREET OFFERS EVERY- 
THING FROM THE CAFE 
LIFE IN ADDITION TO ITS 
GOURMET MENU THAT 
OFFERS ONLY THE BEST 
OF INGREDIENTS. INSIDE 
YOU WILL ALSO FIND A 
MARKET THAT CARRIES 
THE FRESHEST FOODS 
AROUND. 



NEED A 

Koffeehauses in D.C. 



LIFT? 



~L>A^ 



|||k » fl T-rf'Hg 2iHL 




104 The Talon 




CAFE MlLANO, 
OFFERING THE 
ESSENCE OF 
EUROPE WITH ITS 
DECOR AND 
MUSIC. 



Au Pied du Cuchon, 

A 24 HR. DIVE FOR 

THOSE STARVING 

AFTER ATTENDING THE 

DEBAUCHERY OF 

THEIR PREFERENCE. 



Paolo's 
restaurant, 
known for 
it's irresist- 
ible italian 
dishes, as 

THEY SAY 

"pizza. pasta 

and, Pizazz." 

Owned by 

CMDC who 

run Old 

Glory, Club 

Zei,J. Paul's & 

Notte Luna. 



Parisian Caba- 
ret de 
Rochambeau. 
the finest of 
french food. 




g eorgetown has 
been the washington 
area's playground 
for more than 25 
years, its' trendy mix 
of saloons and res- 
taurants an attrac- 
tion to locals and 
tourists alike. 

you used to get 
all decked out to go 
to the restaurants 
in Georgetown de- 
cades AGO, ALTHOUGH 

you just wanted to 
be in a casual pub 
drinking a cold beer. 
Georgetown was fun 
during those years 
because of the en- 
tente cordiale be- 
tween the pub-crawl- 
ers and the restau- 
RANT goers. While 
Henry Kissinger 
dined at Rive Gauche, 
senators and con- 
gressmen would 
wind their way 
through the casual 
barroom's 
of Georgetown. 

Because it was a 
playground that 
lured the worldly 
as well as those who 
hoped to acquire 
some sophistication, 
Georgetown at- 
tracted ETHNIC 
RESTAURANTEURS WHO 
FELT THAT THE TRY- 
ANYTHING SPIRIT OF 
THE NEIGHBORHOOD 
WOULD ENSURE 
THEIR SUCCESS. 



Metro 105 




Think in The Morning. 

act in the noon. 

Eat in the evening. 

Sleep in the night. 

-William Blake 

The Washington Harbour 



BUKE WOULD BE 

ECSTATIC TO KNOW 

THAT THE 

Harbour can do 
all of those. 
Located on K St. 
in Georgetown, 
the Washington 
Harbour is in the 
middle of a 
bisiness district. 
Its small but 
quaint board- 
walk provides 
the tranquility 
overlooking the 
Potomac. It has 
a variety of 
small shops and 
galleries. but is 
also a block 
down from the 

HEART OF 

georgetown, 
at night the 
harbour claims 
its fame for the 
flavorful res- 
taurants by the 
water. the 
shocking Realist 
sculptures by 
Seward Johnson 
dominate the 
harbours 
beauty, attract- 
ing tourists 
from all over. 




View of the entrance 
of the Harbour from 
K st.. Statue en- 
titled The 
lunchbreak" 



View of the Harbour 
complex from the 
Potomac. The photo 
reveals the 
beautifull offices 
and condominiums of 
this goldmine 
property. 



This statue is 
located on the 
boardwalk itself. a 
view of the serenity 
of the potomac and 
its' aesthetic beauty. 



a close-up of the 
fountain and 
Seward Johnson's 
latest statue. 



106 The Talon 



Right foot, left foot up,jump 

Left Foot, right foot up,jump 

Both feet, jump around!! 



- Alona on "How to dance" 



Clubs in D.C. 

There is a big follow- 
ing of the international 
dance scene in D.C. Al- 
though the clubs are not 
open 'til the wee hours as 
they are in NYC, the clubs 
in D.C. have the funk and 
the technology that are 
incomparable. It is the 
techno, the house, the 
funk, the disco that makes 
one go crazy, and why 
not? Gotta let it out some- 
times. Don't mind the 
vanity of the scene, it adds 
humor and illustrocity to 
create the mystic of every 
interior. 

Club Zei, which 
opened June 1992 has 
given D.C. the quality of a 
serious club. With hired 
professional dancers, and 
technotic computer anima- 
tion on the 25 T.V. screens 
and its' Romanesque 
decor attracts those in gear 
and prepared to rage. 
Located in its personal 
alley "Zei Alley," the line 
goes out the door. 

But we all know the 
Fifth Column came first. 
The biggest club in D.C. 
attracting all those who 




visit here. It is a must see 
for those rich and famous 
who pop into D.C. for the 
weekend, or for those 
shooting a film on loca- 
tion. The four story two 
tier architecture holds a 
huge crowd, but its never 
enough room. 

Clubs come and go, but 
the Fifth has outlived them 
all, in its tenth year. You 



have seven areas to choose 
from, each different in 
decor and ambience. 

Then there is the SPY 
club, suited more for the 
'80's yuppie than for 
anyone else. The music is 
O.K., the decor is fair, but 
if you don't really know 
how to dance then the SPY 
club is what you are look- 
ing for. 





Metro 107 




the MUSIC 

it CREATES 



108 The Talon 



A center of business 
and industry by day 
and a cultural mecca by 
night — Georgetown has 
intrigued and captivated 
the hearts, minds and 
wallets of college students 
for years. Now there 
surfaces a frequently 
unexplored facet to the 



Georgetown personality, a 
facet with a rythm all its 
own. 

Just as rap music origi- 
nated in the Ghettoes of 
New York City as a means 
of expression for black 
youths, Washington, D.C. 
has now given birth to its 
own original sound and it 





resonates all over 
Georgetown. They call it 
Go Go and it is now 
making its way into 
mainstream music on 
almost every chart. One 
of the best known Go Go 
groups is Experience 
Unlimited (EU), whose hit 
song, Da Butt, premeired 
in Spike Lee's movie 
School Daze and rocked 
the charts in the late 80s. 
Go Go beats may now be 
heard in the music of 
TLC, REX N FX, Mary J. 
Blige and others. Almost 
every up tempo song that 
is aired in D.C. is first 
aired in its original form 
and a couple of months 
later reappears with a Go 
Go beat. 

The sound is the same 
sound produced by the 
young boys standing on 
the Georgetown street 
corners with empty plas- 
tic buckets and quicksil- 
ver hands. Using nothing 
more than discarded 
containers and their 
naked hands, the children 



Ld 

J 
D 
(/) 
Q. 
< 

u 

w 
I- 



The Old Stone house, 
3051 M St. n.w.is one 

OF THE OLDEST BUILD- 
INGS in the District, 
located in 
Georgetown, it was 
built in 1 765 and was 

EXPANDED lO YEARS 
LATER. THE HOUSE 
SERVED MANY PUR- 
POSES; RESIDENCY, A 
STORE. AND TODAY A 
HISTORICAL LANDMARK 



Metro 109 



"Part of 

Georgetown's 

magic is its 

ability to 

seemingly 

take its visitor 

into a 

different 

world- a 

world where 

there are no... 

boundaries/' 



(usually one every two 
blocks or so) make music 
to dance to, to laugh by 
and to rejoice with. 
Most are familiar with 
Georgetown as a hang- 
out for college students 
from most of the sur- 
rounding colleges and 
universities. Packed 
with restaurants, cloth- 
ing stores, night clubs 
and bars, Georgetown 
has been known to 
produce hours of enter- 
tainment for persons 
from all walks of life and 
spheres of interest. 
However, Georgetown 
has gone far beyond 
being just a local hang 
out. With its cobble 
stone roads and Victo- 
rian style townhouses, 
Georgetown has pro- 
duced some of the 



world's most noted arti- 
sans, public officials and 
influential community 
leaders. Similarly, Go Go 
has something to offer 
almost everyone. 
"It's nice. It's upbeat. It 
always makes me think 
about the things that make 
me feel good such as the 
things of summer. It 
brings back pleasant 
memories for me — no 
school, shorts, bumbing 
around, weird tourists, the 
fourth of July...," said 
Sarah Albert, a freshman 
lover of Rock N Roll. 
Part of Georgetown's 
magic is its ability to 
seemingly take its visitor 
into a different world — a 
world where there are no 
geograpic boundaries, no 
color lines, no cultural 
blocades, no religious 



walls. It's simply the 
people; the people and the 
food and the music. Go 
Go also posesses this 
unique quality. However, 
not all non native Wash- 
ingtonians share the en- 
thusiasm of Georgetown 
goers. 

"I can't stand it, but I'm 
from New York. It's just a 
more hype form of hip 
hop. I don't mind, though. 
I know it's a D.C./ Mary- 
land thang," said Michelle 
Wright, sophomore CLEG 
major and lover of R & B 
and Rap music." 
Despite disapproval of 
some non-natives, Go Go 
still rings strong, resound- 
ing on almost every corner 
of one of Washington, 
D.C.'s most unique areas 
of town, 
-by Joi Buckner 




110 The Talon 




fy 




A UNIQUE CITY 

...with a classic beat 



Metro 111 




"HOM 

WILL WORK" 

The lives of the homeless in D.C. 



It's 1 a.m. and I am 
coming back from the bar I 
usually frequent. I had 
such a good time. A 
couple of drinks on the 
house and I got to lay 
groundwork on my new 
perspective. But I have so 
much to do tomorrow... 
classes, workout, study for 
my art history class and sit 
on the computer for hours 
designing pieces for my 
portfolio. I look forward 
to going home and having 
a cup of hot cocoa before 
bed. 

But, as I pass Rock 
Creek Parkway there are 
the individuals on the 
median strip who don't 
have a place to call home. 
Suddenly the problems 
that I have are not prob- 
lems at all, but, blessings 
that they actually exist in 
my life. We have the 
opportunity to have an 
education and soak in all 
the knowledge that we 
can, and have the opportu- 
nity of the upper-middle 
to high-class to have the 
time to apply ourselves to 
be the person we are 
destined. We have the 



time to go and meet the 
people that bring out the 
beauty of life, and the time 
to find our soul-mate. We 
have time to discover our 
favorite foods, our favorite 
sports, our favorite type of 
beer, and what wine goes 
best with what entree. 
Our lives allow us to 
discover so many things, 
the wonderful rhythms of 
life; its ups and its downs. 

These people on the 
median strip know only of 
survival and attempt to 
deduce the best ways to 
keep warm in the freezing 
nights of winter, while I 
have just come back from 
a warm bar filled with 
warm friends and a good 
buzz. What right is it that 
they do not have the 
chance that we have? 
Why do I have this small 
fortune in life, but they do 
not? All of what is mine 
suddenly is disgusting and 
useless, because the man 
on the median strip, a 
human being just like me, 
can not have the same. Is 
it the system? Is it that 
they do not have the 
drive? Is it that they are 



uneducated, because their 
parents brought them up 
living in an unsheltered 
environment? Or have 
they once been successful, 
but fell ill? Did their 
parents die young? Were 
they in a mental hospital 
that could not afford to 
keep them and just let 
them out on the street? 
How sad, how very disap- 
pointing in the delicate 
unbalance of life. 

The sad part about it 
all is that we all go home 
and drink our hot cocoa, 
and go to sleep thinking 
what a good night it was. 

-BY ALONA ELKAYAM 





2 The Talon 








v>x^\ 



Metro 113 




That Make You Go 

Hmmm... 

What Happened in 1992-93? 




114 The Talon 



WAR IN SOMALIA 



Wretched is he who has bound the 

land to himself... 




Ever heard of the 
"strategic Horn of Africa?" 
It was the region of East 
Africa, including Somalia 
and Ethiopia, that was 
considered crucial in the 
global battle between 
communism and democ- 
racy. First the Soviet 
Union, then the United 
States poured millions of 
dollars' worth of weap- 
onry into the sparsely 
populated country of 
Somalia. When the cold 
war ended, so did super- 
power interest, and the 
well-armed but weakly- 
governed Somalia deterio- 
rated into areas controlled 
by local warlords fighting 
each for territory and food. 

Where man left off the 
killing, nature stepped in. 
Three years of drought 
have dried up water 
supplies, killed livestock 
and baked cornfields into 
concrete. As a result, 
nearly half a million Soma- 
lis have died of hunger. 
Aid sent to starving areas 
was hijacked; the war- 
lords discovered that food 
was a good way to pay for 
more weapons, and over 
75% of aid was stolen. The 
U.N. estimated at one 
point that 2.5 million 



Somalis would die as a 
result of the famine and 
the lack of aid. 

In order to get aid to 
those in need, the U.S. sent 
a force of 30,000 to Somalia 
in early December to 
establish feeding centers, 
and make sure the food 
aid reaches those centers, 
and also to build an infra- 
structure of roads, run- 
ways, etc. that will make 
the providing of aid easier 
to do as the U.S. forces 
pass along responsibility 
for the project to the U.N. 



...a fool is he 

who is greedy 

when others 

possess. Life 

ON EARTH 

PASSES AWAY, IT 

IS NOT LONG; HE 

IS FORTUNATE 

WHO HAS A GOOD 

REMEMBERANCE 

IN IT. 

-THE TEACHING 

FOR MERIKARE 

C.2135-2040 B.C. 




It has been just over two short years 
that the conflict known to all as op- 
eration desert storm, was blazing high 
in the Perian Gulf, the largest U.S. 

MILITARY OFFENSIVE SINCE THE VIETNAM 
WAR, TWENTY WARS EARLIER. THE SITUATION 
IN THE PERIAN GULF AREA IS FAR FROM 
BEING SOLVED TODAY. SADDAM HUSSEIN WAS 
NOT REMOVED FROM POWER DURING OPERA- 
TION Desert Storm, and is still stirring 

UP TROUBLE. 



Metro 115 




Global Unrest 

The War in Former Yugoslavia 



Created as the result of 
one war, Yugoslavia's 
breakup was the result of 
another. The victors of 
World War I created 
Yugoslavia from the re- 
mains of the Austro- 
Hungarian Empire. The 
country was an assem- 
blage of neighboring 
ethnic groups, most of 
which did not get along 
with one another. Yugo- 
slavia was nevertheless 
fairly stable for most of the 
years, due in part to the 
balance of the Cold War; 
ethnic rivalries were 



subdued by larger rivalries 
between East and West. 
This stability came to 
an end in 1991, when first 
the regions of Slovenia 
and Croatia, then Bosnia- 
Herzegovinia, declared 
independence from the 
Serbian-dominated gov- 
ernment in Belgrade. Each 
of these regions contained 
Serbian minorities, and to 
the Serbians, not enough 
was being done to protect 
their status. With help 
from the Serbian elements 
of the Federal Army, the 
Serbian minorities fought 



the newly formed national 
militias to a standstill in 
Slovenia and Croatia, and 
instituted a policy of 
"ethnic cleaning," in 
which Muslims are either 
killed or expelled. 

The flood of thousands 
of refugees have over- 
whelmed neighboring 
countries, and led to 
pictures e.g. the cover of 
TIME (Aug. 17, 1992) of 
emaciated prisoners at a 
Serbian detention camp, 
captioned 
"Must It Go On?". 

-Ann Ridenour 




116 The Talon 




Metro 117 




...But to few men comes 
the gift of excellence 



In diving, Mary 
ellen clark 

WINS THE 

BRONZE FROM 

THE 10 METER 

PLATFORM. 







Not since 1492 and 
the Golden Century 
to follow, had Spain been 
given so much attention. 
But 500 years later with 
the Summer Olympics 
held in Barcelona, 1992 
was the Year of Spain. For 
a nation torn between its' 
own past and the modern 
and dynamic of its' neigh- 
boring countries, the 
Olympics gave Spain the 
opportunity to show off 
itself and gain respect as 
an equal among European 
nations. 

Just as the Olympics 
were good for Spain, so 
was Spain good for the 
United States. Spain 
brought fortune to the U.S. 
Olympic Team, who came 
out on top, but not with- 
out hardship. 

Gail Devers of 
Palmdale, California ran 
the closest sprint in Olym- 
pic history, winning the 
100-meter race by all of 
one-hundredth of a sec- 
ond, but equally stunning 
was her personal victory. 
Just one year before 
Devers couldn't even walk 
and almost had her feet 



118 The Talon 




Summer Olympics Barcelona 1992 



amputated as a result of 
Graves' Disease, a thyroid 
condition she had been 
fighting for three years. 

The U.S. Swim Team 
brought home 1 1 gold 
medals, nine silver and 
seven bronze, 13 of which 
were awarded to the men 
who surprised fans and 
critics who had little faith 
in their ability to win. The 
reason: most of the men 
were either old-timers, 
drug and alcohol abusers 
or had faced a terrible 
tragedy. 

Nelson Diebel, 21, was 
the first to show off his 
stuff, when he won the 
gold in the 100-meter 
breaststroke. Diebel took 
the long road to the Olym- 
pics. Since the age of 12, he 
was hooked on drugs and 
alcohol and was later 
kicked out of school. He 
got his act together, how- 
ever, and finished among 
the top five American 
swimmers for the 1988 
Olympic trials and won 
the gold in 1992. 

Pablo Morales made a 
large comeback after 
losing in 1984 and not 



even making the team in 
1988. He was determined 
to win the gold in 1992 
and did so. And Mike 
Barrowman had his own 
personal struggle. His 
father became very ill 
during the trials and died 
just weeks later. But 
Barrowman gave it his all 
and he, too, won the gold. 

"Just as the Olym- 
pics were good 
for Spain, so was 
Spain good for 
the United States. 
Spain brought 
fortune to the 
U.S. Olympic 
Team, who came 
out on top, but 
not without hard- 
ship." 



Carl lewis won two 

gold medals this 

time. one for the 

long jump and one in 

the 400-meter relay. 







Metro 119 




"For the past decade, 
attempts have been made 
to sweep our urban areas 
under the carpet." 

— Senator Chris 
Dodd, D. Conn. 

Those of you who 
thought Los Angeles was 
the city of glamour, stars 
and dreams come true, 
should get a reality check. 
The world discovered just 
how real L.A. is, when, in 
April 1992, the city fell to 
rioting and looting. Inertia 
and poor organization by 
both the Los Angeles 
Police Department and the 
government did little to 
alleviated the problem. 

The L.A. riots were 
sparked by the outrage of 
minority Angelenos 
(blacks, Hispanics and 
whites) at the acquittal of 
four white officers who 
had allegedly beaten a 
black civilian. The looters 
destroyed neighborhoods 
and businesses, caused 56 
deaths and resulted in at 
least 1500 civil cases. 
While the city has always 
been a multicultural one, it 
is a segregated city as 



Trouble at the 
homefront 

L.A. Riots Affecting the Nation 




blacks, Hispanics and 
whites and other minori- 
ties flock to their respec- 
tive communities. More- 
over, the segregation cuts 
the Hispanic communities 
even deeper, separating 
Nicaraguans, El Salvador- 
ans and Mexicans. 

Racial discrimination 
subtly reared its' ugly 
head through the media 
and the marketplace. 



National stereotypes have 
been shaped largely by 
what is on TV or in the 
movie theaters, and thus 
influences white percep- 
tions of minorities, in 
particular, blacks. Black 
stereotypes are one of two 
extremes; the lower class 
and uneducated, as por- 
trayed in sitcoms like 
"What's Happening?", or 
the upper class and well- 



educated, as portrayed in 
"The Cosby Show". Re- 
cently the latter has de- 
clined and more and more 
lower class blacks are 
being seen on the screen as 
in films such as "New Jack 
City". 

L.A. has been consid- 
ered the city of the future 
since many other cities 
mirror its' problems. 
According to The Enter- 



120 The Talon 



prise Foundation, cities 
nationwide experience 
more poverty, fewer low- 
income housing, more 
homeless, more high 
school dropouts and more 
drugs. With the growing 
interracial problems like 
that of L.A., we are headed 
down a long and winding 
road of destruction unless 
there is action. 

Since the riots, the city 
of L.A. has experienced a 
brutally slow recovery that 
has, for the most part, 
been placed on the back 
burner by federal and city 
government officials. City 
damages, alone, account 
for six billion, yet the only 
aid being offered is one of 
a private partnership 
involving L.A. Mayor Tom 
Bradley and businessman 
Peter Ueberroth. There is 
almost no innercity devel- 
opment, and what little 
aid Congress conjured last 
year was ultimately vetoed 
by Bush, who delegated a 
mere 2.3 million to cities. 

With a new president 
in the White House, there 
is hope that some federal 
aid proposals will be 
passed. They include 
improving public safety, 
education, housing and 
transportation; infrastruc- 
ture projects that could 
put thousands to work; 
various tax breaks; job 
training and loans. "Job 




creation is the most essen- 
tial issue about solving 
this problem," said Sena- 
tor Donald Riegle (D. 
Mich.), "we cannot begin 
to make serious inroads 
until we begin to create 
jobs." 

When Rodney King 
was stopped by police on a 
Los Angeles freeway, 
police say he resisted them 
and was beaten. Someone 
videotaped the melee and 
released the tape to local 
television stations. It 
received national atten- 
tion, and four white offic- 
ers were charged in the 
beating of King, who was 
black. But when a jury 



found them innocent of 
any wrong-doing, three 
days of rioting hit Los 
Angeles. When it ended, 
52 people were dead; 2,383 
were injured; 18,807 were 
arrested and ty damage 
was estimated at $785 
million. 

And for the music 
makers, they had a lot to 
sing about speaking out 
against the underlying 
issue of racism. Rapper 
Ice-T ignited furor with his 
song "Cop Killer." Ice-T 
said the song was a warn- 
ing to the Los Angeles 
police, whom he accused 
of brutality referring 



specifically to the video- 
taped police beating of 
Rodney King and its 
aftermath of riots.The 
singer later removed the 
song from his "Body 
Count" album after the 
law enforcement officials 
and others criticized Time 
T for allowing the song to 
be distributed on the 
company's record label. 

-by Sharon Ezrin 



111 
_l 
D 
(/) 

n 
< 
U 

W 



April 1966. 
two years 
before the 
death of mar- 
TIN Luther 
King Jr., 
occured the 
Watts Riot. 
Watts now 

CALLLED 

Compton, the 
south central 
part of los 
angeles. This 
riot was very 
similiar to the 
most recent 
la riots. , a 
police shoot- 
ing in the 
prominently 
black neigh- 
BORHOOD 
TURNED INTO A 
FULLSCALE RIOT 



Metro 121 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 



1893 - 1993 



Student Clubs , 

Organizations and 

Governing Bodies 




Former President Richard 
Berendzen on the A-TV show 
Midnight with David Noll. 
(Photograph by Julie Fraize.) 



ACADEMIC AND 
PROFESSIONAL 

Association of 
Computing Machinery 

Providing services and 
exposure for students 
interested in professional 
computing, computer 
science, informational and 
computational science, the 
Association works to 
enhance education in 
computations. 



Data Processing 
Management Association 

This group of students is 
interested in building 
contacts within the 
computer industry for 
interested students. 

AU Educators 

Giving education-minded 
students opportunities to 
learn about the field. 

Forensics 

The debate club competes 
successfully in 
tournaments around the 
country. 



German Club 

Promoting a better 
understanding of German 
history, literature, culture 
and language. 

AU Naturel 

An intellectual and social 
exchange for students with 
an interest in biology. 

Public Relations Student 
Society of America 

PRSSA is a professional 
organization for those 
interested in the public 
relations field. Members 
often later join the parent 
organization PRSA. 



124 The Talon 




Left: members of the A.U. 
Orchestra 

Below: A member of Hillel 
showing support on a blus- 
tery day. 

Sapere Aude 

Sapere Aude is a group 
which promotes 
intellectual discourse, 
inviting faculty and staff 
to speak on various topics. 

Society for Human 
Resources Management 

This group of both 
graduate and 
undergraduate students 
offer support for students 
intending to enter the 
Human Resource 
Management field. 

Society of Professional 
Journalists 

These future journalists in 
the School of 
Communication work to 
further their prospective 
careers. 

Accounting Club 

Providing students with 
knowledge above that 
which is found in the 
classroom about 
accounting as a skill and 
as a career. 



BUSINESS CLUBS 
AND ASSOCIATIONS 

Alpha Kappa Psi 

Alpha Kappa Psi is the co- 
ed business fraternity for 
students interested in 
business administration 
and related fields. It gives 
them opportunities to 
meet other business- 
minded students and also 
make contacts in the 
business world. 
American Marketing 
Association 

Through various speakers, 
trips and other programs 
the American Marketing 
Association works to 
familiarize students with 
what marketing is all 
about. 

Organizations 125 



did 
YOUO 

know* 



In September of 
1 992 the top ten 
grossing films were: 

1 . HONEYMOON IN 
VEGAS 

2. UNFORGIVEN 

3. PET SEMATARY TWO 

4. SINGLE WHITE 
FEMALE 

5. DEATH BECOMES HER 

6. RAPID FIRE 

7. A LEAGUE OF THEIR 
OWN 

8. TWIN PEAKS: FIRE 
WALK WITH ME 

9. 3 NINJAS 

10. SISTER ACT 

In May of 1992 
(Graduation time) 
the top ten grossing 
films were: 

1 . INDECENT PROPOSAL 

2. WHO'S THE MAN? 

3. THE SANDLOT 

4. BENNY & JOON 

5. INDIAN SUMMER 

6. THE DARK HALF 

7. COP AND A HALF 

8. BOILING POINT 

9. HUCK FINN 

10. THIS BOY'S LIFE 




1893 - 1993 



Members of the Wanwha-Do 

Club (Photography by Matt 

Lovering). 



Association of Future 
Entrepreneurs 

Exposing members to the 
entrepreneurial spirit 
within the American 
community. 

Finance Club 

The student involvement 
arm of the Kogod College 
of Business 
Administration, The 
Finance Club explores the 
field of finance as a career. 

Freshman-Sophomore 
Business Club 

The FSBC challenges and 
invites incoming freshmen 
to further their education 
in an out-of-class 
environment in order to 
become better acquainted 
with the business world. 

International Business 
Club 

The IBC serves as an 
interface between the 
undergraduate student 
body and the international 
business community. 

Undergraduate Business 
Association 

Providing members with 
the opportunity to work as 
a unit within the AU 
community and serving as 
an umbrella organization 
for affiliated groups, the 
UBA promotes business 
interests at American. 

CLUB SPORTS 

Fa Zhuan Tao 

Fa Zhuan Tao is a 
constantly changing 
martial art incorporating 
many different techniques 
to achieve the most 
efficient method of self- 
defense. 
Fencing Club 
Active students working 
for the promotion of the 
sport and the discipline of 
fencing. 




Karatedo Doshinkan AU 
Club 

While training students in 
the art of Karatedo 
Doshinkan, this club also 
emphasizes virtues like 
respect, honor, and 
positivity without 
competition. 

AU Jiu-jitsu Club 

Students interested in self- 
defense can join this group 
dedicated to learning in 
the traditional Jiu-jitsu 
form. 

AU Men's Volleyball 
Club 

This club is working to 
enjoy the thrill of men's 
volleyball competition on 
an intercollegiate level. 

American University 
Rugby Football Club 

Preparing interested 
students for the game of 
rugby by teaching the 
skills needed and 
providing the discipline. 



Wonwha-Do 

These students also work 
in the study and practice 
of self-defense in the form 
of the unified martial art 
Wonwha-Do. 



GOVERNING 
BODIES 
STUDENT 
CONFEDERATION 

Black Student Alliance 

The BSA is an organization 
which works to address 
and raise awareness of 
racial issues and concerns 
at American. 

Confederation Media 
Commission 

The CMC regulates 
elections and other 
business of the various 
individual campus media 
while always working in 
the best interests of 
campus media on the 
whole. 



126 The Talon 




Inter-Club Council 

The ICC is a committee 
made up of student-body 
members which regulates 
and allocates money to the 
University's more than 50 
clubs. 

International Student 
Association 

The ISA is an umbrella 
organization which is 
comprised of the various 
nationality clubs on 
campus. It is a voice for 
international students and 
it works for the cross 
cultural learning within 
the student body. 



Kennedy Political Union 

KPU is one of the largest 
budgeted organization on 
campus. It is a student 
group which brings 
various speakers to 
campus to address 
students on many different 
topics. This year's 
speakers included Colin 
Powell, John McFarlane, 
and Caspar Weinberger. 

Model United Nations 

MUN's purpose is to give 
students an understanding 
of the U.N., the art of 
diplomacy, public 
speaking and negotiation. 
Members participate in 
national and international 
Conferences. 




Orientation Assistants 

A division of the Office of 
Student Activities, this 
group of students help 
guide new students 
through the initial days of 
the college experience and 
also provide programs to 
acquaint new parents and 
students alike. 

Residence Hall 
Association 

The RHA is the governing 
body for all residence halls 
made up of elected 
student representatives. 
The RHA acts as a liaison 
between on campus 
students and 
administration, and also 
provides students with 
activities within the 
residence halls. 

Student Advocacy Center 

We serve as a 
communication link 
between students and the 
administration when 
students encounter a 
problem with American 
University. 
Student Union Board 
SUB organizes concerts, 
movies, comedy 
performances and other 
entertainment for 
students. This year, SUB's 
highlights included the a 
10,000 Maniacs concert 
and a free show by Blues 
Traveller. 

Women's Confederation 

The Women's 
Confederation works to 
address and raise 
awareness of issues 
concerning women at AU 
and nationwide. 

Left: An R.H.A. sponsored 
dinner. 



Organizations 127 



did 
YOU«P 

know* 



In September of 
1 992 the top ten 
television programs 
were: 

1 . ROSEANNE 

2. 48 HOURS 

3. MURPHY BROWN 

4. COACH 

5. THE 44TH ANNUAL 
EMMY AWARDS 

6. UNSOLVED 
MYSTERIES 

7. 60 MINUTES 

8. BLOSSOM 

9. FULL HOUSE 

10. STEP BY STEP 

In May of 1992 
(Graduation time) 
the top ten 
television programs 

were: 

1 . MOVIE: CALL OF THE 
WILD 

2. ROSEANNE 

3. CHEERS 

4. HOME IMPROVEMENT 

5. SEINFELD 

6. 60 MINUTES 

7. MOVIE: WALKER, 
TEXAS RANGER 

8. MURDER, SHE WROTE 

9. RESCUE 91 1 

10. DELTA 




GREEK 
ORGANIZATION 

Pan Hellenic Council 

Chapters 

Alpha Kappa Alpha 

Founded :1977 

Colors: Salmon Pink and 

Green 

Symbol: Ivy 

Kappa Alpha Psi 

Founded: 1980 
Colors: lack and Gold 
Symbol: Sphinx of Giza 

Delta Sigma Theta 

Founded: 1976 
Colors: Red and Black 
Symbol: Elephant 

Interfraternity Council 

Chapters 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

Founded: 1940 

Colors: Cardinal and Stone 

Symbol: Phoenix 

Alpha Tau Omega 

Founded: 1865 

Colors: Sky Blue and Old 

Gold 

Symbol: Maltese Cross 

Delta Chi 

Founded: 1990 
Colors: Red and Bluff 

Delta Tau Delta 

Founded: 1986 

Colors: Purple, White and 

Gold 

Symbol: Crescent 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Founded: 1873 

Colors: Blood Red and 

Gold 

Symbol: Triple Tees 

Sigma Alpha Mu 

Founded: 1987 

Colors: Purple and White 

Symbol: Yosemite Sam 



Zeta Beta Tau 

Founded: 1898 
Colors: Blue and White 
Symbol: Skull and 
Crossbones 

Pan Hellenic Association 

Chapters 

Alpha Chi Omega 

Colors: Scarlet Red and 
Olive Green 
Symbol: Lyre 

Alpha Epsilon Phi 

Founded: 1909 

Colors: Green and White 

Symbol: Columns 

Chi Omega 

Colors: Red and Yellow 
Symbols: The Owl 

Delta Gamma 

Founded :1936 

Colors: Bronze, Pink and 

Blue 

Symbol: Anchor 

PhiMu 

Founded: 1852 
Colors: Rose and White 
Symbol: Sir Fidel 

Phi Sigma Sigma 

Founded: 1962 

Colors: King Blue and 

Gold 

Symbol: Sphinx 

Sigma Delta Tau 

Founded: 1987 
Colors: Cafe au Lait and 
Old Blue 
Symbol: Torch 



INTERNATIONAL 
AND NATIONALITY 
ORGANIZATIONS 

African/Caribbean Stu- 
dent Association 

The ACSA works to 
promote awareness of 
African and Caribbean 
culture and provide 
members with an 
opportunity to meet other 
students from Africa and 
the Caribbean islands. 

Arab Student Club 

The ASC brings together 
Arab students and works 
to inform the AU 
community of Arab 
culture. 

Armenian Club 
The Club works to provide 
interaction for Armenian 
student and also to teach 
other students about 
Armenian Culture. 

Chinese Scholar & Stu- 
dent Association 

This group plans activities 
with Chinese students and 
scholars and introduces 
Chinese culture as well as 
learns others. 

Club Latino American 

Through conducting social 
and cultural activities, the 
Club Latino American 
promotes unity and 
greater awareness of the 
heritage of the people of 
the people of Latin 
America. 

Opposite Top: Sponsorship is 

shown during a ZBT telephone 

drive 

Opposite Bottom: This car was 

placed on the Quad by the DeltE 

Tau Delta Fraternity to reminc 

students of the effects oj 

drinking and driving 



1893 - 1993 



128 The Talon 




Fieri 

As the student chapter of 
the National Italian- 
American Young 
Professionals 
Organization, Fieri 
promotes Italian culture 
through lectures, meals 
and other programs 
around the AU 
community. 

The French Connection 

This organization works to 
enhance awareness and 
appreciation of the French 
language and culture. 
They sponsor various on 
and off campus programs 
to further this end. 

Friends of Lebanon 

This organization is 
dedicated to the Lebanese 
culture and also provides 
opportunities for Lebanese 
students to share their 
experiences with other 
students. 



The Hellenic Society 

By bringing together 

Greeks, Cypriots and 

friends of the club, this 

organization conducts 

various activities to inform 

people of this unique 

culture. 

The Indian Club at 

American 

TICA works for the 

students involved to 

contribute to the academic, 

social and cultural 

knowledge of the 

civilization of India. 

Iranian Cultural 
Association 

The ICA learns about 
other cultures while 
introducing information 
about Iranian Culture to 
interested students. 




Organizations 129 



did 
YOU«P 

know* 



In September of 
1 992 the top three 
best-selling books 
were: 

FICTION 

1 . GERALD'S GAME 

2. WAITING TO EXHALE 

3. THE PELICAN BRIEF 

NON FICTION 

1. THE SILENT PASSAGE: 
MENOPAUSE 

2. TRUMAN 

3. THE LAST TSAR: THE LIFE 
AND DEATH OF 
NICHOLAS II 

In May of 1992 
(Graduation time) 
the top three best- 
selling books were: 

FICTION 

1. THE CLIENT 

2. THE BRIDGES OF 
MADISON COUNTY 

3. "J" IS FOR JUDGEMENT 

NON FICTION 

1 . BEATING THE STREET 

2. WOMEN WHO RUN 
WITH THE WOLVES 

3. HEALING THE MIND 




1893 - 1993 



Talon Arts team member April 

Cantor lets off some steam 

during an intense layout 

session. 

Japan America Club 

Bringing about a greater 
cultural understanding 
between Japanese and 
American culture, the 
Japan America Club 
invites scholars of Japan 
and sponsors many cross- 
cultural events. 

Korean Student 
Association 

Promoting membership 
among AU Korean and 
Korean-American students 
while also publicizing 
Korea, the Korean Student 
Club works to expose 
Korea to interested 
members of the AU 
community while in turn 
exposing AU to 
prospective Korean 
students. 

AU Lebanon Organiza- 
tion 

Spreading understanding 
of Lebanese Culture and 
Society among Americans 
and other cultures, this 
group brings together 
Lebanese students in 
various on-campus 
activities. 

Muslim Student Associa- 
tion 

This group facilitates 
awareness of Islam in the 
community and works for 
interaction between 
Muslims and AU at large. 

Pacific Affairs Group 

The organization provides 
information on and pro- 
motes interest in the affairs 
of the Pacific Region. 

Palestinian Academic 
Freedom Network 
(PAFNet) 

This is an organization 
designed to establish 
relationships between AU 
students and faculty and 




those in the occupied 
territories. 

The Scandinavian Club 

This club eases the 
transition of 
Scandinavians inter the 
American University 
environment by enhancing 
the international focus of 
American University 
through the formal 
development of an 
understanding of 
Scandinavian culture. 



Spanish Club 

The Spanish Club 
promotes the 
understanding of Spanish 
and Spanish-speaking 
cultures through various 
international activities. 



Sri-Lankan Student Asso- 
ciation 

This organizations 
provides Sri-Lankan 
students with an 
opportunity to meet with 
others from their 
homeland while 
promoting awareness of 
issues concerning the Sri- 
Lankan people. 

Slainte 

This group supports 
education about and 
involvement in the Irish 
culture and seeks a 

eeaceful solutions for a 
'nited Ireland. 



130 The Talon 




Turkish American Stu- 
dent Association 

Working to provide a 
better understanding of 
Turkish history, culture 
and politics, this 
organization works to 
foster personal ties and 
friendships between 
Turkish, American and 
other international 
students. 



MEDIA 



A-TV 

A-TV is AU's student-run 
television station. The 
station broadcasts news, 
talk, comedy and special 
feature programs on a 
daily basis. 

American Literary Maga- 
zine 

Usually published twice a 
year, AmLit prints poetry, 
illustrations and works of 
creative fiction by 
members of the AU 
community. 



The Eagle 

The Eagle is AU's student- 
run newspaper. The Eagle 
is published weekly and 
covers news events and 
issues of importance or 
interest to students, faculty 
and employees of the 
University. The Eagle 
also features an 
entertainment section and 
award-winning coverage 
of AU athletics. 

International Voice 

The International Voice is 
published weekly and 
covers events of interest to 
AU's international student 
body. 

The Rostrum 

The Rostrum publishes 
articles and essays 
expressing the views of 
students and faculty on 
political issues. 

The Talon 

The Talon is the yearbook 
of the American 
University. An annual 
publication covering 
various aspects of the 
undergraduate community 
on and off campus. 



Uhuru 

Uhuru covers issues of 
importance to minority 
students both at AU and 
nationwide. 

WVAU 

WVAU functions as a 
training facility for those 
interested in a radio 
career, while providing 
entertainment and a 
creative outlet as well. 
WVAU is also a news 
media and a forum for 
discussing politics, sports 
and other topics of concern 
to AU students. 



PERFORMING ARTS 
CLUBS 

American University 
Concert Choir 

This choir promotes 
musical excellence 
through the mastering and 
performance of large 
ensemble vocal repertoire. 



Left: Staff members of The 
Eagle, the weekly student 
newspaper. 



American University 
Gospel Choir 

Dedicated to creating a 
spiritual atmosphere in 
song, this choir works to 
bring unity through spiri- 
tual means in a social 
setting. 

Music Society 

The AU Music Society 
brings together students 
with various musical 
talents to provide activities 
on and off campus for all 
to enjoy. 

AU Players 

The Players are dedicated 
to promoting and produc- 
ing the performing arts on 
the campus of American 
University. 

Pizazz 

Pizazz is a singing and 
dancing troupe whose 
repertoire ranges from 
Broadway to cabaret. The 
groups travels around the 
DC area performing at 
various functions. 

AU Singers 
The Singers promote 
musical excellence 
through mastering com- 
plex pieces and perform- 
ing them for the enjoy- 
ment of the students of 
American. 



Organizations 131 



did 
YOU«P 

know« 

In September of 1 992 
the top ten pop albums 
were: 



1 . BILLY RAY CYRUS 

Some Gave All 

2. BOBBY BROWN 
Bobby 

3. PEARL JAM 
Ten 

4. ERIC CLAPTON 
Unplugged 

5. GARTH BROOKS 
Beyond the Season 

6. KRISS KROSS 
Totally Krossed Out 

7. BOOMERANG SDTRK. 

8. TEMPLE OF THE DOG 

9. ELTON JOHN 
The One 

1 0. MEGADETH 



Countdo 



• to Extinction 



RELIGIOUS ORGANI- 
ZATIONS 

Catholic Student 
Association 

The largest student organi- 
zation on campus, the CSA 
works to promote unity 
among Catholic students 
and works to enhance the 
spiritual life of both is 
members and the AU 
community at large. 

AU Christian Network 
The purpose of this 
organization is to foster 
knowledge of Jesus Christ 
and Biblical Christianity 
among the students of 
American University. 



AU Gay and Lesbian 
Christian Association 

An ecumenical group that 
seeks to provide an open 
and affirming ministry to 
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and 
supportive individuals 
within American 
University and extended 
community. 

Hillel Student Associa- 
tion 

Hillel provides facilities, 
guidance and organization 
for religious, cultural, 
educational, social, social 
welfare, and interfaith 
activities for Jewish 
students at American 
University. 



In May of 1992 
(Graduation time) the 
top ten pop albums 



Protestant Student Asso- 
ciation 

The Protestant Student 
Association is a 
representative 
organization which 
consists of members of 
various Protestant groups 
on campus. The PSA 
sponsors and coordinates 
interdenominational, 
interfaith and 
interreligious activities. 



SCHOOL COUNCILS 

College of Arts and Sci- 
ences Student Union 

This group coordinates 
student events for the CAS 
and CAS related 
organizations, and it also 
plans the annual CAS 
Student Research 
Conference. 




AEROSMITH 



2. THE BODYGUARD 
SDTRK. 
KENNY G 

Breathless 

SPIN DOCTORS 

Pocket Full of Kryptonite 

ERIC CLAPTON 

Unplugged 
DR. DRE 

The Chronic 

PRIMUS 

Pork Soda 
SNOW 

12 Indies of Snow 

SILK 

Lose Control 
10. SADE 
Love Deluxe 



132 The Talon 




American Students 
Against Poverty (ASAP) 

ASAP is committed to 
developing a vision to end 
absolute poverty, raising 
consciousness in the AU 
community about poverty 
and homelessness, taking 
direct action in D.C. and 
supporting hunger relief 
which empowers those in 
need. 

Habitat for Humanity 

This is a Campus Service 
Organization which works 
with local and national 
affiliates to eradicate 
poverty housing through 
fund-raising and 
construction work. 

R.E.S.U.L.T.S. 

RESULTS is a political 
lobby group designed to 
create a political will to 
END hunger. 




School of International 
Service Undergraduate 
Cabinet 

The SIS Undergraduate 
Cabinet plans and 
implements events to 
further SIS undergrad 
education, and it also acts 
as a liaison between the 
SIS administration and the 
students. 

School of Public Affairs 
Undergraduate Council 

The SPA Undergraduate 
Council programs 
activities for SPA students 
and is a resource for 
student interested in 
furthering their education 
outside the classroom. 

Left:the students of Amnesty 
International (Photo by Matt 
Lovering). 

Above: One of the many 
speakers at the Kennedy 
Political Union. 



Undergraduate Business 
Association 

This group provides 
business students with 
information and 
opportunities to enhance 
their education through 
developing on and off- 
campus contacts. It also 
produces programs for the 
AU business community 
and community at large. 



SERVICE 
ORGANIZATIONS 

American's Best Buddies 

Best Buddies is a 
voluntary organization 
which facilitates lasting 
friendships between 
college students and 
members of our 
community who are 
mentally retarded. 



Students of American 
Volunteer Effort 
(S.A.V.E.) 

SAVE serves as a 
clearinghouse for AU 
students to volunteer at 
private social service 
agencies such as soup 
kitchens, homeless shelters 
and after-school programs 
throughout Washington 
D.C. 



SPECIAL INTEREST 
ORGANIZATIONS 

Amnesty International 

Amnesty International is a 
world-wide non-profit 
organization which works 
for the release of those not 
using or advocating 
violence who have Deen 
imprisoned because of 
their political beliefs, race, 
sex, religion, language, or 
ethnic origin. 



Organizations 133 



did 
YOU^ 

know* 



In September of 
1 992 the top ten 
video rentals were: 

1 . WAYNE'S WORLD 

2. WHITE MEN CAN'T 
JUMP 

3. FRIED GREEN 
TOMATOES 

4. THE PRINCE OF TIDES 

5. MEDICINE MAN 

6. FINAL ANALYSIS 

8. MEMOIRS OF AN 
INVISIBLE MAN 

9. HOOK 

10. GRAND CANYON 

In May of 1992 
(Graduation time) 
the top ten video 
rentals were: 

1. UNDER SIEGE 

2. PASSENGER 57 

3. THE MIGHTY DUCKS 

4. THE PLAYER 

5. HERO 

6. THE LAST OF THE 
MOHICANS 

7. SNEAKERS 

8. A LEAGUE OF THEIR 
OWN 

9. CONSENTING ADULTS 

10. HONEYMOON IN 
VEGAS 





1893 - 1993 



American Students for 
Israel 

ASI works to further both 
the economic and military 
support of the state of 
Israel by the U.S. 
government. 

Animals United for the 
Rights of Animals 

This is an on-campus 
organization designed to 
educate the students and 
faculty of on-going animal 
rights issues and raise 
general awareness in the 
animal rights arena. 

Aspiring Lawyers 

This group of students acts 
as a source of information 
for students interested in 
the legal field. They 
sponsor speakers, provide 
internships and travel to 
law schools in the area. 

AU for Choice 

AU for choice fights to 
ensure the reproductive 
rights of all women. 

AU Chess Club 

The Chess Club works to 
promote Chess within the 
AU community through 
lessons, tournaments and 
unofficial matches. 



The American University 
College Democrats 

This group works to 
organize democratic 
students on campus, 
sponsors speakers, 
discussions, and rallies to 
both support and further 
democratic interests as 
well as the good of the AU 
community. 

The American University 
College Republicans 

Dedicated to promoting 
Republican ideologies and 
providing its membership 
access to debate and 
speaker forums, this group 
takes full advantage of the 
political setting of 
Washington D.C. 

Friends of the Old Repub- 
lic 

FOR is an alternative 
newspaper which 
espouses conservative 
principles in a humorous, 
informative and timely 
fashion. 



The Gay, Lesbian, 
Bisexual Community 

This group provides a 
support network for other 
gay, lesbian and bisexual 
students, faculty and staff, 
as well as provides an 
opportunity for interaction 
between the Gay and 
Lesbian Community and 
members of the 
heterosexual community 
atAU. The GLC is also 
dedicated to ending 
discrimination and 
prejudice against gays in 
all its facets. 

Millimeter (Undergradu- 
ate Film Production Club) 

This group works to 
motivate and facilitate film 
production outside the 
classroom. 

New Progressive Party — 
Parido Nuevo Progesista 

This club works to 
promote Puerto Rican 
Statehood among AU 
students and encourage 
Puerto Rican students to 
engage in the electoral 
process. 



134 The Talon 




AU Republicans for 
Choice 

This group works to 
guarantee a woman's right 
to a safe, legal abortion 
and to promote this 
viewpoint within the 
Republican Party. 

Sound Shadows 

Sound Shadows in a 
unified group of poetry 
appreciators. This 
members recite poetry, 
original pieces or favorites 
from established poets in 
order to promote poetry 
appreciation at AU. 

ECOSENSE 

This group is working to 
educate AU and transform 
its student body into an 
environmentally aware 
group who will work to 
make this university 
environmentally sound. 



Supportive Students 
Against Sexual Assault 

Educating and informing 
students about the issues 
of sexual assault and its 
relevance to college 
campuses, this group 
offers its support to 
victims and its resources 
to the community at large. 

Varsity Quiz Bowl 

This organization was 
founded to promote 
academic competition. 

Young Americans for 
Freedom 

This groups works to 
instill conservative ideas 
and policies on the AU 
campus. 



Opposite: Members of TICA 
put on a fashion show in the 
Tavern. 

Above: Some of the members 
of Best Buddies at their 
annual ball. 



AU Students for Life 

These students work to 
increase campus 
awareness of pro-life 
issues and to protect the 
lives of the unborn. 



Organizations 135 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 



1893 - 1993 



Roster 




Men's Tennis 

Michael Brennan 

Peter Freeman 

Samir Karnik 

Lawrence Meltzer 

Cameron 
Montgomery 

Russell Oster 

Michael Papp 

Martin Enrique 
Petrella 

Guido Weinberg 

Head Coach: 

Helyn Edwards 

Assistant Coach: 

Kevin Quinn 



KINGS ci 8 



Although tennis 
was a sport that 
demanded physical 
strength and mental 
endurance from 
individual players, 
team support and 
unity were crucial as 
well. Individuals 
made the team 
strong, and with the 
help of Coach Helyn 
Edwards, fresh from 
the pro-circut, the 
team was able to 
mesh together and 
keep a positive 
attitude through 
both wins and 
losses. 

The team relied 
on the strengths of 
Guido Weinberg and 
Peter Freeman, who 



were considered 
most valuable play- 
ers by their fellow 
teammates, while 
new members like 
Larry "God" Meltzer 
and Martin Petrella 
improved their 
playing abilities. 

Helyn Edwards 
and the Assisstant 
Coach Kevin Quinn 
faced the fall season 
with little coaching 
experience between 
the two of them. 
Despite some sched- 
uling problems, the 
team's enthusiasm 
prevailed to lead 
them to a successful 
season. 

By the time 
spring rolled 



around, the team 
and Edwards were 
comfortable with 
each other. 

Senior Russell 
Oster said," Helyn 
Edwards was cer- 
tainly in full control 
of the program now 
that she had a year 
under her belt. The 
team responded to 
her well." 

The strength of 
individual players, 
the enthusiasm and 
unity of the team, 
and the encourage- 
ment of the coaching 
staff brought the AU 
men's tennis team a 
victorious year. 



• 




138 The Talon 




Opposite Lett: Tennis involved hand-eye coor- 
dination as well as quick steps (photo by Chris- 
tine Pockett). 

Opposite Ri^ht: The men's team emphasized 
the importance of doubles play (photo by Chris- 
tine Pockett). 

Left: No opponent could return Russell Oster's 
double-handed backhand stroke (photo by Chris- 
tine Pockett). 

Below Left: Part of the team took time off to 
smile for the camera (photo by Christine Pockett). 

Below: Michael Brennan executed his secret 
forehand shot (photo by Christine Pockett). 




Time Capsule 



if 






*> 



wr-- i vm**i ■ N ty^jH 



i"" v ^k,- 



The men's tennis team sported the n< west 
in athletic wear and used : I i< si of 
wooden rackets (photo courtesy of the 
A.U. Archives). 



Sports 139 



Right: No ball could escape Nicole Korn's reach 
(photo by Christine Pockett). 

Below Bottom: The athletes lined up to greet 
their opponents (photo by Christine Pockett). 

Below Top : A good game started with a powerful 
serve (photo by Christine Pockett 



*i* 




140 The Talon 



Roster 



For the 



LOVE 



of it 




The Lady Eagles' 
journey down their 
seasons included 
setbacks and achieve- 
ments. The 1992 Fall 
season was filled with 
player injuries. The 
season seemed prom- 
ising, especially with 
the return of the 
number one player, 
Cathy Bielskis from 
France. However, a 
back injury seriously 
inhibited her from 
seeing court time. 
Another setback 
arose. The next 
strongest player, 
senior Dana Stiller, 
suffered painful knee 
injuries. 

As the change of 
season manifested, so 
did a different air of 
circumstances. With 
a rigorous spring 
training session at the 
Hilton Head, the 
Lady Eagles returned 
healthy and started 
their Spring 1993 
season with a bang. 
Although they were 
not successful with 
their individual 
matches, the team 
was able to pull off 
their wins through 
their doubles 



matches. Head 
Coach Helyn 
Edwards and Assis- 
tant Coach Kevin 
Quinn emphasized 
to the team the 
doubles matches as 
an important aspect 
of the tennis game. 
This strategy really 
paid off. Trailing 4- 
2 in the singles, the 
tennis team arose 
victorious in their 
match-up against 
Towson State 
through their smart 
doubles play. 
Another memorable 
moment was their 
terrible upset win 
over Georgetown 
University, a first 
for AU since a four 
year interim. 

Senior Ashley 
Ehrhart accounted 
their success to the 
dedication of the 
teammates. "They 
really worked hard 
and hustled. They 
never gave up." she 
explained. 

Dana Stiller also 
agreed. "We all 
worked and stayed 
together. The 
players were ex- 
tremely helpful in 



contributing their 
support." 

Coaching also 
contributed to the 
team's overall suc- 
cess. It was their 
second year with 
Edwards and their 
first encounter with 
Assistant Coach 
Quinn. Both seniors 
believed the coach- 
ing team was very 
supportive. 

"Kevin Quinn 
was unlike any other 
assistant coach I've 
had here at AU." 
said Ehrhart. "He 
really emphasized 
the women's game, 
always encouraging 
us." 

Coach Edwards 
also taught her 
players many les- 
sons about competi- 
tion on and off the 
court. She stressed 
that performance on 
the tennis court 
translated into life, 
which was a series of 
competitions. Obvi- 
ously these lessons 
helped pull them 
through many victo- 
ries. 




Women's Tennis 

Cathy Bielskis 
Kelly Cooley 
Ashley Ehrhart 
Melissa Glass 
Nicole Korn 
Jodi Rausch 
Karen Scalley 
Nishita Shah 
Dana Stiller 
Margaret Walz 
Marianne Ward 

Head Coach: 

Helyn Edwards 

Asst. Coach: 

Kevin Quinn 



Sports 141 



Roster 



Men's 




Swimming and 




Diving 


Perched on the 


Matt Buls 


edge of the starting 


Free 


block, waiting for 


Roberto Coquis 
Fly 


the gun to sound, the 
last thing going 


Pat Fatta 


through a 


Diving 


swimmer's mind 


Martin Fayer 
Free 


was the crowd 
turnout or the name 


Robert Griffin 


of the swimmer next 


Breast 


to him. In those few 


Chris Hauth 


seconds when the 


Fly/IM 


swimmers took their 


Frederick Hviid 


mark and waited for 


IM 


the signal, the water, 


Neils Jensen 


only a body length 


IM/Free 


away, seemed un- 


Brian Mayberry 
Free 


reachable and fath- 
oms away. When 


Greg Meadows 


the gun fired, the 


IM/Free 


swimmers sprang 


Roger Navis 


from the block with 


Breast/IM 


something more akin 


Paul Nelson 


to instinct than to a 


Diving 


reaction to the sound 


Mike Nolan 


of the gun. Those 


Diving 


few milliseconds 


Benjamin Roy 


when the swimmer 


Free/Breast 


was suspended 


Steven Santanicola 


between solid 


Diving 


ground and the 


Gian Scozzaro 


water, he was aware 


IM 


of himself and his 


John Terzaken 


opponents gliding 


Free 


through the air. The 


Martin Urban 


first competitors to 


Breast/IM 


hit the water were a 




good indication of 


Head Coach: 

Doug Backlund 


who would claim 
victory in the race. 


Asst. Coaches: 

John Matson 


Once their bodies 


Jozsef Nagy 




Diving Coach: 




John Wolsh 





WAVES 



of 
Success 



broke the surface of 
the water, the 
adrenaline rushed 
through their bodies 
and everything fell 
into place. The 
rhythm of the water 
and their own 
breathing set into 
motion their power 
stroke, and nothing 
could deny them 
victory. In a sport 
that demanded 
personal discipline 
and physical 
stamina, team sup- 
port offered the 
mental endurance 
needed for indi- 
vidual sports. As a 
sign of team unity, 
the majority of the 
AU swimmers 
shaved their heads. 
This team unity gave 
them strength and 
confidence. 

The men's swim- 
ming team accepted 
a fourth place finish 
for the CAA Cham- 
pionships in Febru- 
ary. After taking the 
CAA Champion- 
ships in the '89-'90 
and the '90-'91 
seasons, the Eagles 
started the 92-93 
season in second 
place. With an 



mediocre season 
record of 5-5, the 
players themselves 
were far from me- 
diocre. 

The American 
swimmers knew 
what they wanted 
and did not hesitate 
to take a firm hold 
on victory. Chris 
Hauth, who received 
support from his 
fellow teammates 
throughout the 
season, was voted 
Performer of the 
Meet at the CAA 
Championships. He 
also won the 500 
Freestyle, 400 Indi- 
vidual Medley, and 
the 200 IM. Fredrick 
Hviid showed his 
own determination 
to win when he 
seized first place in 
the 200 Freestyle and 
the 1650 Freestyle. 

Individual suc- 
cess did not over- 
shadow the other 
nine team members 
who qualified for 
Easterns. The swim 
team was strength- 
ened by solid, con- 
sistent swimmers 
like new members 
Robbie Griffin and 
Niels Jensen, and 



veterans like Steve 
Santicola, Pat Fatta, 
and Paul Nelson. 
Coaching a swim 
team involved more 
than recording times 
and folding towels. 
There was a tight 
bond between coach 
and athlete, whose 
main competitors 
were the clock and 
his own ability. 
Head Coach Doug 
Blackland not only 
advised and encour- 
aged his swimmers, 
he pushed them to 
be their absolute 
best. He played the 
devil's advocate and 
personified a 
swimmer's main 
opponent, time. A 
swimmer needed 
physical endurance 
and mental stamina 
to withstand the 
pressures of a race. 

With the support 
of a close knit team 
like the AU Eagles 
and a dedicated 
coach like Doug 
Blackland, a swim- 
mer performed to 
the best of his ability. 



142 The Talon 




Left: Niels Jensen's confidence showed through 
as lie performed his backstroke (i >1 1< )t< > 1 >y Tyler 
Mallory). 

Below Top: Swimmers sport their new hair- 
styles before a competition (photo courtesy of 
Roberto Coquis). 

Below Bottom: Head Coach Doug Backlund 
was a motivating force to the swimming and 
diving teams (photo by Alex Tehrani). 



Mi 




Sports 143 







Women's 
Swimming and 
Diving 

Julie Andreef 
Free/Breast 

Sophia Barrowman 
Breast/IM 

Dawn Crosby 
Free 

Gabriella Csepe 
Breast/IM 

Jessica Decker 
Free 

Christine DiBlasi 
Breast 

Ann Marie Fick 
Breast/Free 

Hillary Gates 
Diver 

Wendy Gilmer 
Back 

Anjie Hjelle 
Free/Fly 

Rhonda Hughlett 
Diving 

Sabine Lawler 
Back/IM 

Michele Mondini 
Diving 

Jeannine Sirey 
IM/Breast/Free 

Sue Turner 
Free/I M 

Lara Weber 
Breast/IM 

Genna Weiss 
Diving 

Kristen Wiacek 
Free 

Jacque Wisnauskas 
Fly/I M 

Head Coach: 

Doug Backlund 




$X ?* T VH M 




Asst. Coaches 

John Matson 
Jozsef Nagy 

Diving Coach: 

John Wolsh 



144 The Talon 



In 
the 



SWIM 



It was another 
amazing winter 
season for the 
women's swimming 
and diving teams. 
Head Coach Doug 
Backlund returned 
for his fifth season 
to lead the Lady 
Eagles to another 
tremendous second 
place finish in the 
CAA Champion- 
ships in February. 
During his few 
years at AU, three 
athletes have been 
named CAA Out- 
standing Swimmer 
or Diver. 

It was a favor- 
able season for the 
swimmers in their 
individual events at 
the CAA Champi- 
onships. Sopho- 
more Gabriella 
Csepe returned 
following a trip to 
the 1992 Olympic 
Games in Barcelona, 
Spain, to leave her 
fellow competitors 
in the dust in the 
500 Freestyle, 200 
Breaststroke and 
100 Breaststroke 
events. Fellow 
teammate Ann 
Marie Flick won the 
50 Freestyle event. 
Jeannine Sirey also 
won the 200 and 400 
Individual Medley 



events. Senior co- 
captains Jeannine 
Sirey and Sabine 
Lawler also brought 
experience to the 
team in their spe- 
cialties of back- 
stroke and Indi- 
vidual Medley. A 
memorable moment 
for Sirey was cap- 
turing a new per- 
sonal record for the 
200-meter indi- 
vidual medley. 

The divers were 
equally skilled 
masters of their 
trade. Since they 
earned double 
points in their 
events, the divers 
were very impor- 
tant in securing 
AU's second place. 
Junior Genna Weiss 
won the one and 
three meter diving 
events. Her perfor- 
mances no doubt 
earned her the title 
of Diver of the Year, 
her second consecu- 
tive award. 

At the Eastern- 
ers at Buffalo Uni- 
versity, ten women 
qualified for the 
competition. They 
were the following: 
Sirey, Csepe, Fick, 
Lawler, Anjie Hjelle, 
Sophia Barrowman, 
Jacque Wisnauskas, 



Of 

Things 

and freshmen Chris- 
tine DiBlasi, Kristin 
Wiacek and Jessica 
Decker. 

The superb 
coaching by the staff 
of John Wolsh, John 
Matson, and Jozsef 
Nagy were respon- 
sible for the 
women's exceptional 
finish. Head Diving 
Coach Wolsh's 
incredible leadership 
had trained many 
athletes to become 
world and national 
team champions. 
Assistant Coach 
Matson applied his 
personal All- Ameri- 
can achievements in 
swimming to lead 
the Lady Eagles. 
Assistant Coach 
Jozsef Nagy was the 
inventor of the 
"wave" breaststroke, 
a technique used by 
many of the top- 
class swimmers. His 
coaching expertise, 
without question, 
contributed to the 
success of both 
women's teams. 

The seasons to 
come for the Ameri- 
can Lady Eagles 
swimming and 
diving teams looked 
promising. 



Opposite Left: Swimming entailed two practices 
a day to < >btainpeakc< »i i< in ioning (photo by Alicia 
Smith). 

Opposite Bottom Left: "< >ny< >ur starting blocks!" 
(photo by Alexi Tehrani). 

Opposite Bottom Right: AU took the anticipated 
lead in the backstroke event (photo by Tyler 
Mallory). 

Below: An AU swimmer got a good start oil the 
blocks (photo by Tyler Mallory). 




•^TJa 



Time Capsule 




The athletes of the defunct worn 

waterballet team were beatific 

of the water (photo courtesy of the 

Archives). 



Sports 145 



CLASS 




Being an athlete at The 
American University was not 
all fun and games as the ste- 
reotype went. He or she was 
considered first and foremost 
as a student and then an ath- 
lete, hence the term student- 
athlete. More was expected of 
student-athletes than normal 
undergraduate students. As 
the handbook from the Depart- 
ment of Athletics stated, "The 
student-athlete is expected to 
perform with excellence in the 
classroom as well as in his/her 
athletic endeavors." These 
special individuals dedicated 
as many hours to their sport as 
they do to attending classes. 
So, what was their secret to 
academic and athletic success? 

The role of student-athlete 
entailed much more than 
wearing a team uniform. He 
or she was required to meet 
the high standards of the 
NCAA as well as fulfill his/ 




her daily obligations to the 
school. These athletes were 
part of a unique group that 
were leaders in the classroom 
and on the playing field. 

The NCAA defined a stu- 
dent-athlete as an "individual 
who is expected to exhibit 
honesty and sportsmanship, 
and to represent both the 
individual academic institution 
and intercollegiate athletics as 
a whole with a sense of dignity 
and fair play." Not only did 
the athlete become a represen- 
tative of AU on the field, he or 
she was a representative of AU 
Athletics on campus. The 
student-athlete displayed the 
highest standards of integrity 
and competition. 

However, there had always 
been the stereotype of student- 
athletes as excessive party- 
goers. In fact, the actions of 
players, on and off the playing 
field, determined the image 







that they portrayed of other 
athletes. Here at AU, the 
Department of Athletics had 
launched substantial efforts to 
dissipate this myth of the 
"dumb jock." Equally, an 
extensive academic support 
program was implemented to 
ensure the academic success 
of the student-athletes. 

In addition to the NCAA 
academic standards, the 
scholar-athletes were expected 
to attend all classes while 
enrolled at the university. 
They did not receive favorable 
treatment because of their role 
as a varsity athlete. This 
would be abusing their honor- 
able title. 

It was not abnormal to see 
the student-athlete in the 
library studying. All new and 
transfer students were re- 
quired to attend the Academic 
Study Sessions for a total of 
ten hours per week. This was 




a well structured program to 
assist new student-athletes in 
adjusting to the transition 
from high school to college. 
So far, the program success- 
fully maintained the grades of 
the scholar-athletes. In Fall 
1992, the cumulative grade 
point average for athletes was 
2.91, with almost 50% of 
them maintaining a 3.0 GPA 
or higher, a tremendous feat, 
indeed. 

These athletes did not stop 
at just that. They felt a need 
to contribute to the better- 
ment of young people and 
others in the Washington, DC 
area. The organization 
American University Student- 
Athlete Volunteers Vital for 
Youth (AU-SAWY) was 
created in 1990 to satisfy their 
concerns. The student-ath- 
letes volunteered their time to 
help at various shelters, 
constructing homes, and to 




become a Big Brother/ Big 
Sister. The latter program 
entailed the most serious 
commitment from the athlete, 
requiring three hours every 
other Sunday. The student- 
athletes tried to build a strong 
bond with disadvantaged 
children or children whose 
parents were absent. As a role 
model, he or she represented a 
person who enjoyed sports but 
could continue his or her 
education. Also, the student- 
athletes influenced the kids to 
stay away from drugs and to 
stay in school. The image of 
the student-athlete generated a 
positive message and left a 
good impression on the chil- 
dren. They became optimistic 
about their future; they had 
hopes of continuing their 
studies and enjoying it 
through athletics. 

The experience was also 
memorable for the partici- 



pants. A smile on a child's 
face, the "thank you" from a 
homeless person at a soup 
kitchen — these were priceless 
signs of happiness from 
people in disadvantaged 
positions. Although many 
athletes' schedules were tight 
during the season, athletes 
who were out-of-season, and 
even some who were not, 
believed that the time they 
gave to others was some of the 
most rewarding time they 
spent. 

When the student-athlete 
reflected back on his or her 
time at The American Univer- 
sity, it was sure to be an 
incredible four years of aca- 
demic, scholastic, and athletic 
challenges. "Study hard, play 
with vigor, and stand proud at 
all times." The student-athlete 
was truly an exceptional 
individual. 



Opposite Right: The 
women gathered at 
half-time for regrouping 
with Coach Colleen 
Corwell (photo by 
Christine Pockett). 

Opposite Left: Mich- 
elle Kaplan battled for 
the ball against a 
George Mason player 
(photo by Jon 
Fulkerson). 

Below Right: Junior 
Alexa Shuman's love 
for soccer can be seen 
on her face (photo by 
Tyler Mallory). 

Below Left: The Lady 

Eagles worked best un- 
der pressure (photo by 
Christine Pockett). 

Right: Lead scorer Liz 
Pike battled for ball 
control (photo by Tyler 
Mallory). 





I 



¥ 




^. 




148 The Talon 




BATTLING 



for the 
Ball 



It was another 
rebuilding year as 
the Lady Eagles 
soccer team finished 
their Fall 1992 sea- 
son with a 6-12-1 
record. In its third 
year as a varsity 
sport, the sport and 
the players have 
matured tremen- 
dously. Their debut 
was successful as a 
team. They left a 
significant impres- 
sion against their 
CAA rivals. Equally, 
the team had many 
talented players. 

This fall, the 
women's team 
experienced a transi- 
tion. With their 
third new coach in 
three years, the 
players were able to 




3> 




smoothly adjust to 
the coaching tech- 
nique of Head Coach 
Colleen Corwell. 
Yet, this was not 
enough to pull the 
Lady Eagles to a 
winning season. 

As junior Christie 
Mc Intyre explains, 
the scores did not 
reflect their abilities. 

"We were able to 
give several highly 
ranked teams a run 
for their money." she 
explained. 

For instance, the 
team controlled most 
of the game against 
nationally ranked 
University of Vir- 
ginia, as they were 
tied for the first half 
and winning for a 
good part of the 



second. Unfortu- 
nately, they lost, 2-3. 

On a lighter note, 
junior Liz Pike was 
still able to perform 
at her personal best. 
She was voted MVP 
by her teammates 
and was recognized 
nationally as third 
place leader in the 
NCAA Central 
Region in scoring 
with 16 goals and 6 
assists. 

The Lady Eagles 
relied on the talents 
of their seniors, 
juniors, who make 
up the majority of 
their team, and their 
new players who 
were a major key in 
encouraging and 
supporting the team. 



I 




Roster 



Women's 
Soccer 

00 

Nicole Petallides 

1 

Christa Mclntyre 

3 

Michelle Kaplan 

4 

Kathleen Anderson 

5 

Liz Braham 

7 

Jennifer Janes 

8 

Alexa Shuman 

9 

Liz Pike 

10 

Kim Hodor 

11 

Kara Steele 

12 

Kelly Mumford 

13 

Kerry Fitzmaurice 

15 

Julia Pike 

16 

Eileen Mac Neill 

17 

Melissa Palma 

19 

Sam Schreiner 

20 

Elizabeth Santoro 

21 

Stephanie Kiger 

24 

Carli Ricciardi 

27 

Karin Dowling 

Head Coach: 

Colleen Corwell 

Asst. Coach: 

Steve Dry 



Sports 149 



Roster 



Men's Soccer 

8 

Jose Aservi 

25 

Dave Barbour 

14 

Chris Brown 

18 

Torry Colvin 

21 

Neil Davis 

26 

Adam Dodge 

3 

Mike Fay 

10 

Andrew Graham 

12 

Douglas Hammel 

15 

Tom Jasina 

2 

Scott Krosnowski 

13 

Erik Leibin 

4 

Dominic Lewis 

30 

Gregory Lyon 

5 

David Maly 

19 

Brendan O'Neill 

23 

Jamal Qaimmaqami 

22 

Diego Rebagliati 

7 

Marco Rodriguez 

9 

Jessie Skipwith 

6 

Aaron Tingle 

27 

Tim Keddie 

1 

Dave Urbach 

17 

Ron Viehweger 

24 

Josh Warmund 

16 

Jason-Craig Watson 

20 
Jonathan Day 

Head Coach: 

Bob Jenkins 

Asst. Coach: 

Jim Barlow 



DOMINATE 



the 
Field 



The buzz word for 
American University 
men's soccer was 
"new". First year 
Head Coach Bob 
Jenkins stepped on to 
the field supported by 
new Assistant Coach 
James Barlow. 

"This team has 
enormous potential 
and it could go some- 
where." they thought. 
With the loss of only 
two starters and a 
very talented group of 
athletes, the 1992 
soccer season wasn't 
as successful as 
Jenkins and Barlow 
had hoped. Instead of 
uncovering glittering 
treasures in the soccer 
treasure chest, they 
found diamonds in 
the rough. All they 
needed was to be 
polished and shaped, 
and placed in a beauti- 
ful setting. But even 
the finest jeweler in 
the world couldn't 
create an effect that 
wasn't possible. 



The 1992 season 
was a learning 
experience for the 
men's soccer team. 
Adjusting to new 
coaching tech- 
niques made things 
less predictable for 
the players. New 
Head Coach Bob 
Jenkins had six 
years of coaching 
under his belt, 
working first as a 
graduate assistant 
for three years for 
Coach Bruce Arena 
at UVA, and then 
as Assistant Coach 
from 1989 to 1992. 
Assistant Coach 
James Barlow held 
the position of 
Head Coach for 
one year at the 
Hun School in 
Princeton, New 
Jersey before 
coming to Ameri- 
can University. 

With new 
coaches, team 
unity relied heavily 
on returning vet- 



eran players like 
goalkeeper Dave 
Urbach, Diego 
Rebagliati, Aaron 
Tingle, Scott 
Krosnowski, senior 
Mike Fay, and Erik 
Leibin, who was the 
leading scorer in the 
'90 and '91 seasons. 
Undaunted by a 
challenging schedule, 
the Eagles pushed 
forward with confi- 
dence in their team 
morale and faith in 
their new coaches. 
Although they had a 
less than successful 
season, the team saw 
the fresh coaching 
techniques and the 
individuality of 
players mesh together 
at the end of the 
season. 





150 The Talon 






Opposite B< >it( )in Left: Jose Acervi manag< :d to 

gel the ball bef< >re the opponent (photo by Jon 

Fulkerson). 

Bottom Left: Aaron Tingle, Scoti Krosnowski, 

Diego Rebagliaii lined up to protect their goal 

(photo by Jon Fulkerson). 

Below: Jessie Skipwith went for the head bal 

(photo by Jon Fulkerson). 

Left: Deception and footwork were key to 

soccer (photo by Jon Fulkerson). 




The Reeves Field was on< e home to tin- 
Eagles Football Team! An At player tack- 
led a towi 1 rival pli iy< :r from < :< it! i< >lk l H >iver- 
sity (photo courtesy ot A.U. Archives). 



Sports 151 



Art 
in 



MOTION 



In its second year 
of competition, the 
women's varsity 
lacrosse team ex- 
ploded with a prom- 
ising debut. Many 
returning players 
and a wave of tal- 
ented freshmen 
gathered to form this 
year's lacrosse team, 
a sport considered 
the fastest game on 
two feet. While 
many players have 
been playing for 
more than five years, 
others only had a 
thrill for collegiate 
competition. 

Their optimism 
derived from the 
experienced coach- 
ing of Head Coach 
Anne Wilkinson, a 
former All-American 
player. Assistant 
Coach Patricia 
Kennedy had also 
many years of player 
and coaching experi- 
ence. 

A memorable 
moment was the pre- 
game season train- 
ing: three miles, 
rigorous drills, and 
scrimmages, comple- 
mented by circuit 
training afterward. 
Despite the pain and 
bitching, most 
agreed that it readily 
prepared them for 
the heavy competi- 
tion that followed. 

The transition 
from club sport to a 
competitive varsity 
team was turbulent 



at times. They so 
vividly remembered 
their first lesson of 
collegiate play at the 
William and Mary 
Invitational Tourna- 
ment. Good and 
talented as they 
were, they did not 
achieve what was 
expected. Disap- 
pointment flooded 
their hearts, as they 
succumbed to four 
consecutive losses. 

Other factors 
seemed to affect 
them at the begin- 
ning of our season. 
Spring's monsoons, 
foreign terrains, and 
temperamental 
Mother Nature 
cancelled their 
games or made them 
resort to turf fields at 
other universities. 
However,they led 
themselves to a 
decent start. 

Yet, a piece of the 
puzzle still didn't fit. 
The players were 
better than their 
opponents. Their 
goal was to win. 
Then what them? It 
was a matter of 
confidence in their 
teammates and 
willingness to play 
hard. Lacrosse was 
truly a mental game, 
as they could clearly 
see in practice and 
games. Some days 
they were hot, some 
days they weren't. 

There were some 
keys players respon- 



sible for keeping up 
the optimistism. 
Seniors Nicky 
Barrett, Ju Me Chon, 
and Kara Callaghan 
led the team with the 
help of talented 
juniors Denise 
Tenkinson, Sara 
Shapiro, Tracy 
North, and Michelle 
Kleiss to collectively 
form a core group in 
defense-offense 
transition. Liz 
Braman and Christa 
Frankos also made 
smashing debuts as 
first-year goalies. 
However, the team 
would not have 
improved as much 
as they did without 
the help of all play- 
ers. They all tried to 
motivate each other 
to reach personal 
limits. 




152 The Talon 





* 




Opposite Top: Goalie 
Liz Braman anticipated 
the placement of the 
shot (photo by Ju Me 
Chon). 

Opposite Bottom: 
Tracy North received 
advice from Sara 
Shapiro (photo by Ju 
Me Chon). 

Above: Nicky Barret 
ready to check a 
Rutgers player (photo 
by Jon Fulkerson). 

Left: Margo Faiman, 
Stacy Stets, and JuMe 
chon paused for a 
photo after their win 
over Hofstra (photo by 
Ju Me Chon). 



Roster 



LACROSSE 

GK 

Liz Braman 

GK 

Christa Frankos 

1 

Stacy Stets 

7 

Margo Faiman 

10 

Jenny Gray 

11 

Kristin Frieswyk 

12 

Holly Lerner 

14 

Denise Jenkinson 

15 

Amanda Willett 

18 

Heather Murray 

21 

Nicole Barrett 

22 

Michelle Kleiss 

23 

Kelly Crossman 

24 

Ju Me Chon 

26 

Sarah Shapiro 

27 

Tracy North 

29 

Donna Drewyer 

Head Coach: 

Anne Wilkinson 

Asst. Coach: 

Patricia Kennedy 



Sports 153 



Roster 



Field Hockey 

00 

Michelle Kleiss 

00 

Dana Farengo 

1 

Stacy Stets 



Lisa Carey 



Karen McFerson 

10 

Kristine Sudano 

11 

Kristen Frieswyk 

12 

Abigail Stock 

13 

Rachel Schwolow 

14 

Denise Jenkinson 

15 

Jennifer Blodgett 

16 

Abir Muhaisen 

17 

Heather Bates 

19 

Erin Ward 

21 

Nicole Barrett 

22 

Diane Lewis 

23 

Kelly Crossman 

24 

Ju Me Chon 

25 

Michelle Corace 

27 

Tracy North 

30 

Sara Shapiro 

Head Coach: 

Anne Wilkinson 

Asst. Coaches: 

Patricia Kennedy 
Jon O'Haire 



STICK 



to it 



If the 1992 Fall 
season for the Lady 
Eagles was a roller 
coaster ride, then 
the players all raced 
up to get a seat on 
the amusement ride 
of their lives. Natu- 
rally, these 
athletes did not 
hestitate taking 
over the first seats 
of the ride to what 
seemed like a 
comfortable ride to 
success. Extensive 
training for victory 
had no effect in 
hindering the 
team's goal. Their 
ride to victory was 
filled with many 
loopholes and 
unexpected chal- 
lenges, but there 
were also antici- 
pated curves of 
impeccable perfor- 
mance. They felt a 
surge of energy 
from meeting the 
challenges. Yet, 
expectations were 
sometimes difficult 
to fulfill. 

Coach Anne 
Wilkinson and her 
coaching team of 
Patricia Kennedy 
and Jon O' Haire 
were aware of the 
potential that the 
Lady Eagles pos- 
sessed. This energy 



was apparent after 
their explosive debut 
against the nation's 
third-seeded team, 
the University of 
Maryland. Despite 
their 1-0 double 
overtime loss, AU 
sustained their posi- 
tion in this scrabble 
for the ride to victory. 

Along the way, 
challenges were met 
and challenges were 
whole-heartedly 
overcome. The Lady 
Eagles went on to win 
several matches but 
were periodically 
discouraged through 
the twists and turns 
of the voyage and 
often relinquished 
their reign to other 
teams. 

It wasn't like the 
team didn't want to 
win. On the contrary, 
they knew what they 
wanted and reached 
to obtain it. Team- 
work clicked at cer- 
tain times, but many 
external factors may 
have affected the 
team's overall com- 
petitive edge. A few 
weeks into the season, 
nearly half the team 
experienced injuries: 
former Canadian 
National Team goalie 
Michelle Kleiss tried 
to overcome back 



problems while 
talented freshman 
Stacey Stetz waited 
patiently until her 
fingers healed; high- 
scoring junior Tracy 
North experienced a 
facial injury and 
others received 
treatment for 
strained leg muscles. 

Nonetheless, 
these minor setbacks 
didn't dampen the 
Lady Eagles' spirits. 
Under the leadership 
of the three seniors 
— Nicki Barrett, 
Krissy Sudano, and 
Ju Me Chon — and 
several experienced 
junior players, the 
team gained an 
important foothold 
in matches against 
Drexel and Bucknell. 

So how did this 
rollercoaster ride 
end? Full of unex- 
pected turns and 
adrenaline-pumping 
ascents. When the 
ride was finally over, 
the Lady Eagles 
came off with smil- 
ing faces. They 
survived this time, 
but they were get- 
ting ready for an- 
other victorious 
return to the ride of 
their lives. 



154 The Talon 



Left: Petite but nimble I leather Bates attempted 
to dodge her opponent (photo by Tyler Mallory). 

Far Bottom: Denise Jenkinson consoled Tracy 
North as the trainer cleaned her injury (photo by 
Jon Fulkerson). 

Middle: Junior Heather Bates drove the ball out 
of the defensive end (photo by Ju Me Chon). 

Below: The athletes recognized the announcing 
of their opponents (photo courtesy of Denise 
Jenkinson). 




Sports 155 




Men's Basket- 
ball 

22 

Brian Gilgeous 

3 

Erick Lawrence 

11 

Darryl Franklin 

15 

Todd Robinson 

20 

Michael Blackwell 

23 

Tim Fudd 

32 

Bryan Palmer 

34 

Duane Gilliam 

42 

Paul Washington 

45 

Marko Krivokapic 

50 

Craig Sedmak 

Head Coach: 

Chris Knoche 

Asst. Coaches: 

Gordon Austin 
Darrell Brooks 
Bruce Kelley 



Up for 



GRABS 



The Winter Issue 
of Common Sense, the 
official newsletter of 
the American Revo- 
lution, noted that 
the "offensive fire- 
power should not be 
a problem for the 
1992-93 year" for the 
men's basketball 
team, led for a third- 
year by Head Coach 
Chris Knoche. How- 
ever, the exceptional 
leadership team of 
seniors Brian 
Gilgeous and Craig 
Sedmak were not 
enough to fuel the 
Eagles to a winning 
season. 

This season was 
truly the year led by 
the seniors of the 
team. Brian 
Gilgeous and Craig 
Sedmak both 
achieved numerous 
individual honors. 
Both were named 
Colonial Athletic 
Association (CAA) 



Players of the Week. 
Gilgeous' excellent 
skills earned him 
the honor of 1993 
Player of the Year. 
He was also the 
Eagles' main scoring 
threat, achieving a 
career high of 40 
points in a game 
against Mount Saint 
Mary's. Sedmak 
was equally honored 
when he was noted 
in the 1993 edition of 
Inside Sports maga- 
zine on the Student 
Athlete Team. 
Noted as a versatile, 
strong player, 
Sedmak was a threat 
to his opponents. 
He was dangerous 
under the basket and 
three-point range. 
His performance 
undoubtedly earned 
him honors on the 
Second Team All- 
CAA team. 

The Eagles 
struggled in the 



beginning of their 
season, tallying only 
two wins of their 
first eight games. As 
CAA competition 
progressed, they got 
into winning mode. 
The team finished 
fourth in the CAA 
Tournament Cham- 
pionships, losing to 
conference leader 
James Madison 
University by a mere 
four points. 

The Eagles ended 
their season at the 
CAA Tournnament 
called Super Hoops 
IV. They advanced 
to the semi-finals 
until another con- 
frontation with JMU 
ended the Eagles' 
reign in a very close 
game of 61-70. Their 
overall record for the 
season was 11-17, 
with a conference 
record of 7-9. 












156 The Talon 




Opp< >site l.owcr Left: Point guard Darryl Franklin 
passed his opponents to go in for the shot (photo 
provided by The Eagle). 

Left: CAA Player of the Year Brian Gigeous 
faked out a Maryland player (photo by Jon 
Fulkerson). 

Below: Slam dunk in front of an AU crowd in 
Bender (photo by Tyler Mallory). 




Time Capsule 




AU's basketball team sported converse- 
like shoes and body revealing uniforms. 
The knee pads complimented the look 
(photo courtesy of A.U. Archives). 



Sports 157 




Women's Bas- 
ketball 

10 

Beth Dorfmeister 

12 

Amy Dorfmeister 

13 

Tiffany Turner 

15 

Kim Connell 

23 

Kris Willnecker 

24 

Bernadette Fagan 

25 

Kirsten Keller 

32 

Jeri Dorezas 

33 

Allyson Baker 

35 

Becky Greenfield 

43 

Karen Jenkins 

44 

Gail Wilkins 

45 

Kristin Hirschler 

50 

Kris Josefoski 

52 

Carolyn Hufnagel 

Head Coach: 

Jeff Thatcher 

Asst. Coach: 

Kim Colyer 

Grad. Asst.: 

Temica 
Curenton 



Reaching New 

HEIGHTS 



The Winter 1992- 
93 season was gener- 
ous to the women's 
basketball team. 
They finished with 
an overall winning 
record of 15-13, with 
the coach and team 
members obtaining 
numerous regional 
achievements. For 
Head Coach Jeff 
Thatcher, he gar- 
nered a league-high 
of six CAA awards. 
He also led the Lady 
Eagles to the second 
round of CAAs, a 
first in five vears. 



Coach Thatcher 
was not the only one 
to be recognized. 
Two seniors were 
spolighted. Karen 
Jenkins was honored 
on the All-CAA 
team, her second 
consecutive title. In 
addition, she re- 
corded 84 steals in 
one season, breaking 
a university record. 
She was noted as the 
most versatile 
player. Also, noted 
for her leadership on 
and off the court, 
senior Kris Josefoski 



was honored her 
second time on the 
All-CAA Academic 
Team. 

These players are 
only a few of the 
talented members on 
the team. Freshman 
Gail Wilkins made a 
explosive debut, 
leading in freshman 
scoring points (471). 
Overall, the support 
of the teammates 
helped the Lady 
Eagles to end with a 
strong finish. 








158 The Talon 




Opposite Left: Number 45 Kristin Hirschler t< >< >k 
tlie ball back into the center of the court (photo 
by Tyler Mallory). 

Left: All l )efensive Team Karen Jenkins went for 
il u • three pointer (photo courtesy of The Eagle). 

Bottom Right: Bernadette Fagan intercepted her 
opponent's pass (photo by Jon Fulkerson). 

Below: Taking the layup was a piece of cake for 
Becky Greenfield (photo by Jon Fulkerson). 





Sports 159 



Opposite Bottom Right: I lead Coach Goldberg 
advised his players: "When the ball is about to 
come to our side, jump very high" (photo by Jon 
Fulkerson). 

Right: Andriana Ysern and Kristi Schott sus- 
pended in the air for the block (photo by Jon 
Fulkerson). 

Far Bottom: AU dominated the game against 
their opponents, slamming one dig after another 
(photo from The Talon Files) 

Below: No dig is a problem for Kristi Schott and 
her team (photo by Jon Fulkerson). 




160 The Talon 





Roster 






t 




Aim 



HIGH 



The American 
University women's 
volleyball team 
finished the 1992 
season with a 21-15 
overall record. This 
season marked the 
fourth straight time 
in Barry Goldberg's 
four-year coaching 
stint at American 
that the Eagles won 
21 or more matches. 
American jumped off 
to a hot start, win- 
ning their first nine 
matches before 
dropping to the top 
ranked University of 
Pittsburgh. As a 
team, the Eagles did 
very well in tourna- 
ments, such as the 
University of Mary- 
land Eastern Shore 
Classic in October. 

Individually, two 
Eagles' players 
earned the Colonial 



+ *!** 



Athletic Association 
(CAA) Player of the 
Week honors. 
During the first 
week of the season, 
Jennifer Klutznick, a 
sophomore from 
Boulder, Colorado, 
helped the Eagles 
get off to a great 
start sweeping the 
LaSalle Invitational 
Tournament held in 
September. Later in 
the season, junior 
Natasha Sylvian 
from Port-au- 
Prince, Haiti, se- 
cured MVP honors 
at the UMES Classic 
and was honored 
for her exceptional 
play as CAA Player 
of the Week and 
then was named to 
the All-CAA Team. 

The team re- 
ceived great help 
from strong players 



like junior Yvie 
Fabella. She was 
first in the CAA in 
serves aces. In 
addition, team mem- 
ber Jennifer 
Giordano, a junior 
from Shelburne, 
New York, ranked 
fifth in the CAA with 
a 3.34 dig average. 

Head Coach 
Barry Goldberg also 
saw great individual 
efforts from sopho- 
mores Aleida 
Arbona and Melissa 
Warrimer whose 
playing skills im- 
proved throughout 
the season. The team 
was also strength- 
ened by new fresh- 
men and transfer 
students. The play- 
ers all made tremen- 
dous efforts to im- 
prove their level of 
performance. 







'»lJ$ 







Volleyball 

11 

Brigitte Anders- 
Kraus 

3 

Aleida Arbona 

9 

Yvie Fabella 

4 

Jennifer Giordano 

15 
Sherita Hall 

5 

Shannon Jaax 

13 

Jennifer Klutznick 

2 

Alyson Kreb- 
Degang 

8 

Tiffany Libeu 

14 

Kristi Schott 

10 

Natasha Sylvian 

12 

Melissa Warriner 

7 

Adriana Ysern 

Head Coach: 

Barry Goldberg 

Asst. Coaches: 

Kevin Kirk 
Theresa Flynn 



Sports 161 



Double 

It wasn't every- 
day you came 
upon an AU 
player. They were 
a unique breed. 
They didn't boast. 
"Hello, I am on the 
rugby team. Do 
you want to see my 
dislocated shoul- 
der?" 

They weren't 
exhibitionists on 
campus. At times, 
a rugby player 
would proudly 
sport his jacket, all 
spotted with marks 
of his accomplish- 
ments. ("That 
spot? No big deal. 
Oh, I only tackled 
this guy and he 
busted his cheek 
when he fell.") 
Yet, they didn't 
brag; and they 
certainly never 
asked for false 
praise. They didn't 
have any other 
ulterior motives in 
playing the game. 
Rugby players 
participated be- 



I M PACT 






cause they loved the 
sport. So what set 
them apart from all 
of us? We asked 
one of our local 
experts, J. Martin 
Tansey. 

"The American 
University Rugby 
Football club has 
enjoyed a strong 
tradition of over a 
quarter of a century 
of competitive play. 
In the 1992-93 sea- 
son, AU played 
matches against 
tough local rivals 
such as U.S. Naval 
Academy, George 
Washington, Catho- 
lic Univeristy, and 
St. Mary's. The 
spring season was 
highlighted by the 
team's pariticpation 
in the presitigous 
Cherry Blossom 
Tournament, held 
on the National Mall 
every April. The 
AU ruggers faired 
well in one of the 
East Coast's tough- 
est contests. 



"The men of AU 
were a rare breed on 
and off the pitch. 
Well known for their 
high spirits and hard 
play, the rugby team 
earned its reputation 
as a bastion of school 
spirit, giving their all 
for our consistently 
large crowds, and 
afterwards hosting 
celebrations that will 
long be remembered. 

"Coaching was 
led by Jack Howe, a 
veteran of interna- 
tional play, to whom 
we owed great 
thanks for his dili- 
gence and sacrifice. 
Assistant Coaches 
Jeff Goodman and 
Ian Smith also 
helped a great deal 
with the team. 

"Although 1993 
graduated five 
seniors, next year 
looked just as prom- 
ising." 




,#r 



162 The Talon 



Opposite Bottom: AU Rugby faced competition 
against Army at the annual Cherry Blossom 
Tournament (photo by Ju Me Chon). 

Left: This sport required agility and endurance, 
and a little help from your friends (photo by Ju Me 
Chon). 

Bottom: The ruggers lined up to fight for the ball 
(photo by Ju Me Chon). 

Below: The players gathered to talk strategy as 
< >thers provided water (photo by Ju Me Chon). 




Body contact wasn't too much ol n in lpor- 
tant issue for the AU football ti im These 

Eagles wore loose fitting pants with mini- 
mum body padding, (photo courtesy of A.U. 
Archives). 



Sports 163 



Right: Rick Lawlor 
ready to pin his oppo- 
nent (photo courtesy of 
The Eagle). 

Below: Sophomore 
Jake Scott specialized 
in the 190 lb. event 
(photo courtesy of 
Mahlon Chase). 




Above: Senior Rob Hjerling won the most| 
< n itstai h iii ig Wr( sstler Award at the CAA Champi- 
onship and went on to the NCAA Tournament u 
(photo courtesy of The Eagle) 



164 The Talon 




DOWN 



Roster 



for the Count 




This season, the 
wrestling team 
seemed to experi- 
ence a restructuring 
of all aspects. First, 
they greeted new 
Head Coach Brian 
Shaffer and his 
assistant John 
Morris. Then, the 
returning players 
introduced them- 
selves to four new, 
promising wrestlers. 
As the season pro- 
gressed, so did their 
will to win with a 
new approach. 

The challenges 
for Coach Shaffer 
seemed numerous. 
He would be coach- 
ing a team that had 
come out of a losing 
season. The team 
was very young and 
had not yet built the 
collective team 
confidence crucial 




\bovr: Mahlon Chase's opponent looked like 
he was in pain, as he tried to escape Chase's 
in >\vs (| >hoto courtesy of The Eagle). 



for a successful 
record. Frustration 
and patience were, 
no doubt, going to 
be major compo- 
nents. 

The team went 
strong and ended 
the last segment of 
their season riding a 
high wave of victory, 
winning pivotal 
meets against Wil- 
liam and Mary, Old 
Dominion, James 
Madison, and 
Shippensburg. 
Coach Shaffer al- 
ways thought posi- 
tively and stressed 
the team's potential. 
The wrestlers finally 
recognized their 
potential and used 
their collective 
energy to fuel their 
individual victories 
against their oppo- 
nents. 

The wrestling 
team also faired 
tremendously well 
in tournaments, 
making a permanent 
imprint in the Colo- 
nial Conference as a 
powerful force. For 
instance, in the Old 
Dominion Invita- 
tional Tournament 
in November, they 
won third place in 
addition to numer- 
ous individual 
placements. Senior 
Mahlon Chase 
earned first place 
while colleague 
Jacob Scott received 



the same honors. 
Sophomore team- 
mate Jeff Bunker also 
won first place in the 
heavyweight divi- 
sion. 

The team's suc- 
cess was due not 
only to the experi- 
enced coaching of 
Shaffer and Morris, 
but to the encour- 
agement of the 
wrestlers them- 
selves. Senior cap- 
tains Mahlon Chase 
and Rob Hjerling set 
positive examples 
for their team mem- 
bers as qualified 
players of the team. 
A key element was 
that the team was 
more relaxed and 
wrestled with more 
confidence. They 
expected to win and 
accomplished this 
feat. 

The Eagles held 
on to this spirit to 
crush CAA oppo- 
nent James Madison 
in front of an enthu- 
siastic crowd on 
Spirit Night at 
Bender Arena. 

One unique 
feature of the AU 
wrestling team was 
their comradeship 
on and off the mat. 
If the team believes 
in their members, 
then the individuals 
have belief in them- 
selves. This team 
sure gave their 100% 
in everything. 



Wrestling 

150/158 lbs. 
Brian Baskinger 

Hwt. 

Jeff Bunker 

142 lbs. 
Mahlon Chase 

118/126 lbs. 
Frank Dickenson 

118 lbs. 

Dan Di Niclola 

118 lbs. 
Justin Di Nicola 

158 lbs. 
Todd Florence 

134 lbs. 

John Hernandez 

118 lbs. 
Mynor Herrera 

158/167 lbs. 
Rob Hjerling 

142 lbs. 
Chris Hurlburt 

150/158 lbs. 
Bill Ives 

134 lbs. 
George Janes 

126/134 lbs. 
Brandon Lang 

167/177 lbs. 
Rick Lawlor 

126/134 lbs. 
Chris Lombardy 

Hwt. 

Boris Populoh 

190 lbs. 
Jake Scott 

177 lbs. 
Jon Speck 

118/126 lbs. 
Chris Vacek 

Head Coach: 

Brian Shaffer 

Asst. Coach: 

John Morris 



Sports 165 



Still on 

TOP 



What are Cheerleaders? 

What are cheerleaders? They are certainly more 
Than a quick chant and smile, and a yell from the floor. 

They're the final result of long hours of sweat, 
And just a few tears of frustation; and yet, 

They're special; they know that in front of that crowd, 
So much is expected to make them all proud. 

Though sometimes the pressure seems too much to take, 
They come back with style and a love you can't fake. 

They're pom-pons and Reeboks, always clean, shiny white, 
They're warmth and a shoulder, when things don't go right. 

They're true friends to many, and favorites of all 
They're tumbling and dancing, and learning to fall. 

They're the memories held fast by those who've grown old, 
People to worship by little ones; told, 

You practice and someday you can cheer too! 
And wear your school colors, you'll know what to do. 

'Cause they are your heroes, they're some of the best. 
They've countered the odds and passed all the tests. 

So what are cheerleaders? They're certainly more 
Than a quick chant and smile and a yell from the floor. 








166 The Talon 




Left: Half-time entertainment provided by the 
cheerleading squad (photo by Ju Me Chon). 

Below: The crowds at Bender Arena always 
looked forward to their favorite mascot Clawed 
(photo by Ju Me Chon). 





X* 



Sports 167 



CLOSER 



look 




RUGBY: 

"Rugby was the most 
challenging sport I've 
ever played. It com- 
bined the physical con- 
tact of football with the 
speed, endurance, and 

anticipation of soccer." 
- J Martin Tansey 




14 



' - 



MEN'S SOCCER: 



"The first year with a 

new coach required an 

adaptation process. So, 

the losing season record 

was pretty much because 

there were new coaches 

and a different style of 

coaching. It was a fun 

season, though. We won 

two tournaments, the 

AU Classic and the 

Patriots Invitational at 

George Mason." 
- Diego Rebagliati 




WOMEN'S SOCCER: 

"We've had our share 

of coaches — three in our 

three years as a team — 

although (Head Coach) 

Collene Corwell was an 

easy adjustment. Also, 

there were other minor 

setbacks. We had a 

small budget which 

restricted travel and 

recruiting." 
- Christa Mc Intvre 




FIELD HOCKEY: 

"We were emotional 
in each game. We had 
confidence in our skills 
and working as a unit. 
But we just lost it men- 
tally. Nonetheless, 
overcoming additional 
factors, we proved to be 

successful." 

- Head Coach Anne 

Wilkinson 



168 The Talon 




WRESTLING: 

"The highlight of 
my season was when I 
placed third as an East 
Regional national quali- 
fier. I was so ecstatic to 
pin my opponent that I 
jumped up and through 

my hands in the air!" 
Mahlon Chase 




TENNIS: 

"My memorable moment 

was the fighting attitude 

I had each time I walked 

on the court, performing 

with an injury. It was a 

mental battle in which I 

feel I was victorious. " 
- Dana Stiller 




^ T ..„.iH' : 



SWIMMING: 

"One of the strengths of 
the men's team came 
about at the end of the 
season; it was unity. As 
one can see, the majority 
of the team went hair- 
less." 
- Roberto Coquis 




VOLLEYBALL: 

"Our coach, Barry 
Goldberg, has brought 
the team a long way in 
just the three years I 
have been here. We 
were able to go to the 
conference finals against 
William and Mary. Even 
though we did not win, 
it was still a great accom- 
plishment." 
- Jennifer Giordano 



Sports 169 




AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 



1893 - 1993 



Rachel Y Abaqueta 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Jason A Abend 
BA CLEG 

Alexandra H Abraham 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Chitra Acharya 
BA ECONOMICS 

Eleanor S Ackley 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Nicole A Aiello 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Liza Akhnoukh 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Nasser B Al-Shamsi 
BS COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Mary Jane Albanese 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Christine M Albee 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Lisa M Alberico 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Tracey M Albert 
BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 




172 The Talon 




Susan M Albrecht 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Lauren M AJperin 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 

Joy S Akhouse 
BA LITERATURE 



Anthony R Alviani Ji 
BA CLEG 

Maria E Argomaniz 
BSBA MARKETING 

Hilde Arnestad 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Laura A Ashley 

BA COMMUNICATION 

Angela Aslami 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

James Aversano 

BA ECONOMIC THEORY 



Fathiya S Baabde 
BS CHEMISTRY 

Lynn Bagorazzi 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Khadija Bahous 



Academia 173 



Ahmed S Bakhashab 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

ReneeJ Ballard 
BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Tracey Barbour 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Andrew M Barletta 
BA HISTORY 

Stephanie D Barney 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

David A Baron 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Erica Bashour 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Suzanne Bass 
BA INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Sarah Bealmear 
BA DESIGN 



Roger K Beard 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Matthew Beauchemin 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 

Andrew E Becker 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 




tWl* 



174 The Talon 




I* J ! miM m 



Mark D Begansky 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Elisabeth F Behar 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

Michael Berman 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 



Lisa Bethel 
BA SOCIOLOGY 

Richard L Billiet 
BSBA FINANCE 

Michelle A Birch 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Hylah E Birenbaum 
BSBA FINANCE 

Ann Bittinger 
BA SOCIOLOGY 

Stacey L Blackman 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Juliet M Blair 
BA HISTORY 

Jonathan Block 
BA JUSTICE 

Barry Blumenfeld 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 



Academia 175 



Clelia L Bonilla 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Phyllis Boorshtein 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Heidi L Boorstein 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Kara Borsdan 



Kristin T Boryczka 
BA HISTORY 

Kaylie Bowers 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Tina M Bowler 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

Leslie A Bozeman 

BA FOREIGN LANGUAGE & 

COMMUNICATION MEDIA 

Mary B Bradley 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Elizabeth Braham 
BA JUSTICE 

Robin Bresenhan 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Amy L Bressi 
BA LITERATURE 




176 The Talon 




Maria del Carmen Briz 
BA DESIGN 

Rose G Broadwater 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 

David E Brody 
BSBA MARKETING 



Pierre Brogan 



Berret A Brooker 

BA FOREIGN LANGUAGE & 

COMMUNICATION MEDIA 

Khaled A Buhaji 

BS COMPUTER INFORMATION 

SYSTEMS 



Diana C Burns 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Lori Bush 



Deborah J Bylenok 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Christine L Cahill 

BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Mary K Call 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Deborah L Campbell 
BA ART HISTORY 



Academia 177 



Andrew C Carey 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 

Diane F Carroll 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 

Rebecca Case 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Mary C Cassidy 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Katania O Castaneda 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Allison Cendali 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Michele M Certo 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Cindy B Cesare 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Amy I Chandler 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Kimberley Charros 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Emerson I Chen 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Cameron E Chesebrough 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 




178 The Talon 




u 



People at AU 

want to give to 

others... .in a 

sense to serve 

others, to be a 

facilitator so 

that dreams 

can be real- 

ized. 



yy 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Dean Betty Bennett 



I 



'm tempted to say that my inter- 
view with Dean Betty Bennett 
was one of my favorites. Prior to 
the interview. I sat in her office 
while she conversed with her agent 
in Italy who is planning on translat- 
ing and publishing a speech she 
gave. This alone was fascinating, 
and the interview was as well. 

Betty Bennett's mind was first 
opened to the idea of imagination 
during her childhood growing up at 
Coney Island. She stuck with New 
York City, obtaining her bachelor's 
degree from Brooklyn College and 
her Master's at N.Y.U.. As a matter 
of fact, she remained in New York 
City until only eight years ago when 
she came to join us here in Washing- 
ton. Her crowing achievement, it 
seems, is her reknown as the world's 
finest authority on Mary Shelley, 
which she proves with her three- 
volume definitive edition of the 
letters of the romantic author. 
"Mary Shelley has given me a mar- 
velous education. She knew so 
much and in figuring out what she 
knew. ..she taught me an awful lot." 

When Dean Bennett isn't 
deaning she still engages in 
academia, "It's more a form of 
detective work. So some of the 
things I like to do are to go to re- 
search libraries and do that kind of 
work. I also wake up very early in 
order to write every day." 

Regarding academia, I was still 
curious as to why Dean Bennett left 
her life-long home of New York to 
come to The American University. 
"I decided to look around, and then 
I wanted to find a University that 
would in itself be an exciting place 



and that would be interested in 
bringing someone in who had a 
leaning towards doing things.... more 

activist than play It seemed to me 

that of the places I was interviewing, 
this was the best fit." 

I asked Dean Bennett what her 
favorite part of American University 
was? She was quick to respond, 
"The energy of the place. The en- 
ergy and commitment on the part of 
the faculty and the students. I think 
its unusual of AU in that way. ...I've 
been to many different universities... 
and we work very hard to come 
together and understand how our 
programs merge and mesh and 
relate to each other. And in turn we 
want to do that with the entire 
campus. Students at AU are very 
smart, and they are interested in 
using their smarts in more extended 
ways." 

"People at AU want to give to 
others.... in a sense to serve others, to 
be a facilitator so that dreams can be 
realized." 

Dean Bennett had a very ani- 
mated personality, which made her 
a great person to talk to. When she 
spoke about the ideas behind service 
and commitment she simply became 
alive and incredibly. ...committed. 

What is Dean Bennett's future 
image? Where will she be down the 
road? "I see myself as continuing to 
write, where ever I am. Being active 
as in some form a facilitator of 
other's interests. I may see myself as 
spending even more time writing. 
But that is the great unknown, and I 
have no particular need to sort it 
out. No need to push and rush 
anything." - by Tariq Rizk 



Academia 179 



Angela W Chiu 



Kelly Choe 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Ju Me Chon 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Mujde Civan 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Edgar Class 
BA CLEG 

Michael A Clow 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Monique R Coates 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Lauri Cohen 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Laurie Connors 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Julie Conway 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Keri E Cooper 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Donna J Corby 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 




180 The Talon 




Patricia M Corto 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Michael C Cosgrave 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Jennifer A Cousin 
BA ECONOMICS 



Adam C Craig 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Anne F Crook 

BA FRENCH/W EUROPEAN AREA 

STUDIES 

Mae M Crosby 
BA MUSIC 



Mar}' K Crumley 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Michael H Crumley 
BA JUSTICE 

Jeffrey Cugno 

BA LAW AND SOCIETY 



Cynthia A Culloty 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

Heather M Currier 
BA CLEG 

Laura Cutting 
BA LITERATURE 



Academia 181 



Charles J Daly 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Loren D Danzis 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Judith A Daricek 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Paul Darmory 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Deborah S Dashosh 
BA JEWISH STUDIES 

Cari E Deary 
BA JUSTICE 



Michele Debbas 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Lisa C Defelice 
BA ECONOMIC THEORY 

Daisy O Delgado 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Jennifer A Delligatti 
BA JUSTICE 

Nermine R Demopoulos 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Sarah E Deporter 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 




182 The Talon 




Beth A Derketsch 
BA CLEG 

Gina M Derose 

BA COMMUNICATION 

Aissatou C Diallo 
BSBA FINANCE 



Tracey E Diamond 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Charles W Dills 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Michele E Don 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Kerry M Donohue 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Amy Dorcy 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Tanya Drewniak 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Kelly K Druten 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Alexandra J Dunbar Y Fernand 
BA LANGUAGE & AREA STUDIES 

Carolyn Dunn 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Academia 183 



r - " 



Roma Duplak 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Jamillah J Echeverria 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Stephanie A Ecklin 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Scarlett A Ehrhart 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Eric J Elia 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Alona Elkayam 
BA DESIGN 



Steven E Ernest 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Thelia R Esteban 
BA ECONOMICS 

Lalaine F Estella 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Marc H Evans 



Sharon E Ezrin 
BA INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Felicia A Feinberg 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 




184 The Talon 




Michael J Feinson 
BSBA MANAGEMENT 

Glenn Feinstein 
BSBA MARKETING 

Pamela J Fell 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Elisabeth H Felten 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

Jennifer Fennell 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 

Lori N Feuerstein 
BSBA MANAGEMENT 



Bruce D Fiddes 
BA JUSTICE 

Kimberly A Fieschko 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Sylvia Figueroa 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Kenneth A Finneran 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Maria G Fiore 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Joel G Fisher 

BA COMMUNICATION 



Academia 185 



Mark E Fitzhenry 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Michael F Fleming 
BA ECONOMIC THEORY 

Deirdre Flood 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Dorothy E Fowlkes 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 

Julie Ann F raize 
BA DESIGN 

Erin H Frazier 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Jennifer Freeman 
BA PERFORMING ARTS: THEATRE 

Jennifer J Frick 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Davina Friedmann 
BSBA MANAGEMENT 



Lieselotte Frischmann 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Erin M Fuller 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Benjamin T Furmaniak 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 




186 The Talon 




u 



I m proud of 

getting this 

school greater 

dignity within 

the University, 



yy 



School of Communicaton 
Dean Sanford Ungar 



I began my interview with the 
dean of the newly independent 
School of Communication on one 
occasion only to find myself a victim 
of a scheduling backup; I made an 
appointment for the next day. I 
finally sat in the office of Sanford J. 
Ungar and asked him my most 
familiar question: Who is Sanford J. 
Ungar? What's the background? 
Now at this point I usually get much 
along the lines of where a dean was 
born, where a dean went to school, 
etcetera. "I can give you a copy of 
my bio or whatever, but. ..I'm a 
journalist. That's the main thing to 
know about me." 

"I worked on my college news- 
paper and that's really when I think 
I became a journalist. I had a string 
of very interesting and good assign- 
ments overseas before I settled into 
Washington in 1969. I worked for 
UPI in Paris, Newsweek. I worked 
for a chain of South African 
Newspapers... and then I came here 
in 1969 and went to work for the 
Washington Post." Sanford Ungar's 
life in Washington was interrupted 
only by a brief stay in Chicago. 
Here, he edited the Atlantic Monthly 
and Foreign Affairs Journal, he 
directed NPR's All Things Consid- 
ered and then arrived at American 
University in 1986. 

Although his life began modestly 
in a small Pennsylvania town, he 
attended Harvard University and 
obtained his Masters at the London 
School of Economics. 

I asked Dean Ungar how he felt 
about the Centennial Celebration 



American University threw for itself 
this year. "Oh I think it's wonderful 
to celebrate a centennial. I mean this 
is America, we always celebrate 
everything every ten years or five 
years... how can you let a hundred 
year anniversary pass... without 
noting it?" 

Although Dean Ungar was very 
pleased by the Centennial, he felt 
differently about American Univer- 
sity as a whole. I asked him what 
changes he would make if he were 
in charge. "Well, I have a very 
strong view about that. I would 
make it a much more specialized 
university. I think that no university 
should any longer try to be all things 
to all people. I think we're in an era 
of scarcity and specialization, and I 
think this University has to stress its 
strengths and targets of oppotunity. 
It should be much more focused on 
public service, communication, 
international affairs. ..the things that 
people come to Washington for." 

Dean Ungar's strong feeling 
about academia here at AU made 
me wonder why he entered the 
teaching field from his highly suc- 
cessful journalistic career. "I've 
worked in every area of journalism. 
And when this opportunity became 
available to sort of pull all this 
together, I was very excited about it. 
I think that this school is something 
more than just a professional school, 
I think it is more than just a place to 
train students. I think its a center 
where people come and talk about 
some of the bog issues in journalism 

Continued on p. 220 



Academia 187 



Rliayne D Gadson 

BS COMPUTER INFORMATION 

SYSTEMS 

Madelyn L Gadue 
BSBA MARKETING 

Juliana S Gaetano 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Michael Gannon 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Anne R Garr 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Joanna L Garthwaite 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Naomi R Gelfand 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Melissa C Giffing 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Brian R Gilgeous 
BSBA MANAGEMENT 



Joseph F Ginorio 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 

Ronald A Given 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Gordon S Glener 
BA JUSTICE 




188 The Talon 









Craig E Goldberg 

BSBA BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

David S Goldberg 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

VanEssa L Goldschneider 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 



Jill E Golub 

BA ANTHROPOLOGY 

Michelle J Gomez 
BA CLEG 

Warren T Goz 

BA LAW AND SOCIETY 



Sean M Grady 

BA PERFORMING ARTS: THEATRE 

Shawn J Grady 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

James Graham 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Kristin L Gray 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Michelle L Greanias 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Robert C Griffitts 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Academia 189 



Jennifer Grimm 
BSBA MARKETING 

Garrick K Groves 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Danielle Hager 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Charles Hambly III 
BA HISTORY 

Bridgid S Hamidi 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Peter C Hansen 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Heather Harris 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Sharron Harris 
BS CHEMISTRY 

Erika L Hart 
BSBA FINANCE 



Sheryl J Hecht 
BA JUSTICE 

Lily Hekimian 



Tanya Hekimian 
BA INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 




190 The Talon 




Jason A Helgerson 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

John D Hennelly 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Jennifer E Herman 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Maria L Hernandez 

BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Joshua Hill 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Carolyne A Hipolito 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 



Jeffrey A Hirsch 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Peter J Hogarth 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Marcel C Hommel 
BSBA MARKETING 



Deborah Huberman 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Stuart R Huff 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Sarah E Hyatt 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Academia 191 



Beth Imhoff 



Jaime Jimenez Isaza 

BA SPANISH/LATIN AMERICAN 

AREA STUDIES 

Michael Ivancich 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Toby C Jacobsen 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Kadija Jama 
BA SOCIOLOGY 

Leanna L Jancar 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Glenn Jasper 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Ira F Jersey 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Kristen M Johnson 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Christopher Johns 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Lilia M Jones 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Lisa M Jones 
BA COMMUNICATION 





JMkifc 




192 The Talon 




Andrea Jordan 



Tumara R Jordan 
BSBA MARKETING 

Marisa Jubis 
BSBA MANAGEMENT 



David R Kahrmann 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Matthew H Kaiser 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Kavita Kalsy 
BA CLEG 



James L Kaplan 
BA CLEG 

Stacey Kaplan 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 

Beth H Karawan 

BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



Anne Keleher 
BS BIOLOGY 

Barbara Kelly 
BA CLEG 

Jeffrey Kerish 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Academia 193 



Stephanie Op Kiger 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Eumi Kim 

BA FOREIGN LANGUAGE & 

COMMUNICATION MEDIA 

Robert S Klein 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Kristin J Knoettner 
BA JUSTICE 

Anjali D Kochar 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Tsukiyo Kojima 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Christopher L Kokinos 
BA DESIGN 

Jeffrey A Kopman 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 

William A Korp 
BA LITERATURE 



Joel L Kortick 
BA JEWISH STUDIES 

Alison P Kosik 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Sarah Kristensen 
BA LITERATURE 





MJikAi 




194 The Talon 




School of International Service 
Dean Louis Goodman 



u 



Nationwide 

there is a 

discussion that 

says that faculty 

spend too much 

time on 

research, not 
enough time on 
teaching. AU y I 

think, is way 
ahead of other 
places on this. 



» 



This interview was one with a 
special focus for me. I have 
mentioned throughout this 
series that the thrust behind con- 
ducting these interviews was to 
show students a little bit about their 
dean. Well, this was my dean. 

I first met Dean Louis Goodman 
when I first arrived here as some- 
thing other than a visitor. He was 
there to introduce me and a few 
other students to the campus and its 
workings on the first day of a pro- 
gram known then as the Freshman 
International Experience. The pro- 
gram, and Dean Goodman's intro 
was designed to show us a little bit 
more than we had seen on freshman 
day, and to give us a chance to see if 
we liked what we were getting 
ourselves into. 

Louis Goodman hails from 
Danbury, Connecticut. He began his 
lifelong fixation with Latin America 
at Dartmouth College, where he 
found he excelled in Spanish. After 
pursuing a focus combining the 
social science aspect of development 
and urban flight with his Latin 
American concentration, Dean 
Goodman began teaching at Yale. 
He taught classes on international 
business in the third world. He 
worked also at the Woodrow Wilson 
Center in D.C. He came to Ameri- 
can University as a Dean in 1986. 
However, he was a dean and a 
professor. He insists that this dual 
role is very important to him. 

"I work on how institutions that 
operate in the United States have an 
impact on prospects for develop- 



ment in the third world, especially 
Latin America. I still keep up with 
business issues, but I mostly focus 
on the military, the military diplo- 
macy. And like all of the rest of the 
Deans, I came to becoming a dean as 
a result of being involved in higher 
education. To be involved in higher 
education, I started out as a knowl- 
edge-creator, as a researcher.... 
While I've been dean I've continued 
to have a very active research ca- 
reer." 

Dr. Goodman's accent on the 
research and knowledge dissemina- 
tion angle of Deaning impressed me. 
I asked him when he knew he was 
going to be a teacher. 

"For me it didn't happen until 
maybe I was twenty-four, twenty- 
five, as I was finishing my PhD. I 
decided to become a Latin American 
Expert, and I thought that I would 
want to probably work for develop- 
ment agencies. But then, as I be- 
came a researcher in graduate school 
and was good at it, and was good at 
teaching also, I thought that I could 
have the impact on policy also be 
creating new ideas about develop- 
ment. I decided to pursue knowl- 
edge creation. " 

Knowledge creation? 

"For me, for most of the people 
on this faculty, we're in this business 
to create and disseminate knowl- 
edge. That's why research is a 
critical part of what we do here, why 
research and teaching have to go 
hand in hand." 

Dean Goodman seemed to be a 

Continued on p. 220 



Academia 195 



Katrina C Kruhm 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Maria F La Rosa 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Michelle Lamdanski 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 



Kevin A Lane 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Kendra A Langlie 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Larisa Larsen 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 



Cesar C Lastra 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Sabine D Lawler 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Richard J Lawlor 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 



Julia Lazarev 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Annie Leconre 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 

Paul E Lee 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 




196 The Talon 




Dara Lesnik 

BA COMMUNICATION 

Debra F Levin 

BA COMMUNICATION 

Alissa R Levine 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 



Lee E Levy 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Yutong Li 

BA ECONOMICS 

Nancy Licato 

BSBA HUMAN RESOURCE 

MANAGEMENT 



Michael W Light 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Amy L Liner 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Tara Little 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Christopher M Lombardy 
BSBA FINANCE 

Cynthia D Long 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Angela Lovelace 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 



Academia 197 



Bromley Lowe 



Lucy Lucas 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 

Andrea B Ludwig 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Marie M Luna 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

Brent Lunsford 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Meredith Lusthaus 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Jonathan M Lyons 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Wendy N MacHer 
BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Teresa A Mahan 
BA PERFORMING ARTS: THEATRE 



Henrique C Malinverni 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Meta Marinaccio 
BA DESIGN 

Kenneth R Marvin 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 




198 The Talon 




Virginia W Mason 

BSBA BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

INFO SYST 

Ana Maria Matesanz 



Olga Matsoukas 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Kenneth Mayer 

BA GERMAN/W EUROPE AREA 

STUDIES 

Lisa C McGarry 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Susan E McCarthy 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Amy McClain 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Stacie C McCoy 
BS BIOLOGY 

Mary McCullough 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Gregory M McDonald 
BSBA MARKETING 

Colin R McKibbin 
BSBA FINANCE 

Persephone M Meacham 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Academia 199 



I — 



Andrew S Meranus 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 

Chandanie Merhai 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Michael S Meritz 

BSBA REAL ESTATE & URBAN 

DEVELOPMENT 



Erica D Merkow 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Erin Meyer 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Hope B Meyer 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 



Craig M Miller 
BSBA FINANCE 

Dawn M Miller 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Kelly M Miller 
BSBA FINANCE 



Melinda A Millington 

BA SPANISH/LATIN AMERICAN 

AREA STUDIES 

Keith J Mitchell 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

Karl I Moline 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 




AJlifc 



200 The Talon 





\ L i 




Jorge L Morasso 
BA ECONOMICS 

Lee C Morris 
BA LITERATURE 

Peter Movizzo 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Kathleen A Murphy 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Drew M Naukam 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Kimberly P Nelson 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Demetris P Nicolaou 
BSBA FINANCE 

Deborah J Nolind 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Juan J Nolla 
BA CLEG 



Brian T O'Donnell 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Jennifer L O'Neill 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 

Jose A Olavarria 

BA SPANISH/LATIN AMERICAN 

AREA STUDIES 



Academia 201 



Basma M Omair 
BSBA MARKETING 

Kelly D Omeara 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Romelda L Omeir 
BS BIOLOGY 



Nilda G Ortiz 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Dalia Osman 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Jennifer Pacera 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Dinora P Padrino 
BA STUDIO ART 

Lara A Pallen 



Karri L Palmetier 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Michael J Panetta 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Lloyd Parker 

BS COMPUTER INFORMATION 

SYSTEMS 

John R Partise 
BA JUSTICE 




202 The Talon 




« 



We always strive 

to blend what is 

cutting edge in 

political science 

and public 
administration 

with some 
opportunity for 
our students to 

test these 

abstract ideas in 

real-world 

settings. 

» 



School of Public Affairs 
Dean Cornelius Kerwin 



Dean Kerwin was born in 
Waterbury, Ct. When he 
left home, he had planted 
in him a seed of political thought. 
His father was a politically active 
blue-collar man. He ran for state 
senate in 1960, and other than that 
he was very active behind the 
scenes, writing and supporting 
candidates and politicians. Dean 
Kerwin came from Waterbury and 
arrived here. He graduated from 
the American University, class of 
'71. "I grew up in a household that 
was politically active and politically 
aware, and when I decided to 
choose a major in college it was an 
abvious choice for me. I have pur- 
sued it ever since," 

Graduating from American, he 
went to the University of Rhode 
Island for his Master's Degree and 
Johns hopkins University for Doc- 
toral training. "My first job out of 
Hopkins, the first interview I had 
out of Hopkins was back here at AU, 
and I have been on the faculty since 
1975, and I have been Dean since 
1978." 

I mentioned to Dean Kerwin that 
I, too, was interested in education, 
on the college level. He told me the 
way he found out that teaching was 
his calling, and the true vocation 
behind his interest in politics. "I 
was a junior in college here at AU 
and they had experiemented with 
what was at that point a radical 
proposal to allow undergraduates to 
serve as teaching assistants to fac- 
ulty. I was selected to be one of the 
seven teaching assistants who 
would work on the basics of the 



American Politics Course. It was the 
most intimidating experience of my 
life, but it was something that I 
immediately enjoyed and immedi- 
ately knew that teaching was some- 
thing I felt I had not only talent for, 
but somethng that was enormously 
rewarding. I was a junior teaching 
freshmen, and I don't think I've 
been out of the classroom a single 
semester since." 

American University means 
politics to many people, especially 
students in the School of Public 
Affairs. I sensed that Dean Kerwin 
was the man behind the Schools 
hands-on approach to learning 
politics. He was very proud of the 
steps the school had taken to get that 
sort of concept in place here. "We 
always strive to blend what is cut- 
ting edge in political science and 
public administration with some 
opportunity for our students to test 
these abstract ideas in real-world 
settings. The city is the classroom 
for us, and it would be a tragedy not 
to take advantage of that classroom 
to the maximum extent possible. 
Now we do that by bringing city to 
the campus, and by bringing that 
campus to the city." 

How does he feel about the 
competitive angle which seems 
sometimes to pervade schools and 
school choices? Candidates can be 
caught up in names and not neces- 
sarily quality. What does AU's SPA 
have to offer that makes it the choice 
above most? 

"It is important to know where 
your school sits among the other 

Continued on p. 220 



Academia 203 



Rita M Patel 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Paige Patman 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Brian E Paxson 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Elizabeth M Peleckis 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Scott K Persky 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Nicole Petallides 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Jon J Peterson 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Jonathan G Plunkett 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Christine J Pockett 
BA DESIGN 



Joanna L Poole 
BA SOCIOLOGY 

Valerie J Popeck 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Rahil Porjosh 

BSBA HUMAN RESOURCE 

MANAGEMENT 




204 The Talon 




*A+M 




Jennifer A Porter 
BA CLEG 

Cecile A Pratt 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Jaycee A Pribulsky 

BA FOREIGN LANGUAGE & 

COMMUNICATION MEDIA 



Stacey Princi 
BA LITERATURE 

Christopher H Prokop 
BS PHYSICS 

Mark A Pruckner 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Edward Puccerella 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Traci L Putman 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Nicole L Pyles 
BSBA FINANCE 



Holly E Quirk 

BA ANTHROPOLOGY 

Veronica A Radalin 
BA LITERATURE 

Melanie Rappaport 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 



Academia 205 



Daniel P Raskin 
BA CLEG 

Derrick Raymond 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Sheila B Reardon 
BSBA MARKETING 



Julie Read 
BA CLEG 

Matthew B Rees 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 



John J Regan 
BSBA FINANCE 



Elizabeth Reilly 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Lynn A Repasky 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Jessica A Revitch 
BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



Eric S Rich 
BSBA MARKETING 

David M Richardson 
BA CLEG 

Jordan M Richter 
BA INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 







206 The Talon 




Kent B Riffert 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Evan M Rikhye 

BA INTERNATIONAL. STUDIES 

Jossie I Roman 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Lisa R Rosenthal 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Marci A Roth 

BA INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Melissa Sader 
BA CLEG 



Ana M Saldana 
BA ECONOMICS 

Sharifa Salim 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

Brad Samuels 

BA LAW AND SOCIETY 



Carlos Sanchez 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Elizabeth R Sapp 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Jennifer L Savage 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Academia 207 



Stephanie Schechter 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Fern Schrager 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

Allison P Schreiber 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 



Bjorn Schroeder 
BS AUDIO TECHNOLOGY 

Douglas E Schulz 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Stacie A Schumer 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Anastasia K Scurtis 
BA SOCIOLOGY 

Erin C Seiler 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Marcella Serwo 
BSBA MARKETING 



Jennifer L Sessa 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 

Traci B Seversen 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Alpa Sharad 

BSBA BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 




208 The Talon 




Lori L Sherwood 
BA ANTHROPOLOGY 

Corinne A Shevchik 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Jason M Shields 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Tracy L Shimkus 
BA CLEG 

Brigit R Shumate 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Patricia Siahaan 
BSBA FINANCE 



Lillyanne Silbert 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Judith Silver 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 

Theresa D Silver 
BS BIOLOGY 



Jeannine M Sirey 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Linda J Smiroldo 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Faye M Smith 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Academia 209 



Suzanne E Smith 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

James P Snyder 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Monica Sosa 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Patricia L Spayd 
BA DESIGN 

Joel E Sperling 
BA JUSTICE 

Donna A Spicer 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Brian S Spigel 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 

Eve M Stamato 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 

Kathrine L Stapleton 

BA FOREIGN LANGUAGE & 

COMMUNICATION MEDIA 



Shawn D Steffy 
BA CLEG 

Kimberly A Stein 
BA CLEG 

Dana Stiller 
BA COMMUNICATION 




210 The Talon 




u 



When I talk with 
students and alums, 
they tell me that one 
of the secret strengths 
ofAU is the ability to 
interact with people 

who come from 
everywhere. To know 
what it's like to grow 
up in Hungary, or to 
work in Thailand, or 
to run a farm in 
Idaho, or a pilot a 
shrimp boat in Texas 
is an experience that 

I dont think is 
possible elsewhere. 



yy 



Kogod College of Business Administration 

Dean Francis Tuggle 




Dean Tuggle spent his 
childhood bouncing 
around the country as a 
"Navy Brat," and first tasting things 
international during a three-year 
stay in Havana, Cuba, Francis 
Tuggle went to the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, taking a 
triple major. He continued his 
education working under a profes- 
sor who "also dabbled in several 
fields at the same time" at Carnegie 
Technical Institute, now Carnegie 
Mellon University. He pursued 
academic life further at University of 
Kansas after working in the private 
sector and finding he "missed stu- 
dents." With ten years at the Uni- 
versity of Kansas came a realization: 
the Midwest bored him. "The stu- 
dents were incredibly provincial. To 
them, the foreign news was what 
was happening in Dallas, Chicago or 
Denver. New York, San Francisco, 
that was unthinkably far away. 
Athens, Tokyo, those were names of 
another planet. So I left." 

After toying with Administrative 
duties at Rice University in Texas, 
Dean Tuggle came to AU. "I wanted 
Washington because of the interna- 
tional connections." 

Okay, enough with the back- 
ground. I had come here to ask a 
big question. This is that question: 
What is Deaning? 

"I can be flippant and say I go to 
endless meetings, write endless 
memos, and I receive administrivia 
over the transome, but a Dean is 
responsible for overseeing a some- 
what artificial division of intellectual 
labor in the University. The Dean is 



responsible for oversight of the 
curricula, of the faculty that delivers 
the curricula, of the staff that assists 
the faculty in delivering the cur- 
ricula, and all the ensilary that goes 
with it: buildings, supplies, com- 
puter equipment, that the right 
books and journals are in the library, 
that students are recruited, that 
students receive good counsel, that 
students are placed." 

Oh. 

"The Dean doesn't do any of this 
by [himself]. There are committees, 
there are councils...." 

Much better. 

This is the year of American 
University's 100th Anniversary. 
Deans are in a unique position 
which allows them to look on in a 
certain perspective at the progress 
we've made. So how do they feel 
about the Centennial Celebration? 
Have we fulfilled the vision of our 
founder, John Fletcher Hurst? Have 
we become his "beacon on a great 
cliff?" 

"I think to a good degree we are 
realizing that vision. I'm just look- 
ing out my window and I'm watch- 
ing classes change, and I'm seeing 
students from the fifty states andl40 
different countries. When I talk 
with students and alums, they tell 
me that one of the secret strengths of 
AU is the ability to interact with 
people who come from everywhere. 
To know what it's like to grow up in 
Hungary, or to work in Thailand, or 
to run a farm in Idaho, or a pilot a 
shrimp boat in Texas is an experi- 
ence that I don't think is possible 

Continued on p. 221 



Academia 211 



Elizabeth Stoler 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 

Gretchen F Stoloff 
BA INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Karen E Streim 

BSBA HUMAN RESOURCE 

MANAGEMENT 



William B Stroud 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Jennifer Stutz 
BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Kristine Sudano 
BA CLEG 



Juliane L Suk 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Eileen Sullivan 

BA FOREIGN LANGUAGE & 

COMMUNICATION MEDIA 



Francisco J Suro 



Kathryn A Swift 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Taeko Takahashi 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

D Tiffany Tamplin 
BSBA MARKETING 




212 The Talon 




J Martin Tansey 
BA CLEG 

Roman H Tarabzony 



Ted Taya 
BA DESIGN 



Andrew R Taylor 

BA ECONOMIC THEORY 

Anne R Taylor 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Amine Tazi Hemida 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Aimee J Teplinsky 
BA CLEG 

Jonathan C Theodule 
BSBA HUMAN RESOURCE 
MANAGEMENT 

Theron C Thilenius 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Timothy P Titus 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Jeffrey Tockman 
BA LAW AND SOCIETY 

Teresa R Toto 
BSBA ACCOUNTING 



Academia 213 



Eileen D Traeger 
BA PSYCHOLOGY 

Teresa A Travis 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Robert V Treanor 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Dorothy M Troehler 
BA DESIGN 

Kristin A Tucker 
BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Nicole D Turgeon 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Susan L Twain 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Thomas E Twyman 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 

Michelle Vago 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Doanh Q Van 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Amira Van Loan 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Kathleen M Varnum 




214 The Talon 




Ellen Varshavsky 
BSBA MANAGEMENT 

Carlton Vaughn 

BSBA REAL ESTATE & URBAN 

DEVELOPMENT 

Danielle Verderosa 

BA FOREIGN LANGUAGE & 

COMMUNICATION MEDIA 



Paula C Villamizar 

BA SPANISH/LATIN AMERICAN 

AREA STUDIES 

Kyle S Vogel 

BA LAW AND SOCIETY 

Shai Waisman 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Addison N Wallace 



Joellyn A Wallen 
BA HISTORY 

Marcia D Ware 

BA COMMUNICATION 



Rashad Wareh 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Adam S Warshavsky 
BA ECONOMICS 

Stewart C Watkins 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Academia 215 



Joseph L Watson 
BA CLEG 

Charles V Webb 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Ericka L Webb 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Michael Weinberg 

BA FOREIGN LANGUAGE & 

COMMUNICATION MEDIA 

Alexander Wells 



Katharine Wernersbach 
BA FOREIGN LANGUAGE & 



COMMUNICATION MEDIA 

Neil B Weston 
BA LITERATURE 

Tracy L Wetherill 
BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Tanaia White 
BSBA BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 



INFO SYST 

Krista Wiegand 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Opal L Wilkerson 
BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Ian G Williamson 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 




216 The Talon 




Lara M Willis 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Gregory M Winstead 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Carol A Wisniewski 
BGS GENERAL STUDIES 



Jon Wisniewski 
BA PHILOSOPHY 

Caroline Wood 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Sheila M Woodbridge 
BA DESIGN 



Charles E Wright 
BA COMMUNICATION 

Lisa J Wright 

BA COMMUNICATION 

Christopher J Wynne 

BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



Karen E Yates 

BA POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Kayoko Yokoyama 

BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Yasutaka Yoneda 



Academia 217 



Edmond Young 
BA ECONOMICS 

Julia A Zajkowski 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

John G Zapp 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Darrian C Zaslowe 
BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Matthew N Ziegler 
BSBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Randi M Ziman 
BSBA MARKETING 



Patrick A Zinna 



William S Zinsmeister 
BA INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Robin Zisson 
BA COMMUNICATION 



Johanna Zucaro 





i ^NL ^^" ah L 






SENIOR DATA WAS COLLECTED FROM THE 
UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR'S COMPUTER. SPECIAL 
THANKS TO MARY NELSON FOR HER CONTINUED 
SUPPORT THROUGHOUT THE YEARS. 

THE TALON CLAIMS NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR 
DEGREES THAT ARE MISSING OR NAMES THAT ARE 
MISSPELLED. EVERY ATTEMPT WAS MADE TO 
INSURE ACCURATE INFORMATION. THE DEGREES 
LISTED ARE THOSE ON RECORD AT THE UNIVERSITY 
REGISTRARS OFFICE. 



218 The Talon 




« 

AU is a 

nationally 

reknowned 

university with 

an 

international, 

global reach, 

utilizing the 

resources of 

Washington 

D.C. And that 

covers a lot of 

ground for me. 



» 



Division of Student Life 
Vice Provost Maurice J. Oconnell 



One of the people who is 
most responsible for the 
daily life of American 
University students is Maurice J. 
O'Connell. Maury O'Connell's 
official title is Vice Provost for Stu- 
dent Life. This title, which is decep- 
tive, is a catch-all for the job of 
maintaining the quality of student 
life, residential welfare, the univer- 
sity as a whole. 

I spoke to Maury on the eve of 
the University's Gala Centennial 
celebration and Homecoming fes- 
tivities. Obviously excitement was 
high as the President of the United 
States, Bill Clinton, agreed to speak 
at the convocation. 

However, I first wanted to get a 
grasp of what Maury O'Connell 
was. I mean, the title, as I've men- 
tioned, is somewhat deceptive. 

"I guess I almost think of myself 
as an educational broker, trying to 
broker educational academic pro- 
grams, trying to broker educational 
services with the people according 
to their own objectives and needs." 

What is it that lead Maurice J. 
O'Connell to American to become 
an Educational Broker? O'Connell 
started out at a community college, 
then moved on to a state-related 
school, Temple University of 
Philidelphia. "It was really at 
Temple that I got into the traditional 
undergraduate recruitment scheme. 
I came to AU in '83 as Director of 
Admissions. So I've worked at an 
open-admissions institution, I've 
worked at a very large, urban, state- 
related institution and ultimately at 



AU in a private, selective University 
in terms of the undergraduate pro- 
gram. But that's what I enjoy the 
most, getting students together with 
the educational programs according 
to what their interests are and their 
educational goals are." 

"Most people in this line of work 
talk about themselves as educators 
and they're looking for educational 
moments. I don't. I see myself in 
this broker role. When you look 
across the Division [of Student Life] 
we have psychologists, doctors, 
lawyers, ministers, specialists in 
areas such as multicultural affairs 
and international student services, 
and I don't consider myself an 
expert in any one of those. But what 
I do conceive to have a facility for is 
putting those kinds of people to- 
gether in ways that meet the needs 
of students. I call that educational 
brokering. I don't see it as an educa- 
tor, per se. But I take teachers and 
students and try to get them to- 
gether. " 

I asked him if the business of 
educational brokering was what was 
going on in the sea of paperwork on 
his desk. 

He explained his job even fur- 
ther, and I realized the true meaning 
of "catch-all position." 

"I am the University's chief 
student affairs officer. So my chief 
job, my main responsibility is that 
when students are not engaged in 
classes, that they are still engaged in 
meaningful ways with the educa- 
tional community. That takes a lot 

Continued on p. 221 



Academia 219 



ean Unger (Continued from p. 187) 
and communication. [The American 
Forum programs were created] so 
that we could raise the profile of the 
school and make it a place where 
people expect some of these issues 
to be talked about. That's been one 
of the things I've enjoyed the most 
about it... we do four or five times a 
semester the types of programs most 
school are happy to have once a 
year." 

Well, how about a legacy for 
Dean /journalist Sanford Ungar. For 
what would he like to be remem- 
bered? "I sometimes say it's getting 
the ladies room put in the third floor 
of Mary Graydon Center. Actualy, I 
think what I'd like to be remem- 
bered for is. ..the period of substan- 
tial growth in the faculty, student 
body, graduate programs. We've 
reconfigured the ways you can 
study communication. I'm proud of 
getting this school greater dignity 
within the University. We are tak- 
ing our place as a new significant 
part of the University." The School 
of Communication was liberated 
from the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences on May 1, 1993. 
Dean Goodman 
(Continued from p. 195) 
great proponent of research. Did he 
feel as if the research end of knowl- 
edge creation was being under- 
played? 

"Nationwide there is a discus- 
sion that says that faculty spend too 
much time on research, not enough 
time on teaching. AU, I think, is 
way ahead of other places on this. 
We've had a primary focus on 
teaching throughout the modern 
history of this University. The 
challenge for AU is to get our re- 
search up to national levels. I think 
that all of the parts of this University 
would like to see themselves more 
highly rated in terms of research and 
for the research productivity and 



quality that its faculty does. We've 
made great improvements, but we'd 
all like to do better." 

For what would he like to be 
remembered for in his role as Dean? 

"I would like to see the School of 
International Service be very strong 
and very proud of itself, standing 
for excellence at all three levels of 
education: undergraduate, graduate 
and doctorate, with a very clear 
sense of itself and very clear links to 
the University that are dynamic and 
going in both directions. I think 
we've made tremendous progress 
on that in the past seven years. And 
I think that reinforcing the quality 
and strengthening those links are 
the next steps in the process." 
Dean Kerwin 
(Continued from p. 203) 
schools around the country, but in 
many ways this is a unique institu- 
tion. American University is a place 
that survives and thrives on the 
strenth of the student body and its 
faculty. Those are the the two key 
elements that keep us going as an 
institution." 

In addition to Deaning, Kerwin is 
involved in many external academic 
projects. He maintains that his first 
profession was teaching and that is 
something he never leaves behind. 
He has tought everything from 
undergraduate courses to PhD 
seminars. He is in the final stages of 
a book on government rulemaking. 
He is invoved in a number of profes- 
sional association and activities 
which deal with public affairs. He 
heads a commission which accredits 
other schools of public affairs, he 
chairs the section on public law and 
administration in the American 
Society for Public Administration. 
"I try to the maximum extent pos- 
sible to remain intellectually en- 
gaged with several associations so 
that I can effectively represent the 
interests of the school to the larger 



national community." 

At one point, I asked him what 
the best part of being a Dean was. 
He evaded at first, and I returned to 
it and he finally confronted it. 
"That's a very tough question. The 
best single thing I do, I think, the 
one I get the biggest kick out of, is 
presiding over graduation ceremo- 
nies, because then the results of 
what we've done here for four 
years. ..walk across the stage and 
leave us, and that's a very special 
feeling." 

Dean Kerwin is the only subject 
of any of my interviews who has 
been intimately involved with 
American University since his aca- 
demic life began. I wondered how 
our attitude and student body had 
changed over twenty-five years he 
had known us. 

"Students in 1993 would not 
recognize the campus that I left in 
1971. This was a hotbed of political 
activity. Demonstrations out here 
on Ward Circle, confrontations 
between D.C. police and AU student 
body, right outside this window. 
And I was in the middle of it as a 
kid myself, and it's kind of a re- 
markable transition, from that side 
of Ward Circle to this one. AU has 
always had a quality of bringing 
diverse, curious people to campus. 
How has it changed? I sense a much 
more uniform seriousness of pur- 
pose about academics among stu- 
dents. The student body that I was 
part of was often distracted by a 
tremendous amount of political 
activity. It was the height of the 
Vietnam War. At that point politics 
competed with academics. I think 
now in this era politics and academ- 
ics are more complementary. We 
use politics to learn, to supplement 
the academic enterprise better than 
we did back then." 



220 The Talon 



Dean Tuggle 
(Continued from p. 211) 

elsewhere. And I think it is a good 
realization of what he had in mind a 
hundred years ago. We're a micro- 
cosm of this country; we're a melt- 
ing pot of the intellectual elite." 

One of this University's biggest 
selling point is this location. Wash- 
ington, D.C., as Dean Tuggle sees it, 
is a city in transition. "I believe it 
will increasingly become a business 
center, as well as a political center 
and an international center, and that 
is part of the reason I'm here, I'm 
betting on the long term that the 30 
year old characterization of New 
York as the financial center and 
Boston as the cultural center and 
D.C. as the political center is shifting 
and my guess is that D.C will be- 
come the center of all three, in time." 

Dean Tuggle was a man who 
chose each word carefully, lovingly 
speaking each gently. He is the 
father of two children, one a sopho- 
more at Carnegie Mellon University, 
another is a senior in high school. 
He paints, draws, writes poetry and 
exercises. His biggest regret is not 
getting enough time with students. 

And so I asked him what experi- 
ence sums up American University, 
for him. What makes AU for Dean 
Tuggle? 

"I spend a fair amount of time 
out of the office, partly for recruiting 
students, partly for alumni contact, 
partly for fundraising. I do find 
myself surprised when I am out of 
the office running into highly-placed 
people literally around the world 
who have an AU link, who feel so 
good about the place, and they keep 
cropping up in unexpected places. I 
found them in Brussels, Milan, Los 
Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Houston, 
New York, and that's a real plea- 
sure, and that's one reason I enjoy 
doing it. 



Maurice O'Connell 
(Continued from p. 219) 
of different things. It takes an ability 
to facilitate faculty/student, teach- 
ing/learning exchange outside the 
classroom. It takes students and 
tries to give them a role in the 
decisionmaking of their community. 
It tries to encourage dialogue be- 
tween the different constituencies of 
our community. That's faculty, 
staff, students, administrators, 
alumni. But even within each of 
those, the subcultures are just nu- 
merous. Not all students are alike. 
Plus half this institution is graduate, 
or part-time. This job, this desk is 
trained to meet the needs of all those 
different groups, and to give them a 
piece of the action, to give them a 
piece of the community. They have 
as much say in the direction this 
University is going and as much of 
the values of this community at 
stake as any group. That takes a lot 
of work." 

While waiting for Maury 
O'Connell, I asked out of curiousity 
what the Staff Assistant and the 
Intern though went on in the office. 
The answer gave me insight into yet 
another dimension of the catch-all 
position, Vice Provost for Student 
Life. They told me that they saw the 
office often acting as a liason be- 
tween students and administration. 
Whether it comes through channels, 
via RA's, RD's or directly to Maury's 
desk, this is a common occurrence. I 
wondered how O'Connell filled this 
role. 

"One of the things that we seek is 
fairness, we seek justice, we seek to 
do the right thing. Sounds easy, but 
people's perception of what's fair 
and what's just and what's the right 
thing is very situational. And what 
we try to do is in objective ways, 
sort through what is best for every- 
one. Sometimes it's unpopular, but 
still this community holds certain 
values and sometimes you have to 
say no, even though it's unpopular." 



Maury O'Connell struck me as a 
person who definitely knew and 
enjoyed his job. His insights, and 
his contacts with the student body 
impressed me even before I met 
him. Of the administration as a 
whole, he was one who I had spoken 
to as a representative of my resi- 
dence hall, and as a student. He is 
there for the students for all of his 
job. 

He told me that he sees on the 
forefront, as an aspect of his job, and 
as an aspect of the direction the 
University is moving as a whole, a 
new statement of mission for Ameri- 
can University. 

"I think Provost Greenberg said 
it most succinctly when he said 'a 
good mission statement is a short 
mission statement.' All you have to 
do is think a moment about what we 
say about AU. AU is a nationally 
reknowned university with an 
international, global reach, utilizing 
the resources of Washington D.C. 
And that covers a lot of ground for 
me." 

TARIQ RIZK is a free lance 
writer for The Talon as well as a 
Co-Editor on the Campus team. 
His efforts have helped to make 
this book possible. 

All academic interviews were 
conducted and written by him. 

Lauding from Pennsylvania. 
Tariq came to American in the 
Fall of 1991 where he began 
working with The Talon. His 
unique writing skills, unending 
dedication and peculiar sense 
of humor have helped to make 
this book a pleasure to pro- 
duce. 

All academic photographs 
were taken by Matthew 
Lovering, Talon Photo Editor. 



Academia 221 



f *%■ 








PL- 


mm a m m i 


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9 



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When I think of the passage of time it never ceases to amaze me 
how fast it moves. Of course when you think of it minute by minute 
it seems like eternity but in retrospect it seems the opposite. I don't 
think that there is anyone out there who doesn't think, at one time or 
another, how "time flies." 

I have had the unique experience to examine each year periodically 
through this book. At times it was an arduous task, at others a 
pleasant one. Yet still I was able to record the information as it 
happened for others to look back on five, ten, even twenty years 
later. 

As this book finally goes to press the summer will end. Commence- 
ment has commenced and concluded and many of us are moving 
on, leaving American behind. We have been through an experi- 
ence of awareness, of enlightenment. We have all changed since 
we first came to American, either internally, externally or both. Our 
lives have been effected by those around us: professors, counselors, 
friends and even enemies. We have (hopefully) learned from our 
mistakes as well as our successes. 

My experience at The American University has come to a close. This 
chapter in my life has ended and I have moved on to a new one. 
However, I don't feel that it is over. 

As our commencement ceremony began I felt this overwhelming 
sense of accomplishment. However, deep down inside I also felt 
thankful. Thankful toward those who have made an impact on my 
life. Those with whom I learned and those who taught me as well. 
My life has been changed in infinite ways. American helped me 
find direction when I needed it. I, like many students, came to A.U. 
with intentions of pursuing one career and instead fell in love with a 
completely different one. 

Every one of us has had the opportunity to grow and learn from 
others. We have experienced "higher education," a goal that to 
some may seem impossible for one reason or another. Some of us 
came to A.U. without worrying about financial means and some of 
us fought to stay here with the hopes of continuing what we started. 
Either way, we have experienced an opportunity that has allowed us 
to change ourselves and hopefully to change the world, no matter 
how small or large. 

-ft:* t 

It is quite possible that one of our classmates could some day be- 
come President, or Ambassador, doctor or lawyer, editor or journal- 
ist. Some of us may become teacher or social worker, professor or 
parent. Regardless of position or title, each of us will draw upon our 
experience gained at The American University. 







Aside from the promotion of ourselves up the economical food chair] 
of life, hopefully we will have the opportunity to give back. Giving 
back could be as little donating to a scholarship fund or as great as 
teaching someone something, anything that will help them improve 
themselves. We have been given a gift, the gift of knowledge. 
Many think that it is not a gift because it was paid for. This is an ; 
illusion. We have, in my opinion, experienced a perpetuating cycld 
of knowledge. Our years here have taught us not only facts and 
figures but also how to continue to think and learn in new ways. 
This education will not only be with us for our entire lives, it will 
allow us to look at things differently, to examine them and draw 
upon what we have learned to understand what we do not. It is a 
never ending cycle. 

This goal we have attained is useless if we keep it to ourselves. In j 
order to preserve this perpetuating cycle we must, in turn, convey 
what we have learned. It is like contributing to a large wealth of 
knowledge that each member only fortifies it and allows it to grow. 
What does all of this mean? It means that the gift of knowledge is 
just that, a gift. One that is to be given away as easily as it was 
acquired. This can be interpreted many ways. It could mean that 
some of us will become professors ourselves while others will teach j 
their own children, and still others will knowingly or not, help to 
change lives. 

I 
American University, to me, was more than a four year experience,^ 
rather it was an experience that will last a lifetime. 

-Christopher L Kokinos, Editor-inChic 



1 1 1 ii 



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AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 



1893 - 1993 






^r 



For over 65 years, Talon has be'ei 
' within The American University. It has become the most 
trusted tour book for decades. Each year Talon brings you 
the best of the best of goings-on and you can count on up to 
the minute information and facts. 

' Talon will take you on a tour of the campus as well as of the 
nation and the world. We will also show you what is going 
on the stage as well as on the field or on the court. 

When you plan your next vacation, remember to buy the 
book by the people with the first nam 
guidebooks. ...Talon. 



'"•■••I 

nr 1 



.A A 



Featured in this guide 



A review of campus life 
What to see on and off campus 
All the action of American sports 
Arts and entertainment around town 
Sight-seeing and seasonal events 
Spectacular study spots 
Highlights of academic life 



.39 
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